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Archive for the ‘Fisherton Sarum’ Category

This months picture…

Gresley A4 class 60033 ‘Seagull’ heads to London on a locomotive exchanges route familiarisation working in May 1948. The Home signal that controls entry to Platform 1 or 3 at Salisbury Station is made from model Signal Engineering components.

Gresley A4 class 60033 ‘Seagull’ heads to London on a locomotive exchanges route familiarisation working in May 1948. The Home signal that controls entry to Platform 1 or 3 at Salisbury Station is made from model Signal Engineering components.

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This coming weekend, 22nd & 23rd April,  sees the annual Epsom and Ewell MRC exhibition and one of only a couple appearances of Fisherton Sarum this year.  The Epsom and Ewell Model Railway Club is I think one oldest model railway clubs around having been established in 1952. The exhibition is being held at their usual venue of the North East Surrey College of Technology (NESCOT), Reigate Road, Ewell, Surrey KT17 3DS . It is always good to be exhibiting in the heart of the Southern Railway’s territory.

I have taken some time out from building my latest little train set Canute Road Quay (which itself is making its first ‘public’ debut the following weekend, more of which in a future post next week) to set Fisherton Sarum up at the clubrooms of the High Wycombe and District MRS, for which I am most grateful to repair a couple of things such as the turntable and ensure that everything else is working OK.

Although missing the show my Dad will be attending in spirit and in model form as he and fellow school mates are captured trying to bunk the shed as he did in his school short wearing days

I will be ably assisted during the weekend by some regular operators and friends, although unfortunately my father will miss the show as he is recovering from recent emergency heart surgery (for which offer my sincere thanks to all the amazing staff involved within the NHS). I am pleased that he is well on the mend but rightly still convalescing, so get well soon Dad!

All boxed up and ready for loading. The green boxes resting on the top of the layout are the two lighting rig boxes. The control is nestled between the ‘L’Girders of the baseframe under the layout’s ‘Target’ style nameboard.

As with most layouts being exhibited some method of protection for transportation  is required and this is not normally seen by the general public at shows. Although when set up the Fisherton Sarum is 20 foot  long it was designed from the outset in such away that  everything included the stock boxes  (converted stout DJ cases designed for carrying up to 120 CDs) containing over 80 locomotives and some 20 coaches along with numerous wagons, will all fit in a Mondeo estate car!

An overview of the scenic section of Fisherton Sarum

My two scenic boards, each 4′ x 3′ are bolted together by wooden end frames to form a box just small enough to fit through though the tailgate of the car.  The layouts legs are bolted to the inside of baseboards  ‘L’ girders and therefore fold up inside the baseboards out of the way.  The whole box arrangement sits on a set of wheels for easy transportation from the car into and around the exhibition venue. As I use cassettes in the fiddle yards these boards are flat topped ‘paste table’ style  and the legs fold up held in place by clips and then these slide alongside the scenic board ‘box’ in the rear of the car.  Other items such as the end backscene pieces, lighting rig support struts and the control panel (whose width was designed specifically to do so) tuck between the ‘L’ girders of the upturned scenic board.

I hope this little insight into the behind the scenes aspect of exhibiting a layout has been of interest, if you are dropping by the exhibition next weekend, please make sure you say hello!  Fisherton Sarum is stand 25 at the show.

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Just like a good backscene; see my A view from the line post regarding Fisherton Sarum’s backscene here, or my Canute Road Quay backscene post here; another area that I think is vital for any model railway layout, especially if being exhibited, is good lighting. There are a number of reasons for this: firstly and the main reason, is of course to show of your modelling efforts and skills in the best light (pun intended) possible, and secondly due to the fact the ambient lighting at exhibition venues can be variable at best. One key area to bear in mind is the colour / warmth of the lighting that you provide, more of which below…

Over the years a number of methods have been used with mixed results, such as using a number of spot lamps, fluorescent tubes, a mixture of the two and more recently LED strips. I am generally not a fan of multiple spot lamps especially facing in different directions as they can give unrealistic multiple shadows. Note also that technically you plant bulbs but use lamps as a light source in a luminaire…

colour-temperatureThe colour of white, might sound odd but in fact it’s actually a thing, or rather the colour temperature is. This colour temperature is measured in Kelvin (K). The slightly unnatural yellowy orange tint of a classic tungsten lamp would be in the 2700K (warm white) range, with the light becoming colder and whiter and slightly more natural, up to around 6500K for a cold blue light and even more blue up to 10,000K.
Many of us find doing actual modelling or craft work under a daylight cool blue white lamp (the daylight lamp I use is around the 4000K mark) easier on the eye and also better for rendition of other colours under this artificial light, this especially useful when painting.
Therefore the lighting that we use on our layouts will also benefit from being at the more daylight blue and more natural end of the white temperature spectrum.

