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Whilst many when asked about Southampton Docks will generally immediately think of the ex LSWR / Southern Railway docks with ex LSWR B4 0-4-0 tanks and later SR USA tanks, however there were a myriad of rail served private docks and wharves in the area including inner and outer docks and those along the River Itchen such as Dibles Wharf, Notham, Britannia and Victoria wharf,  many of which had their own locomotives.

The recent advent of ready to run industrial tanks, that it has to be said are pretty cute really, such as the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t and Hornby W4 Peckett 0-4-0t has opened up a few quick win options for use on Canute Road Quay. One thing I like about many of the locomotives used in such private wharves and quaysides is their use of dumb, usually basic wooden blocks, buffers.

The modified Hattons Andrew Barclay simmers outside the quayside officers at Canute Road Quay

The process for fitting the dumb buffers is to remove the model buffers which are either one piece inserted into the buffer beam or heads and moulded shanks, as per the Hornby Peckett and cutting off the shanks. In both cases any raised detailing on the buffer beam such as rivets etc is filed smooth to enable the replacement wooden dumb buffers that comprise of shaped plastic rectangular section to be glued in place. These are then painted with a grey weathered wood colour paint.

The Hornby Peckett modified with an open cab as well as dumb buffers on Canute Road Quay

With the Hornby W4 Peckett I went one stage further than just replacing the buffers but modifying to one of the open cab versions of the W8 and as per a picture I have seen of such a locomotive at Dibles Wharf in Southampton (I can not post this photograph as I do not own the copyright).

Work in Progress on the W4, Dumb buffers shaped fitted, the cab upper rear removed, and new top ledge fitted and the first brass handrail in place

The cab rear on the Hornby model is a separate moulding, so perhaps an open cab version is on the cards in due course, and I carefully cut the top half away just above the strengthening bar. You can choose to keep the original plastic handrails that extend to the underside of the cab roof but I chose for strength purposes to replace with 0.45mm brass rod. I then added using think plastic micro-strip a top ledge to the now lower cab rear panel.  A crew member has also been fitted.

Dry brush weathering is underway, picture is before the use of a cotton bud to remove some of the dirt

Both models have been weathered in this case using dry brushing techniques, rather than airbrush or weathering powders, and then in many places the weathering rubbed off using a cotton bud. The colours used include: weathered wood on the dumb buffers, brake block dust on the brake blocks, dark rust, roof dirt (essentially dark grey). Area such as the tank and cab sides have the dry brushing removed more than for the example the boiler top where more of a build up of soot etc builds up.

Another view of the Peckett W4 on Canute Road Quay

The modifications I feel give an added dimension and alternative to the out of the box model, and the open cab Hornby W4 Peckett shows off very well the amount of details that Hornby have incorporated within the cab itself.

These industrials and the usual Southern Railway locomotives can be seen at Canute Road Quay’s forthcoming exhibitions appearances: firstly,  the Worthing Model Railway Club exhibition at Durrington High School, The Boulevard, Worthing, West Sussex, BN13 1LA. that is taking place on the weekend of 29th and 30th September 2018; and Secondly, Saturday 3rd November 2018 at Wycrail 18 organised by my own model railway society the High Wycombe and District MRS, being held at Cressex Community School, Cressex Road, High Wycombe, HP12 4UD .  If you are attending either show please drop by and say hello.

Bachmann first announced the introduction of these ex London Brighton and South Coast Railway H2 Class 4-4-2 Locomotives back in August 2013. Although its taken a while have they captured the graceful looks of these lovely lovely Marsh / Billinton locomotives and overcome the challenges of such a wheel arrangement with tight clearances, certainly yes. This review could easily be summed up in three words “it’s very pretty”.

Bachmann 31-920 No. 2421 ‘South Foreland’ in Maunsell lined Southern livery

The review is is a version of one I have written for British Railway Modelling magazine the electronic version of which is published today with printed copies to be available next week. The pictures that accompany this post are copyright and courtesy of A York / BRM magazine.

