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Although not the usual time period for my blog, I certainly remember the Class 50s on the Waterloo to Exeter line albeit not in this latest livery.

The Kernow Model Rail Centre have today announced they have commissioned Dapol to produce the GBRf Class 50s in N Gauge.

Defiance and Hercules at Eastleigh 20th March 2020 (Picture copyright and courtesy C Trerise)

50 007 “Hercules” and 50 049 “Defiance” were unveiled on 20th March 2019 at Eastleigh following their repainting into GBRf colours.  50 007 was revealed to have 50 014 “Warspite” on one side, much to the delight of Tim Shoveller and Darren Ward who unveiled the change of identity!  The Kernow Model Rail Centre model will reflect this dual-identity, as well as faithfully re-creating the small but important differences between the livery of the two locomotives.

GBRf worked closely with the Class 50 Alliance, the owners of 50 007 and 50 049, in enabling a return to the mainline for their locomotives in 2017 and subsequently through a programme of railtours during 2018 as part of the 50th anniversary celebrations of the Class 50s.

The decision to repaint the locomotives into the striking new livery was a recognition of the developing relationship between the two organisations and marked a new chapter in the story of the Class 50s.  Over the past couple of years, GBRf has invested in a programme of driver training to enable Class 50 operation over most of the UK rail network.

The repaints were carried out by Arlington Fleet Services at Eastleigh. The first outing for the GBRf-liveried Class 50s was on Saturday 23rd March when they worked Pathfinder Tours’ Teminator-Phoenixed railtour from London Paddington to Penzance and return to Waterloo.  This marked 25th years since the final BR operated Class 50 railtour over the same route, The Terminator, which was also promoted by Pathfinder.

Following the repaints, the locomotives have been available to operate selected GBRf trains on a ‘spot-hire’ basis. This work includes movement of locomotives between heritage railway gala events, and future railtours. The locomotives will continue to be based at the Severn Valley Railway, but will have easy access to the national network, thanks to the 24-hour connection at Kidderminster,

Expected in mid 2021, the price for the pack (both models motorised) will be £249.99 for DCC Ready, £299.99 for DCC Fitted and £449.99 for DCC Sound Fitted.

In addition to the above Dapol have this week also announced three new Class 50 liveries as part of its main range, due mid 2021. Like the Kernow Model Rail Centre versions these will be their Next Generation Diesel models, with entirely re-designed chassis and electronics and incorporate a new iron core 5 pole motor.

Liveries announced, including DCC fitted versions, are as follows:

  • Class 50 Defiance 50149 Railfreight Grey Refurbished
  • Class 50 Ajax 50046 Large Logo Refurbished
  • Class 50 Resolution 50018 Late NSE Refurbished

Also announced this week is a new batch of their ex SR Van U / BR Covered Carriage Truck (CCT),  that is being released at the end of this year in: SR Olive, BR(S) Green and BR crimson and BR Blue.

As I advised in my recent Covid, exhibitions, mental health and life changes post, in an attempt to restore my modelling mojo whilst on furlough I started to build a number of the wagon kits that I had added to the to do later pile over the last few years.

The Diagram 1410 Covered Goods Wagons awaiting painting

The crispness of the Cambrian Models mouldings can be clearly seen in with this Diagram 1316 open

The finished painted and lettered wagons in pre and post 1936 liveries.

The Diagram 1426 shows of its height against a low roofed Diagram 1410

The kits were all from the excellent Cambrian Models range and comprised of:

  • 4 off ex LSWR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1410
  • 2 off ex SECR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1426
  • 1 off ex LSWR 8 plank 12t Open Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1316

These kits are of an excellent standard, with crisp mouldings and assemble quite easily once you have got your head around some of the various options, mainly around the type and number of brakes fitted. As usual I refer to the bibles for Southern wagon builders the “Illustrated History of Southern Wagons” the four volumes are now sadly out of print but are worth tracking down if you don’t already have access to copies.

