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Archive for the ‘Fisherton Sarum’ Category

This months picture…

Maunsell 2-6-0 N1 class 1822 heads west on a freight service. 1822 has been converted from a Bachmann N Class with modified front end and valve gear. The first four wagons are banana vans piped with steam heating to help ripen the fruit.

Maunsell 2-6-0 N1 class 1822 heads west on a freight service. 1822 has been converted from a Bachmann N Class with modified front end and valve gear. The first four wagons are banana vans piped with steam heating to help ripen the fruit.

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This months picture…

Bulleid Light Pacific, Battle of Britain 21C151 'Winston Churchill' is turned at Fisherton Sarum.

Bulleid Light Pacific, Battle of Britain 21C151 ‘Winston Churchill’ is turned at Fisherton Sarum.

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Wear and tear occurs on anything mechanical over time and model railways are no exception, especially when subjected to the rigors (and occasionally operator error) of exhibiting for hours on end at shows. One of the focal points on Fisherton Sarum is of course the turntable which during an exhibition seems to be pretty much constantly on the go especially when younger viewing eyes are present.

My T14 is turned on the turntable at Fisherton Sarum

I have posted before about the turntable on Fisherton Sarum in my Controlling Interests #2 post here., but as a quick recap the turntable comprises of a Peco LK-55 kit where I have utilised the well and deck, whilst adding scratch built sides to represent the turntable installed at Salisbury; and it is controlled by  MERG turntable control kit which drives via a stepper motor and gearbox.
During the last couple of shows I attended with Fisherton Sarum I noticed that the operation of the turntable was getting less and less reliable mainly due to issues of the plastic drive shaft mounting hub on the underside of the table deck starting to disintegrate and wear to the  track power feed split contact ring.  I therefore decided to hopefully remedy the issues by removing the deck and trying to replace the drive shaft mount and also effect a repair on the power feed ring. However having examined the removed turntable and due to the lack of the original plastic now remaining at the mounting point it proved difficult to align my replacement metal bush accurately, both vertically and centrally, to give reliable running.

The original scratch built side sides have been grafted onto the new deck

I have now therefore obtained a replacement turntable kit and built a brand new replacement deck (if anyone wants the kits well components that I now have surplus to requirements let me know, free to a good home…) and carefully added the scratch built sides from the original deck to the new one.

The replacement split ring pick up bush in the middle of the well

I have also replaced the now worn power feed split ring in the turntable well as the plungers on the underside of the deck over time had worn a groove and then starting to catch on the edge of the copper split rings.
In order to make future maintenance easier and allowing easy removal of the deck, if required, I have also now incorporated new direct coupling with grub screws. I carefully drilled on a pillar drill to ensure vertical alignment, the bush in the underside of the deck to suit a 4mm OD silver steel rod to match the output shaft of the gearbox and the coupling,  as the Peco LK-55  kit is designed to be interference fit  for a standard Meccano imperial Standard Wire gauge 8 shaft.
I had tried as an experiment a  Ruland Aluminium Flexible Beam Coupling, from RS Components to link the drive shafts of the deck and gearbox, but although these are designed specifically for use with stepper motor drive systems where no back lash is a requirement a certain amount of juddering occurred as they flexed, so I have gone back to a fixed brass coupling but one with two opposing grub screws at each end to ensure a good grip on the shafts (which as per good practice have a slight flat filed on them to ensure the grub screw can grip properly.

The replacement turntable has been fitted and tested on Fisherton Sarum and means that the layout is all ready for its next outing at the Hampton Court MRS, Tolworth Showtrain, on 11th / 12th November at the Tolworth Recreation Centre, Fullers Way North, Tolworth, Surrey, KT6 7LQ

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This months picture…

Douchess class No. 46236 'City of Bradford' is turned at Fisherson Sarum during trial runs for the 1948 Locomotive Exchange trials, she is coupled to a WD tender due to the SR not having any water troughs.

Stanier Duchess class No. 46236 ‘City of Bradford’ is turned at Fisherson Sarum during trial runs for the 1948 Locomotive Exchange trials, she is coupled to a WD type tender for the trials due to the SR not having any water troughs.

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Today is the funeral, of London South Western Railway historian and modelling stalwart, octogenarian Henry Bousher who sadly passed away on 8th July after a battle with ill health.  This post is by way of a mark of respect to Henry, my condolences to his family and fellow friends and by a small way a celebration of his many full years of life.