The first H1 Class Atlantics were built to haul express trains between London and Brighton. They were designed by D.E. Marsh, who had been deputy to the Chief Mechanical Engineer of the Great Northern Railway, H.A. Ivatt, for 10 years until he was promoted to the top job at Brighton in January 1905. Such was the urgency for express motive power on the Brighton line that Marsh, with the full support of his former chief, borrowed a set of Doncaster drawings and made a few amendments. The result was five H1 Class locomotives which were built December 1905 and February 1906.

ex LBSC H2 Class Atlantic (picture courtesy of Bachmann)

The second batch known as the H2 Class, as depicted in this Bachmann model, although essentially to Marsh’s design it was modified by his deputy L. Billinton. These modifications included superheating, larger cylinders, a reduced boiler pressure (although this was later increased between 1936 – 1940 up to 200psi to match the H1 class) and probably and the most visible aspect being the running plate which maintained a continuous line above driving wheels and cylinders.
Six H2 Class locomotives were built at Brighton Works between 1911 and 1912 and remained on front line Brighton express work until the arrival of the King Arthur Class 4-6-0s in 1925. They were named by the SR publicity department during 1925/6 after geographical features on the South Coast. The Atlantics then continued to operate other express trains and boat trains to the ferries at Newhaven until the outbreak of World War 2 in 1939.
The class continued to work secondary services after the war but there was less work for them and some were put into store. The first H2 Class withdrawal was No. 32423 ‘The Needles’ which took place in May 1949. The last to survive was No. 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ which was withdrawn on 24th April 1958. The Bluebell Railway is currently progressing well with its project to reconstruct a Brighton H2 Atlantic, utilising a suitable ex GN boiler as the basis. (see http://www.bluebell-railway.co.uk/bluebell/locos/atlantic/ for more details)

Although originally built to the ‘Brighton’ generous loading gauge the H2 Class were subsequently modified by the Southern Railway to its composite loading gauge between 1935 and 1937 with a revised cab, cut down boiler fittings and the whistle position relocated away from being on the cab roof.

A higher 3/4 view of No 2421

Bachmann have initially released two versions:

  • 31-920        H2 Class Atlantic 4-4-2 2421 ‘South Foreland’ SR Olive Green (note: was originally announced as being 2426 ‘St. Alban’s Head’
  • 31-921        H2 Class Atlantic 4-4-2 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ BR Black Early livery

The H1 as planned in LBSC Livery for comparison with the later H2 Class. Picture courtesy and copyright Bachmann

Bachmann subsequently announced in January 2017 that they are producing in parallel the earlier H1 Class although these are still to appear.

A 3/4 rear view of No. 2421 with the original Brighton loading gauge cab and boiler fittings, and open coal rails

The 31-920 version number 2421 as modelled by Bachmann is in the condition she was in post renumbering from B421 in 1931 and prior to February 1937 when she received both the SR composite loading gauge changes and being fitted with a Maunsell type superheater and therefore receiving snifting valves on the smokebox.
The 31-921 version as number 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ in BR Black Early livery incorporates the loading gauge changes, revised front lamp iron positions and filled in coal rails on the tender.

The model matches extremely well the dimensions, look, details and elegant lines of the prototype when compared to drawings and contemporary pictures.

A close up showing the cab of No. 2421

Separately applied fittings to the body includes handrails, pipework, smokebox dart, the characteristic LSBSC lamp irons on the front buffer beam. The open cab is well detailed with a number of separately applied parts and nicely painted with pipework, gauges, valves, regulator, reverser and tip up seats all represented. The tender also includes open coal rails, fire iron stands and a cast metal full coal load to add additional weight. Other than those on the buffer beam itself the middle and top lamp irons on the tender body are moulded rather than separate fitted items.

A view of the innards showing the 3 pole motor located in the firebox area and the location of the 21 pin DCC socket in the tender with spadce for a 23mm speaker behind

The diecast metal locomotive chassis is fitted with a 3 pole motor, located within the firebox driving the rear driver axle via a gear tower although no flywheel is fitted. The boiler is packed with weight to ensure good adhesion of the four coupled driving wheels which themselves are like the prototype impressively close, although this has been achieved by them being very slightly under the scale 6’7½”.

The joggle in the connecting rod is clearly visible in this view of 2421

Due to the tight clearances between the driving wheels, footsteps, cylinders and front bogie the connecting rod has an obvious joggle in it, which is probably more obvious in its pristine finish due to reflections than it would be if slightly weathered. This is of a course a something of a compromise to ensure the ability to run round round second radius curves, but other options such as having to leave off the middle set of steps for those tighter curves is I believe a worse option.

