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This weekend, 14th and 15th September sees the annual Faversham Model Railway Club exhibition being held at the The Abbey School, London Road, Faversham. ME13 8RZ.  I am looking forward to exhibiting Fisherton Sarum at this show as I havent exhibited this layout in a whilele at this show, the first of its two appearances on the road this autumn (the other being  Beckenham and West Wickham MRC on the 19th October.)

ex LSWR Adams 0395 class 0-6-0 No 3441 awaits here next pilot tern on Fisherton Sarum.

There will be 18 working layouts across a variety of scales, gauges and prototypes. And a selection of traders.
The show is open on Saturday between 10am to 4.30pm and on Sunday between 10am and 4.00pm.

A quiet period on shed with Bulleid pacific 21C102 “Salisbury” being cleaned, A Drummond 4-4-0 L11 “Large Hopper” No 405 is being coaled. An Adams 0-4-4T O2 No 213 also simmers on shed.

It is also good to be exhibiting Fisherton Sarum again within Southern Railway territory even if the Eastern section in Kent rather than the South Western section.

The venue is just off the A2 London Road and if coming via train it is only approximately an 8 minute walk from Faversham station (up side exit)

If you are planning on coming along,  Fisherton Sarum is stand number 7 located in the hall one, please drop by and say hello, it is always a pleasure to meet and chat with readers of this blog.

Following many years of lobbying to bring about official recognition of the sacrifices made by merchant seafarers in the two world wars.
The slogan is ‘ Fly the Red Ensign for Merchant Navy Day – 3rd September’
Since 2000, Merchant Navy Day on 3rd September has honoured the brave men and women who kept our ‘island nation’ afloat during both World Wars, and celebrated our dependence on modern day merchant seafarers who are responsible for 95% of the UK’s imports.
Why 3rd September? –  This date marks the sinking of the Merchant Navy ship – S.S. Athenia in WWII – the very first casualty of the war – torpedoed by a German U-Boat, with the loss of 128 lives, within 10 hours of the declaration of war on 3 September 1939, by Neville Chamberlain and the outbreak of  World War II. The Merchancy Navy Asscociation aims to ensure the recognition of the Merchant Navy Veterans and the critical and strategic role of the Merchant Navy in times of war and conflict. The Red Ensign flag or “Red Duster” as it is affectionately known, is the recognised flag of the British Merchant Navy and has been flown by British merchant and passenger ships since 1854.

As per my post here, to commemorate 100 years of the Merchant Navy, and in remembrance of all those from various countries throughout the world that served in the Merchant Navy and who lost their lives during wars, conflicts and campaigns, Merchant Navy  Locomotive 35006 ‘Peninsular & Oriental SN Co’ will be running today on the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Steam Railway on Merchant Navy Day.

The headboard carried by 35006 to commemorate those in the Merchant Navy who fell during two World Wars and in subsequent conflicts (Andrew Marshall)

She was be suitably decorated for the day with a specially commissioned ‘Merchant Navy’ headboard (see left) and flying the Red Ensign flags for the occasion. The day started with a brief remembrance service at 9.30 am for members of the Merchant Navy Association, at Toddington station, before pulling the 10am departure for Cheltenham.

The Merchant Navy was formally known as the Mercantile Marine in the First World War.  During both world wars, Germany operated a policy of ‘unrestricted submarine warfare’, or sinking merchant vessels on sight. By the end of the First World War, more than 3,000 British flagged merchant and fishing vessels had been sunk and nearly 15,000 merchant seamen had died.

Following their service in the First World War, King George V bestowed the title of “Merchant Navy” on the British merchant shipping fleets, in 1928 he gave Edward, Prince of Wales the title of “Master of the Merchant Navy and Fishing Fleets”, more recently this title has been held by our current Queen Elizabeth II.

When the United Kingdom and the British Empire entered the Second World War in September 1939, George VI issued this message:

“In these anxious days I would like to express to all Officers and Men and in the British Merchant Navy and the British Fishing Fleets my confidence in their unfailing determination to play their vital part in defence. To each one I would say: Yours is a task no less essential to my people’s experience than that allotted to the Navy, Army and Air Force. Upon you the Nation depends for much of its foodstuffs and raw materials and for the transport of its troops overseas. You have a long and glorious history, and I am proud to bear the title “Master of the Merchant Navy and Fishing Fleets”. I know that you will carry out your duties with resolution and with fortitude, and that high chivalrous traditions of your calling are safe in your hands. God keep you and prosper you in your great task”.