Although I follow the well written and detailed instructions; I tend to replace the plastic buffer heads with metal replacements from the Alan Gibson range or similar to give additional durability. I also add some cut lead sheet to the underside of the chassis to bring the weight up to approximately 30 grams (around one ounce for older readers) as this improves running. I always fit brass top hat pin point bearings into the axle boxes and use Alan Gibson wheels.
I tend to purchase these kits, wheels etc. either at shows, when we could, or online from H&A Models whom always provide a friendly and efficient service and in these times it’s always good to help and continue to support such excellent traders.

The Hornby Diagram 1543 ‘New’ van showing the incorrect brown and oversize Tare lettering height

The paint dries in the oven

B4 No. 82 runs around the two repainted Hornby Diagram 1543 brake vans.

A very busy scene at Canute Road Quay as all the wagon builds have come to visit

In addition to the above wagons, whilst on a roll, I have finally got round to repainting the two Hornby ex LSWR 20t Warner ‘New’ diagram 1543 brake vans that arrived at the start of year. Whist excellent models the SR versions in this first batch were not finished in the correct shade of SR Brown, also the Tare lettering was incorrectly the same size as the wagon number when it should be smaller. A nice touch by Hornby  is that they provide a separate beautifully printed plate for the “Not to work between Tonbridge and West St. Leonards via Battle” in addition to it being pre printed on the wagon side, so I have affixed these to the repaints.

For all my wagons I tend to follow the same painting process:

  • Firstly for the kit builds I give a dusting of Halford plastic primer from an aerosol ‘rattle’ can
  • I then brush paint the base colour, I prefer to paint two thin coats rather than one heavy coat.
  • I always help dry the paintwork in a warmed oven (set to less than 50 deg and the door kept open, luckily, I don’t need to ask anyone permission first!).
  • In most cases I use lettering from the HMRS Pressfix transfer range and I use a mix of pre (large SR) and post 1936 (small SR) styles to give some variety.
  • Finally, I apply Railmatch Satin Varnish from a rattle can to fix the lettering and even the finish.

Well I said finally, but actually the wagons now await degrees of weathering that I tend to do as a batch and still have to do so for those shown here.

 

Published today is the September issue of Hornby Magazine no.159. included with the main magazine is a 32 page supplement “Modelling Guide – Southern Region.”

The initial 6 page article settinging the scene and historical background to the Southern Region has been penned by yours truly!
It was quite a challenge to keep such a wide subject within the word count and give an overview of the Southern, but hopefully I have managed to provide a suitable introduction…

The guide also includes useful articles such as:

  • typical Southern Region train formations that can be modelled using ready to run stock,
  • an explanation of the Southern Region Engine Head Signals and some examples of their use,
  • 20 Southern top tips highlighting the signatures of the Southern and how to model them, including EMUs, concrete, pull push, third rail,named trains, art deco / odeon architecture and more
  • a comprehensive motive power survey detailing all the ready to run locomotives currently available or due for release soon.

Hopefully the Magazine that also looks again at editor MIke Wild’s own extensive Southern Region layout Twelve Trees Junction, that I had the pleasure to operate at exhibitions, and the modellers guide will be of interest and use for modellers of the Southern as well as the Southern Region.

 

Bachmann Europe advised at the start of the year, before the advent of Covid-19 a change to the way they make product announcements and that they would take place every quarter revealing new items that would be actually available in the following three months. The aim was that they would hold a product showcase event for members of their Collectors Club. Whilst Covid-19 has stopped the physical showcase event taking place Collectors Club members were able to get a sneak virtual preview of today’s announcement earlier this morning. Although no stand out new tooling has been announced we do see the launch of a new brand.

A new brand – EFE Rail

Bachmann Europe launch its all-new brand EFE Rail. The led by a new motorised version of the popular EFE 1:76 scale (OO) London Underground Tube Train. This much requested model is joined by a number of other Great British Model Railways to complete the launch range for EFE Rail.
The diecast model range Exclusive First Editions (EFE) has been part of the Bachmann Europe portfolio since 2016 and the new EFE Rail brand is an extension of this brand and sees an initial range includes numerous OO and N scale locomotives and wagons which have been produced in collaboration with third parties, such as Kernow Model Rail Centre and Heljan, to make these products accessible via Bachmann Europe Stockists for the first time.