The graceful lines of the H2 class are very apparent

Both the front bogie and the rear trailing axle are slightly sprung, the latter being a pony truck style with plenty of swing allowed between the fixed dummy side frames.
Running on my sample was smooth and quiet across all speed ranges and in a test she hauled 8 Bachmann Mk1 coaches on the level with relative ease and no wheel slip on starting.
Electrical pickups are fitted to all driving wheels and the front and rear tender wheels, the tender is permanently connected to the locomotive via a fixed length drawbar (although the locating pin on the tender is slightly adjustable to reduce the loco to tender gap) and a four-wired connection that is plugged into the tender.
A 21 Pin socket is located in the tender along with space for a 23mm diameter sound speaker, a speaker mount bracket and screws are included within the accessory pack.
Brake blocks and factory fitted brake rigging are fitted to both locomotive and tender (although the latter along with the first wheelset will require to be removed to enable the tender body to be removed to access the DCC socket) with the locomotive chassis also featuring sand boxes and fine sand pipes that complete the chassis details.

Yet another view of No. 2421 just to show how pretty the the H2 class is

The model matches extremely well the dimensions, look, details and elegant lines of the prototype when compared to drawings and contemporary photographs.
Separately applied fittings to the body includes handrails, pipework, smokebox dart, the characteristic LSBSC lamp irons on the front buffer beam. The open cab is well detailed with a number of separately applied parts and nicely painted with pipework, gauges, valves, regulator, reverser and tip up seats all represented.
The tender also includes open coal rails, fire iron stands and a metal moulded full coal load to add additional weight. Other than those on the buffer beam itself the middle and top lamp irons on the tender body are moulded rather than separate fitted items.

An accessory pack is included which includes: vacuum pipes, steam pipes, engine head signal discs, a nice option of open or closed cab doors and the cab weather sheet uprights. Also included are cosmetic screw couplings and front guard irons if no tension lock coupling is fitted and front cylinder corner infills for fitting if being used as a static display model. It is good to see that the supplied comprehensive owners information sheet details the positioning of all the separate items.

The livery application for the Southern Railway Maunsell Olive Green with white and black lining is well applied including the rear trailing truck side frames (although not all the class has these frames so lined). The tender frames are correctly plain black. The lubricator boxes atop of the splashers are picked out in brass and the cast nameplates and cabside number plates are neatly printed although a nice touch from Bachmann is that etched name and number plates are included for the owner to fit.

The introduction of these elegant looking locomotives with their distinct character, being of pre-grouping origin, with further future livery possibilities and details, that were long lived are certainly to prove popular with LBSR, SR and BR(s) modellers and gives Bachmann options for a variety of further liveries in due course, including LBSC Umber, SR malachite Green, wartime black, BR numbered malachite green and of BR lined black, as it is understood that provision has been included within the tooling for a number of the details changes that took place over time.

 

 

 

As has been the case in previous years the team at Bachmann have provided the media, and Bachamnn Collectors Club members, with a mid-term update on work in progress across all the many stages of the manufacturing process from: research, Drawing office CAD, Tool room, Engineering Prototypes samples, livery artwork, production and being shipped. This post is a quick summary of the status of those models of a Southern Railway / British Railways Southern Region flavour. Although some items have been a long time coming, what can be seen is that catch up / progress is being made. Click on  the linked text to get more information on the details of each item from my post on the original announcement.

Bachmann 00

The EP1 of the 2HAP EMU. Picture copyright and courtesy of Bachmann.

The long-awaited ex LBSC H2 Class 4-4-2 Atlantic is very imminent, being released in two versions No. 2421 ‘South Foreland’ SR Olive Green and No. 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ BR Black Early livery. I have been fortunate to have a review sample in my possession and will be posting a review in the next week or so, watch this space.  Being produced alongside the H2 Class is the earlier H1 Class version initially as No. 39 ‘La France’ in LBSCR livery, which is also being shipped.

Within the drawing room are the many permutations, 5 types, of the Bulleid coaches along with the 4BEP (Class 410) EMU.