Britain’s merchant fleet was the largest in the world during both world wars. In 1939, a third of the world’s merchant ships were British, and there were some 200,000 sailors. Many merchant seamen came from parts of the British Empire, such as India, Hong Kong and west African countries.
During the Second World War, 4,700 British-flagged ships were sunk.  German U-boats alone sank over 2,800 Allied ships. The United Kingdom alone suffered the loss of over 2,200 ships, which was 54% of the total Merchant Navy fleet at the outbreak of the Second World War.  32,000 merchant seafarers were killed aboard convoy vessels in the war, but along with the Royal Navy, the convoys successfully imported enough supplies to allow an Allied victory.

The Southern Railway Bullied Merchant Navy Class first built under wartime conditions in 1941 recognised the role of the Merchant Navy with all eventual 30 members of the class being named after the shipping lines and carried distinctive nameplates that included the flags of the shipping lines within. The c;lass were built with many Bullied novel features inclding chain driven valve gear encased within an oil bath and charatoristic air smoothed casing and Buleid-Firth-Bron wheels.  All examples of the Merchant Navy class were rebuilt along more conventional lines, with 35006 and 35028 Clan Line being the last two examples to be modified in 1959.
No. 11, 35011 is curently being ambitiously reurned to original condition by the General Steam Navigation Society of which, like for No.6, I am also  Sharehlder.

Although this post has given me the chance to share a few pictures of Bulleid Merchant Navy class locomotives and models, it is primarily to recognise and commemorate the sacrifices made on our behalf by merchant seafarers ‘We Will Remember Them’.

This months picture…

A line up of Bulleid pacifics on shed at Fisherton Sarum awaiting their next turn. The light pacifics are modified Hornby Models whilst the the Merchant Navy’s are Millholme kits.

Fisherton Sarum can be seen making the first of its only two public outings this month on the 14th / 15th this month at the Faversham Model Railway Club, exhibition at The Abbey School, London Road, Faversham. ME13 8RZ   The show is open between 10am and 4.30pm on the Saturday and 10am and 4pm on the Sunday. If you are able to, or planing to, attend the show please make sure you say hello!

As always full details of exhibition appearances of either Fisherton Sarum or Canute Road Quay can be found on my exhibition diary page here.

To commemorate 100 years of the Merchant Navy, and in remembrance of all those from various countries throughout the world that served in the Merchant Navy and who lost their lives during wars, conflicts and campaigns, Merchant Navy  Locomotive 35006 ‘Peninsular & Oriental SN Co’ will be running on the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Steam Railway on Merchant Navy Day – Tuesday 3rd September 2019.

35006 in the sunshine at Toddington

Locomotove No.6,  which was built in 1941 for the Southern Railway and formally named after the shipping company P&O in 1942 – with the unveiling of a grand nameplate on the side of the locomotive,  is based at Toddington station on the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Steam Railway which runs between Cheltenham Race Course and Broadway in the Cotswolds.

35006 has the signal off at Cheltenham Racecourse (ready to run around rather than head further south)

No.6  will be suitably decorated for the day with a specially commissioned ‘Merchant Navy’ headboard and flying the Red Ensign flags for the occasion. It is intended to have a brief remembrance service at 9.30 am for members of the Merchant Navy Association, at Toddington station, before pulling the 10am departure for Cheltenham.

Following many years of lobbying to bring about official recognition of the sacrifices made by merchant seafarers in the two world wars and since, Merchant Navy Day became an official day of remembrance on 3 September 2000.

Since 2000, Merchant Navy Day on 3rd September has honoured the brave men and women who kept our ‘island nation’ afloat during both World Wars, and celebrated our dependence on modern day merchant seafarers who are responsible for 95% of the UK’s imports.