Henry was a member of the Epsom and Ewell Model Railway Club in excess of 50 years, an active and long term member of the South Western Circle and and also The Model Railway Club. His knowledge of and enthusiasm for the London and Southern Western Railway (LSWR) was extensive and infectious, along with a great humour coupled to his joy at seeing pictures of or an accurately modelled rake of Salmon and Chocolate LSWR coaching stock (especially with the coach roofs being white).  He will be sorely missed as will be his willingness to assist, teach and impart his knowledge to others.

A view of the representation of Waterloo station on the Southwalk Bridge layout

He was actively involved, even when his health was not so great, in the wonderful LSWR 4mm scale P4 gauge layout Southwalk Bridge, having been instrumental in its conception, research, construction and operation. His legacy of his involvement will happily continue for many years to come.

An M7 brings empty stock into the station under the impressive signal cabin and gantry

Southwalk Bridge, being built by the Southampton Area group of the Scalefour Socity under the helm of Micheal Day, is a piece of LSWR splendour depicting the approaches to a seven platform representation of the LSWR terminus at Waterloo, set in 1912.  It runs to a sequence depicting a typical range of trains and movements of the time,  via a fully interlocked signalling system and a number of controlling driving positions over its 45 foot length.

An O2 arrives, the signalling levers for the interlocked operation can be seen in the background

I have had the pleasure of visiting and operating the layout on a couple of occasions now, and the layout will no doubt form the basis of more detailed future post. I will never forget my last visit, earlier this year, where I was chaperoned / guided / instructed at one of the controller locations, the Up Main, by Henry for the day. I was able to listen to, learn from and enjoy his humour and knowledge for a prolonged period, it was truly a fabulous day and felt very much an honour and fun to be in his company.

Rest In Peace Henry!

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Today the 9th July 2017 marks 50 years since the end of steam on the Southern Region. During the final weeks in July 1967 there were officially 72 steam engines left in service that obviously included a small number of Bulleid Merchant Navy’s (6) and West County Class locomotives (18 including two in original form) but also a number of British Railways standard classes such as BR Standard 5MT and 4MT 4-6-0s, 4MT 2-6-0s, 4MT 2-6-4Ts, 3MT 2-6-2Ts and Ivatt 2-6-2Ts. The other loco class active until the end was the USA 0-6-0T at Guildford, Southampton and Eastleigh. These final steam allocated duties up to the final day final day  included boat trains to Weymouth or Southampton Docks, some standard service trains to Weymouth and also a few freight and departmental turns. The old West of England line west of Salisbury had already been taken over by the Western Region and steam was effectively eliminated on the line from late 1964.

35028 awaits the off from platform 19 of Waterloo on today’s Waterloo Sunset tour to Yeovil and return.

Merchant Navy Class Bulleid Pacific 35028 was one of those locomotives in service until nearly the end. She is now happily preserved and extremely well maintained by the Merchant Navy Locomotive Preservation Society.  She has just returned to regular main line service following an extensive overhaul,carried out by LNWR Heritage at Crewe, to gain a new ten year boiler certificate.

36028 just before today’s departure. Picture copyright and courtesy D Puddicombe

She has now returned to her home base at Stewarts Lane and has already this  week on the main line including a tour  to commemorate the last Bournemouth Belle on the 5th July (which was also Clan Line’s last actual day in BR service).

I am honoured to travelling behind her today on the UK Railtours Waterloo Sunset railtour today to Yeovil Junction and back to mark the 50th anniversary.

My model of Bulleid West Country 34013 Okehampton

One of the Bulleid West Country Class locomotives that also survived to the end of steam on the Southern was 34013 ‘Okehampton’ which unfortunately did not get preserved but she appears left in model form, although possibly slightly cleaner than she actually ended in service.

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This months picture…

Bulleid Merchant Navy class 21C14 'Nederland Line' built from a Millholme kit, heads to London with the up Devon Belle having taken over the train at Wilton. Adams O2 built from a Wills kit, shunts the ash wagon on shed. My Grandfather, a Ganger,  can be seen taking a break leaning on his ballast fork near the platelayers hut.

Bulleid Merchant Navy class 21C14 ‘Nederland Line’ built from a Millholme kit, heads to London with the up Devon Belle having taken over the train at Wilton. Adams O2 built from a Wills kit, shunts the ash wagon on shed. My Grandfather, a Ganger, can be seen taking a break leaning on his ballast fork near the platelayers hut.

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