A front end close up of the 2HAP EP1. Picture copyright and courtesy A York

The 2HAP (Class 414) EMU is at the first Engineering Prototype (EP1) stage and as from the accompanying pictures is looking the part.  Three livery versions will initially be released being: BR green livery, BR blue & grey livery and Network South East livery. At the second Engineering Prototype stage is the 158/159 DMU with with the  3 car 159 Class to be released as No. 159013 in Network South East livery.

Graham Farish N

Recently shipped have been the four versions of the Bulleid coaches in BR(s) malachite green that together, BTK – TK – CK- BTK, create four coach set s84.

The lovely ex SECR Birdcage coaches, already released in 00, scaled down for N gauge and being released in SECR Wellington Brown, Southern Railway Olive Green and BR Crimson liveries are now approved for production.

The Class 450 and Class 319 EMUs are in the drawing office, whilst the 3 versions of the ex SECR C Class 0-6-0 as No. 271 SECR plain green livery,  No. 1256 Southern Railway Black livery and No. 31227 in BR Black livery with early emblem along with the Class 170 2 Car DMU No. in 170308 in South West Trains livery are at the artwork approval stage.

I hope you find this round up interesting and as stated above watch this space for a forthcoming review of the ex LBSC H2 Class 4-4-2 Atlantic.

This months picture…

An ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0T No. 100 takes on water at the small sub shed at Canute Road Quay. The B4 is a McGowen white metal kit.

The Southern Railway purchased 14 (plus one extra for spares) of these powerful, short wheel based locomotives from the United States Army Transportation Corps in 1946 for use within Southampton Docks to replace the ageing ex LSWR B4 0-4-0t.  They were built to US Army specification T1531, all bar one of the 14 were built by Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania; whist one, that became SR No.61 was built by H K Porter & Co Pittsburgh.

USA Tank No. 4326 in United States Army Transportation Corps livery and condition,  note: lack of side cab windows, porthole rear cab windows and coal bunker with coal rails. I use this Model Rail version as the basis of my No.71 below.

They were modified at at Eastleigh works to suit Southern Railway use including: adding steam heating, vacuum ejectors, sliding cab side windows, square instead of circular front and rear cab windows (which ironically gave them more of an American look than British but improved visibility from the cab), Ross ‘pop’ type safety valves, a whistle, additional lamp irons and new cylinder drain cocks.

Early condition No. 72 still with original cab front and rear windows and bunker but cab side windows fitted and weathered

Once the locomotives started to enter traffic, large roof-top ventilators were fitted, British regulators to replace the US-style pull-out one, extended coal bunkers increasing capacity from 26cwt to 30cwt, separate steam and vacuum brake controls and wooden tip-up seats.

No. 68 shows off the extended rear bunker, roiff ventilator and square rear cab windows

It should be noted that engines entered service before all these modifications were totally completed and some locomotives did not receive all the modifications into early British Railways days, the last being October 1948..

Later in British Railways days they were fitted additional hand rails and an additional flat fold down platform beneath the front of the smokebox that folded down over the buffers to assist staff cleaning out the smokbox.

A view of No. 68 suitably weathered on Canute Road Quay

Post 1957 thet were also fitted with wireless two way cab radios, a whip aerial on the drivers side cab sheet and a steam driven turbine generator to power them. These steam generators were in fact second hand having been previously fitted to the various T9 and L11 class locomotives that were fitted with them when fitted for oil-firing in 1947/8.

No. 30064 in later BR livery and condition showing revised handrails and fold down front platform

Six of the class were later transferred to departmental stock and could be found at locations such Guildford shed and Meldon Quarry. They were eventually replaced at Southampton by the Class 07 diesel shunters. Withdrawal of the class took place between 1964 and 1967. Foiur survive into preservation, along with one similar ex USATC locomotive from Yugoslavia that was never in SR /BR(s) service.

Another view of No. 68 on Canute Road Quay

Those pictured on this post are based on the excellent ready to run model commissioned by Model Rail Magazine by Bachmann. Dapol have produced the ex LSWR B4 0-4-0t that the USA tanks replaced and Heljan have now also produced the 07 Class diesels that displaced the USA from Southampton docks. All of which are very suitable for my Canute Road Quay layout. See my exhibition diary page here to see where Canute Road Quay can be seen next.