The Merchancy Navy Asscociation aims to ensure the recognition of the Merchant Navy Veterans and the critical and strategic role of the Merchant Navy in times of war and conflict.
Why 3rd September? –  This date marks the sinking of the Merchant Navy ship – S.S. Athenia in WWII – the very first casualty of the war – torpedoed by a German U-Boat, with the loss of 128 lives, within 10 hours of the declaration of war on 3 September 1939, by Neville Chamberlain and the outbreak of  World War II.
Anyone who wants to come along and see and photograph the train is welcome to turn up at Toddington – entry is free. Anyone wanting to travel, this is a normal service train,  just buy a ticket and jump on board, all are welcome

This is the second in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  After my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, perhaps to the docks of Ipswich or Yarmouth,  utilising the lovely Model Rail magazine limited edition ex Great Eastern Railway J70 class 0-6-0 tram engines

Two USA tanks 30064 and 30067

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…)

USA tank 30067 continues to shunt

It therefore allows me to change the location and era with different rolling stock, vehicles and details.

USA tank 30067 is joined by B4 30089

In this case we have stayed at Canute Road Quay‘s intended setting but time travelled to a time when wartime rationing had at long last come to an end by moving into the British Railways late 1950s era.

30089 joins 30067 on shed between turns

Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

USA tank 30064 adds a splash of colour to proceedings

In this case we still see the excellent Model Rail Magazine USA tanks, produced by Bachmann,  still handling the mainstay of the work, with a slight reference to the past due to a visiting ex LSWR Adams B4, by Dapol, all British Railways liveries.

The change in period also sees slightly more modern wagons and vehicles appearing, along a few older ones that have managed to get a repaint to the latest British Railways livery.

30067 catches the light on the quayside

At least, we are, unlike my first ‘Making Quay Changes’ post back to the Southern albeit Southern Region.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay will also still be set in its usual location but again time travelling, but what era will it be…?

 

 

This months picture…

USA 0-6-0T No. 68 shunts on the quayside at Canute Road Quay. She is a Model Rail Magazine commissioned loco by Bachmann.

PS. Happy Birthday to my Mum on the 27th this month (my brother on the 16th and my nephew Alexander on the 26th)

Yesterday evening, 13th July, saw the annual members day event with a dedicated special train purely for members and shareholders of the 35006 Society. It was a chance to ride behind 35006 Peninsular & Oriental S. N. Co on a private train after No.6 had been in service on the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Steam Railway  during the day.

35006 backs on to the Members train

Relections from the cab #1

I was also fortunate as Shareholder to have the chance of a ride in the cab, see video below, for the part of the trip.

She certainly looked splendid and powerful in the evening light with the wonderful patina of having worked service trains during the day. Once coaled and coupled to the members train she ran non stop to Cheltenham racecourse station. Having run around she took the train tender first, again back past Toddington to the wonderfully recreated, Broadway station.

Reflections from the cab #2

I was lucky enough to ride in the cab between Toddington and Braodway. The evening ended as the sun set returning to Toddington. The 14 miles end to end gives a nice 28 mile round trip, and a couple of nice gradients thrown into the mix,  with some great views across the Cotswolds.

I was able to take a few pictures from the cab, getting a few reflections in the glass and tender sides (as we were running tender first for that part of the journey) hence the title pun of this post.

Stanway Viaduct from the cab of No.6

It also gave the chance to experience the views from the impressive Stanway Viaduct, just to the North of Toddington, this viaduct is approximately 210 yards long, crosses the valley at its highest point at just over 50 feet and each of the 15 spans are 36 feet. It is on a gentle 1 in 150 gradient heading north and on a gentle 80 chain curve.

The reputation for Bulleids to make steam was certainly evident with a low fire of good quality welsh steam coal, steam pressure was easily maintained, as it never dropped below 235 psi for the duration of my cab ride, despite the relatively full train, of members and shareholders, made up of eight BR Mark One coaches.

Coad, fire and water make steam pressure 235psi on the dial

The safety valves were just feathering for most of the trip despite the fireman keeping topping up the boiler to its near full limit.  The ride was very smooth, albeit at an average of around 25mph showing on the speedometer, on the still pretty new excellent permanent way to Broadway

It was certainly a great evening, including the cab ride as well, enjoying a picnic on board with my Mum and Dad. No.6 looked great as always and was running superbly and a credit to the 35006 Locomotive Society and the running staff of the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Steam Railway

It was also great to be able to get up close to 35006 and hopefully some of the pictures illustrating this post shows the impressiveness of her and also the impressive level of restoration and continued maintenance that has gone into this complex piece of engineering Bulleid Brilliance (with a little bit of Jarvis thrown in, I will concede).

No.6 runs round at Cheltenham Racecourse

The setting sun seen through the cab of No6 at Broardway

See my page here on how you can help keep, in any small way, No.6 up and running. 

 

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