A split image showing lighting on Fisherton Sarum from the public’s view (top) and operator’s view (bottom)

A split image showing lighting on Fisherton Sarum from the public’s view (top) and operator’s view (bottom)

On Fisherton Sarum I use, mounted inside the overhead pelmet (painted white inside), two daylight / cool white range (6500K)  florescent tubes to give the overall and even illumination, with two additional spot daylight rated (approx 6000K) spot lamps to give additional illumination to the front corners of the layout specifically around the shed and houses areas (these are far enough apart and carefully angled to prevent any unwanted / unrealistic odd shadows).

Many modellers are now using LED lighting for layout lighting and usually via the increasingly widely available strips of surface mounted LEDs that you simply cut to length. They either come with a transformer and or a controller of some description. This is what I have chosen to use on Canute Road Quay. Just like lamps and fluorescent tubes these LED strips can be obtained in a variety of  white colour ranges usually: warm (between 2700-3200K), daylight (4000-4500K) and cool (5000-6200K).

A view from the inside of Canute Road Quay with the LED strip installed in the underside of the pelmet

A view from the inside of Canute Road Quay with the LED strip installed in the underside of the pelmet

I obtained a metre long, cool white, self adhesive LED strip, plug and play kit complete with plug mounted mains transformer from LED Hut this was inexpensive, already the correct length and very easy to fit. The kit came with a simple plug and socket connection to the lead from the transformer, which I have extended to enable me to mount the socket under the baseboard.
With the overcast greyish sky backscene and drab industrial colours I am using on Canute Road Quay I opted for cool white as the more yellowish warm white would conflict with the overall layout colouration and appear to be less natural.

The even lighting of the LED strip can be seen in this picture of Canute road Quay as it currently stands

This strip has given a very even natural looking light, that alone slightly too bright for what I will want if and when I exhibit Canute Road Quay, I have therefore now added added an opaque strip of plastic in front of the LEDs to reduce the brightness slightly.
Some of the more expensive LED strips on the market allow you to control both the brightness and colour range, which would also give rise to changing the lighting to represents different times of the day etc.  and I can see such effects being utilised more and more in the hobby.

 

 

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This months picture…

A Maunsell N1 class, a modified Bachmann model hauls ballast train past the shed. The SR Diagram 1774 40T hoppers are modified LIMA wagons on new bogies and other details. Salisbury Cathedral can be seen in the background.

A Maunsell N1 class, a modified Bachmann model, hauls ballast train past the sheds coal stage. The SR Diagram 1774 40T hoppers are modified LIMA wagons on new bogies and other details. Salisbury Cathedral can be seen in the background.

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This months picture…

A couple of school children watch waiting to see how the postman  deals with the pending conflict with the householders dog!

A couple of school children watch waiting to see how the postman deals with the pending conflict with the householders dog!

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This months picture…

The powerful Urie 4-8-0T G16 class No 494 is captured on the coal stage ramp. She is a Golden Arrow resin body on a modified Hornby Chassis.

The powerful Urie 4-8-0T G16 class No 494 is captured on the coal stage ramp. She is a Golden Arrow resin body on a modified Hornby Chassis.

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Some of the more eagle eyed readers of this little corner of the blogosphere will have no doubt noticed that the over the last couple of weeks the number of booked appearances of Fisherton Sarum at exhibitions has increased with a couple added to the diary for this year and also for 2018 too.  As I only purposely exhibit at between one or three shows a year on average it is always good to see and talk to readers of this blog at such shows and chat about all things Southern Railway whilst playing trains.

nevard_081024_fisherton_DSC_2673_webSo just a heads up that the current list of booked shows are as follows;  if you are in the area and able to come along please say hello:

Also by way of even more advanced notice the following appearances are booked for 2018.

Any other appearances of either Fisherton Sarum or even perhaps Canute Road Quay will also appear on my Exhibition Diary page here so check back from time to time for more information.

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