You can not help but admire the Bulleid Merchant Navy paciifics in either original air smoothed or their later rebuilt form. Its it great that a number have been preserved and are at various stages of restoration / preservation. Regular readers of this blog will know, via the two dedicated pages that I am shareholder in both 35006 Peninsular & Oriental S. N. Co. and 35011 General Steam Navigation. I am also a member of the Merchant Navy Locomotive Preservation Society that maintains and operates 35028 Clan Line in such wonderful  running condition on the main line. This  my way of playing a small part in the preservation of these splendid machines.

We are also fortunate that 35018 British India Line privately owned by Dave Smith of West Coast Railways is now, like 35028 regularly performing on the Main Line. 35005 Canadian Pacific is currently undergoing a major overhaul at Eastleigh works before returning to service on the Mid Hants, Watercress, Railway. You can add your support to 35005 here.

The purpose of this post is to assist with the awareness and publicity of these wonderful locomotives, especially No.6 and No.11, you can tell I like them can’t you…

35006

35006 has the signal off at Cheltenham Racecourse (ready to run around rather than head further south)

35006 in the sunshine at Toddington on 14/07/18

As can be read on my dedicated page, updated today, for 35006 Peninsular & Oriental S. N. Co the evening of the 14th July 2018 was the annual members day event with a dedicated special train purely for members and shareholders of the 35006 Society.

Inside the cab of No.6

No.6 had been in service on the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Steam Railway during the day and between here last service run and the private train she was coaled and positioned for viewing at Toddington, where even her nameplate received an additional polish.

The setting sun visible through the window and the fireman keeps No.6 simmering

She certainly looked as seen above splendid in the bright and hot summer sunshine.

Once coupled to the members train she ran non stop to Cheltenham racecourse station where she took on water.

Sun, Shadows & shapes at Broadway

Having run round she took the train tender first, again non stop, back past Toddington and on to the new extension, only opened at Easter this year, to the wonderfully recreated, Broadway station which looked fantastic in the evening setting sunshine.  The 14 miles end to end gives a nice 28 mile round trip, and a couple of nice gradients thown into the mix,  with some great views across the Cotswolds.

The driver awaits the off from Broadway

The run from Broadway back to Toddington was certainly a spirited one, having spoken to the driver on arrival at Toddington about the likely speed, he replied with a grin on his face that the gauge didn’t go over 21 at any point (is it a co-incidence that the vacuum brake gauge would have been showing 21inches..?)

It was certainly a great day and evenings run, with No.6 looking great and running superbly and a credit to the 35006 Society and the running staff of the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Steam Railway

It was also great to be able to get up close to 35006 and hopefully some of the pictures illustrating this post shows the impressiveness of her and also the impressive level of restoration and maintenance that has gone into this complex piece of engineering Bulleid Brilliance (with a little bit of Jarvis thrown in, I will concede).

No.6 sits at Cheltenham Racecourse 14th July 2018 members day special

35006 is currently restored for steaming this month on 18th, 19th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th and 25th. But  for the very latest information on loco rostering check the GWSR website here

See my page here on how you can help keep, in any small way, No.6 up and running. 

Bulleid bits in abstract (with some Jarvis parts)

35011

The General Steam Navigation Locomotive Restoration Society was formed at the end of 2015 with the aim of taking over 35011 from her then owners and commence full restoration once a new location for this to take place can be found. The first major milestone of the new 35011 Locomotive Society of talking over ownership of 35011 took place in August 2016.

Some of the deicated team pose in front of No.11 with one of the lovely new nameplates (picture courtesy and copyright 35011 Society)

A number of working parties have already taken place at the current site, although a new site is required before more major work can be carried out. the boiler receiving a further coat of protective paint and work on the trailing truck (being the only surviving fabricated style trailing struck). Also a variety of components have been sourced and machined, including impressive new nameplates and also injector valve handles (to which I contributed to the fund to sponsor these items.

A set of injector valve handles that I am proud to have sponsored.

The Society have also acquired a brass lamp fitted with the bullseye lens, toggle switch to side and bulb holder inside (as per the one shown on 35006 pictured above). The lamp is reported to have come off Merchant Navy’ Class No. 35024 “East Asiatic Company”. Gaining the lamp is fantastic news for the project as the use of original components helps add character to the locomotive.

See my page here on how you can  help with the restoration project of returning No.11 back to original Air Smoothed condition, every little helps.