The EFE Rail Motorised 1938 stock

The range in 00 initially includes six versions of the J94 0-6-0t  (reworked with a new coreless motor by The Kernow Model Rail Centre), four Class 35 Hymeks, and a number of JIA and PBA Wagons (also in conjunction with The Kernow Model Rail Centre.)
The N gauge range includes 12 versions of the Class 17 Clayton and 14t Mermaid side tipping wagon.
The majority of the new EFE Rail items are due to be released later this month with more to be added to the range in due course.

Bachmann 

The LMS 10000

The main new additions to the range include a class 40 with modified tooling and sound, and relevant to BR(s) modellers the missing LMS twin adding 10000 to run alongside the previously announced 10001 and will be available in BR Black with the early emblem.
A number of Class 66s, BR VBA and VDA wagons,   and also sound fitted Midland 1P 0-4-4 tanks (even as a southern modeller I can’t help but think they are delightful little engines!) top up the range.
Included within the August expected deliveries are the three versions of the Class 414 2-HAP 2-Car EMU 6061 BR (SR) Green, 6063 BR Blue & Grey and 4308 BR Network SouthEast that were first announced back in 2016.
Expected in October are the six versions of the 12t SR Box vans including both Plywood bodied, bauxite pristine and weathered; and 2+2 planking in LMS grey, BR grey weathered, bauxite weathered and GWR Grey.

Graham Farish

The Graham Farish range sees only the addition of two new livery Mk1 coaches including the Brake Composite in BR Intercity Charter livery. The brand new tooled LMS 8F will arrive this month along with the class 170/3 2 car DMU in South West Trains livery. The previously announced BR Mk1 Tourist 2nd open coach in BR(s) Green will arrive this quarter along with three versions of the SR 12t box van in SR Brown, LMS grey and BR bauxite.

Woodland Scenics and Scenecraft

Scenecraft N Gauge wooden engine shed

These ranges continue to grow with new additions to the woodland scenic range including grass tufts, a range of fencing types and different types of pre cabled wooden power poles and lines.
The N gauge Scenecraft range is further expanded with some scaled down versions of the 00 models and the addition of a wooden engine shed with cream and green paintwork that would not look out of place on a small Southern branchline.
The 00 ranges sees the reintroduction of the popular quayside stone walls.

The Bachmann announcement video can be viewed here and the full range and announcements can be seen on the Bachmann Europe website here.

This months picture…

Adams 0-6-0 0395 class number 3441, sits in the headshunt at Fisherton Sarum. She is built from a DJH kit.

PS. Happy Birthday to my Mum on the 27th this month, my brother on the 16th and my nephew Alexander on the 26th

I will start by apologising that this post is not really about model railways (but a little creeps in along with 12″ to the foot railways!)

Restrictions due to COVID19 has prevented model railway clubs and societies having their usual meetings, let alone model railway exhibitions from going ahead. This meant that appearances of Canute Road Quay at shows including the Epsom and Ewell MRC show back in April fell by the wayside. This week I was advised that the Beckenham and West Wickham MRC show on 17th October has also understandably been cancelled, this along with previously announced cancellation of the excellent Chiltern Model Railway Association show in Stevenage in January next year means Canute Road Quay will not be leaving the cottage for some time. Details of any exhibitions booked for next year and still at the time of writing going ahead can always be found on my Exhibition Diary page here.
The loss of these exhibitions is understandable but a great shame, although a number of virtual shows have taken place its not the same and for most model railway clubs and societies they were an important source of income, so once they are back up and running hopefully next year, please support your local show!

A tease of a “Making Quay Changes” post to come

A view of the cottage in my “view from the cottage series of images

My local Jay sits atop my LSWR boundary marker

It does mean that I have been able to do a photoshoots for my Making Quay Changes series which I hope that you are enjoying, there are at least three more in the pipeline so watch this space, and I welcome any requests.

Like many people I have been furloughed since the start of April and whilst I initially kept myself busy creating a new look and feel along with writing many pages of new content for the General Steam Navigation Locomotive Restoration Society’s  website that can be seen here, check out the History & Archive pages along with the Technical and Education Centre pages. If you really want to look smart whilst helping support the project we have a new clothing range available here.
As restrictions eased we have been able to start our working sessions on No.11 again which has been good both physically and mentally.

As lockdown rolled into May and beyond, as experienced by many, keeping ones headspace on the straight and narrow was sometimes a challenge.
I remembered the adage “it’s ok to not be ok” and “seeking help is a positive not a negative step”, people are there to assist, and your local front line NHS such as your GP is a great starting point, mine was fantastic!

I took the opportunity to make use exercise time to enjoy the lovely part of the Chiltern Hills that my cottage is set in and undertake more photography, ranging from: scenic views, sunsets, the splendid Red Kites that now once again grace the area, other birds, visiting animals and some arty views and angles to take in texture, foliage and clouds etc.
I posted many of the photographs on my twitter feed @grahammuz with the hashtag #viewfromthecottage but have now also created a gallery of some of my favourites on my gallery page here, check them out if you have a few minutes spare.

Catching up on kit builds

I also managed once the mojo had returned to catch up on some simple model making and build a few wagon kits that had been in the will do sometime pile for well quite some time. They are at the painting stage now and will likely appear in a workbench post soon.

In other news after 15 years in the Road Safety and Traffic Management, I decided to apply for voluntary redundancy, so am now in furlough for my notice period that finishes at the end of September.
I then start a new job that by of a tease before it is officially announced will be in… wait for it… the model railway industry!
It’s all pretty exciting really and will definitely improve my work life balance and I am really looking forward to getting my teeth into the new role, so again watch this space…

In the meantime stay safe and well, both physically and mentally, it’s good to talk!

Dapol have today announced, or in reality re-announced, details of new tooling Maunsell High Window coaches in N gauge.  This is an expansion of the previously released low window versions. They will initially be produced in SR lined olive green and further liveries will be phased in to expand the range.

Three new tooled models cover a six compartment Brake Third (BTK), a Corridor Third (TK), a Corridor Composite (CK) and a Corridor First (FK).

Dapol SR BTK high window

Dapol SR CK high window

Dapol SR TK high window

The proposed releases, all SR Lined Olive Green are as follows:

  • 2P-014-001 Four Coach Set 193 comprising of BTKs nos. 3735 [sic should be 3758] / 3739 and CKs nos. 5640 and 5641 – £124.95
  • 2P-014-002 Six Coach Set 456 comprising of BTKs nos. 4083 / 4084, CK no. 5172, FKs nos. 7398 / 7399 and TK no. 837 – £186.95
  • 2P-014-003 Corridor Brake Third No. 3730 [sic not a Brake Third as their number range started 3732] – £31.95 ea
  • 2P-014-004 Corridor Composite No. 5635 – £31.95 ea
  • 2P-014-005 Corridor First No. 7228 – £31.95 ea
  • 2P-014-006 Corridor Third – £31.95 ea

The images shown are the initial Engineering Prototypes and for illustration only,  Dapol advise that they have already received livery samples and amendments returned to the factory (I hope the BTK number 3735 above is a typo as it should be number 3738, and also the proposed number of the loose BTK 3730 is not a BTK ) with production started and delivery expected by quarter 4 this year.

This is the third in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s. In this post we remain in the Southampton Docks but in the 1920s heading into the 1930s.

Canute Road Quay in mid 1920s ‘Guernsey’ passes ‘Caen’ showing the two Southampton Docks liveries

‘Caen’ passes ‘Trueville’ both heading into the 1930s

Shunting continues on Canute Road Quay

No.88 in early SR livery visits the Docks shed as ‘Guernsey’ shunts

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) It therefore allows me to change the location and era with different rolling stock, vehicles and details.