Only announced as being part of the Hornby 2018 range in January this year the  Maunsell 1st Class Kitchen Dining cars have now arrived and yes they are pretty much 1st Class and certainly up the standard that we have come to expect from Hornby for coaching stock. Often coupled to the Maunsell diagram 2005 Open 3rd coaches these will complete Southern / Southern Region express passenger rakes.

R4816 – SR Maunsell Kitchen Dining First Number 7869 Diagram 2656, in SR Green.

The versions being produced initially by Hornby are: R4816, SR Maunsell Kitchen Dining First Number 7869 Diagram 2656, in unlined SR Green; and R4817, BR Maunsell Kitchen Dining First Number S7861S Diagram 2651, in BR(s) Green.

Kitchen Diner First Digram 2556 No 7869 c1940 image copyright and courtesy M King

The Diagram 2656 cars were  built in 1932 and a later batch built in 1934 and other than the cooking equipment fitted were similar in body style to Diagram 2650. There has been much debate that Hornby have chosen to produce this model in unlined olive-green which is totally correct for post 1940s, as seen in the picture, left,  courtesy of friend and SR coach guru Mike King. Evidence also exists of members of the 1934 built batch having been introduced when new in unlined livery (See Gould, Oakwood Press; Maunsell’s SR Steam Passenger stock 1923 to 1939)

A 3/4 view of R4816 No. 7869

The Diagram 2651 in BR(s) green represents one of the six, originally built in 1927, coaches post rebuilding around 1935 to include the characteristic recessed double doors.

The other end of R4816 No. 7868 the representation of the lead weights on the solebar can be seen in in this picture

There were some slight bodyside differences between these and the subsequent 20 similar cars built in 1929 and 1930 which is one of the reason why after some discussion between the Hornby team and a number of contributors that the originally announced number of S7946S was changed, to suit photographic evidence, especially related to the size of the window next to the double doors.

A view of R4817 No. S7861S to Diagram 2651 in BR(s) green

The pictures of the models accompanying this post speak for themselves, and as stated above meet the standards we have come to expect to from Hornby for coaching stock especially with respect to the other Maunsell coaches they have produced.  The bodyside feature the relevant panel lines, hand rails on the ends and are nicely flush glazed, frosted where appropriate. Clip on corridor connection end doors are fitted but these can be removed, to reveal the closed inner doors, if required.

Another view of R4718 No. S7861S note the smaller window by the double doors

The interior is well moulded and the tables painted to represent white table clothes and includes the swan neck table lamp, although unlike the Pullman range these do not illuminate.
Curtains are printed on the inside of the glazing, which again has been an area of debate especially as they are uniform on each window, some may wish to remove these, and if doing so use only good quality methylated spirit on a cotton bud, do not use anything like enamel thinners or similar as this is likely to fog the glazing.

A view of the underframe

The Underframe is well detailed with sprung buffers and the nicely moulded delicate end bottom foot steps on each corner and also all the additional tanks and equipment associated with dining cars and the excellent Hornby standard SR 8ft Bogies are used. The lead weights that were located on the solebar, which were necessary to even up the wight distribution of the prototypes is also moulded.

A higher angle view of R4816 No. 7869 to show off the roof and its various vents and water tanks

The roof mouldings include the relevant water tanks and variety of vents needed especially over the kitchen area.

An accessory pack is included with each coach containing blank roof boards and Roco style close couplings, I will be using Kaydee No. 19 buckeye couplings as per the rest of my Hornby Maunsell coaching stock.

In  reality and to most eyes the Diagram 2656 and rebuilt Diagram 2651 cars are pretty similar and in many ways it is a shame that perhaps the tooling for the original Diagram 2651 cars has not been done, although perhaps this is still a future option? One very pedantic further point is that on the boxes Hornby have called these ‘Kitchen/Dinning coaches’ not sure where the additional ‘n’ comes from…

Overall these are a good and long-awaited additional to the range for Southern Modellers, one should hope that a SR lined green version will be announced in due course as although Hornby have publicaly stated that their tooling does not allow this, I like a number of others do not believe this to be the case.

Note: I have of course referenced Mike King’s excellent book in writing this post: An illustrated history of Southern Coaches, OPC  ISBN 0-86093-570-1 and David Gould: Maunsell’s SR Steam Passenger stock 1923 to 1939, Oakwood Press, that should grace any SR / BR(s) modellers book shelf.

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