In this case we have stayed at Canute Road Quay‘s intended setting but time travelled to a time between the wars moving from the roaring 1920s to the uncertain 1930s with the prospect of peace being unsettled and ruining the phrase “the war to end all wars”

Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case we still see the lovely range of Dapol B4 class 0-4-0 tanks bringing a splash of colour to the scene with the early Southampton Docks lined green livery being replaced during the 1920s with the possibly more familiar lined brown livery that was maintained until the B4 tanks were replaced at the Docks by the USA tanks after the second world war. We also see in this period colourful private owner wagons (before they were nationally pooled and unkempt during WW2).

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay may or may not be set in its usual location, so where and what era will it be…?

 

 

Following on from my recent Talking Stock #38 The Adams B4 tanks post that included a brief history of the prototype and also a review of the recent range of Dapol ready to run models, I have added a few of these to my fleet for Canute Road Quay and therefore renamed and numbered to suit my preferred modelling period.

In all these instances I have not repainted the original model but used my time served method of a good quality enamel thinners applied to the original model printing and then after a soak of around 5 minutes or so rubbing off with a thinners soaked cotton bud. This does leave a shiny finish where the rubbing has been carried, but this is a good surface to apply fresh decals to.

I then leave the model to fully dry in a ventilated area for a day or so to ensure that no traces of the thinners remain. I then applied new decals from a number of sources depending on the model being created.

No. 82 has been repainted from no. 30084  Note the tool boxes have also been relocated to the slightly further forward position as per No.82

No. 89 Trueville

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition

For standard Southern Railway post war lettering I use Pressfix transfers from the HMRS Southern Bulleid Sheet 10 as per my backdating of No 30084 to No. 82. Note also that for this identity change I also relocated the tank top tool boxes slightly further forward as per No.82 in real life.

For ‘Trueville’ that utilised No. 90 ‘Caen’ as the base model in Southampton Docks lined brown livery. I used modified Pressfix SR coach lettering, to form all the required letters that I applied individually, also from the HMRS Bulleid sheet 10.

When Normandy left the docks in 1946 she was repainted in to post war black livery at Eastleigh and instead of regaining her number 96, she retained her name but it was applied in Bulleid post war ‘Sunshine’ style. This was obtained from Cambridge Custom Transfers via friend and excellent modeller Matt Wickham. I used the BR version of 30096 as the basis for this backdating.

Once the decals have been applied I spray with Railmatch Satin varnish from a rattle can to both seal the decals and restore a consistent finish, I then like to brush paint the smokebox, chimney, cab roof and cylinders matt black prior to weathering etc.

For those wanting to renumber BR versions, or simply wnating to enhance the fact that Dapol only print the smokebox door number plate directly onto the door with no representation of the number plate, etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby. 

Hopefully this demonstrates how quick and easy renumbering and renaming can be, as we can not expect a manufacturer to produce every number and variant that we might want. Should a full repaint be required then I have also adopted a reasonably quick and simple process and this is described in my Workbench Wittering #3 post here.

 

 

The Bulleid Leader, a desperately sought after model, finally coming to life.

KR Models currently producing a RTR ‘GT3’ Gas Turbine, and taking expressions of interest in the ‘Fell’ have today announced the following:

“Leader was a class of experimental 0-6-0+0-6-0
articulated steam locomotive, 5 were planned but only one was completed, and was produced in the United Kingdom. It looked like a ‘new’ generation of diesel but was actually a steam powered loco. The Leader project was part of Bulleid’s desire to modernise the steam locomotive based on experience gained with the Southern Railway’s fleet of electric stock.”

Livery options are currently stating “brushed aluminium and BR Green” (See my notes below), but expressions of interest can be made on there website here https://krmodels.co.uk/collections/…/products/bulleid-leader

A few points to note:

The intention was in fact, and signed off by the board, to be a class of 30, but only the frames for the first 5 were laid down. 
The lined green livery was only a figment of the painting artist.
36001 ex works only carried 3 variations of the grey livery
Mixed traffic black was certainly discussed and 36001 was recorded inside the works in plain black but when she left the works was in unlined grey.

More information about the Bulleid Leader can be found in my Talking Stock #8 post here

My model of the Bulleid Leader in its very first livery before trials commenced
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