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This months picture…

A busy time at Fisherton Sarum, G6 Class No. 237 shunts the ash wagon, whilst N15 Clss locomotives 746 'Pendragon' and 782 'Sir Brian' await their next turn of duty. Bulleid West Country class No. 21c121 'Dartmoor', a much modified Hornby Margate manufactured model heads west.

A busy time at Fisherton Sarum, G6 Class No. 237 built from a SE Finecast kit, shunts the ash wagon, whilst N15 Class locomotives 746 ‘Pendragon’ and 782 ‘Sir Brian’ await their next turn of duty. Bulleid West Country class No. 21c121 ‘Dartmoor’, a much modified Hornby Margate manufactured model heads west.

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Further to my post Talking Stock #4 Cabs and Deflectors, Bulleid Light Pacific variations about the many Bulleid Light Pacific class variations this post provides expanded information on the modifications I make to represent the original style cab as Hornby have yet to do a Bulleid Light Pacific body variation in this style.

Here is 21C102 "Salisbury" fitted with both the original style cab and also modified to include the short smoke deflectors that were as originally fitted to the first engines of the class when built.

To recap, when first introduced 21C101 to 21C163 had the original Bulleid style cab with narrow front lookout and two large side windows, the rear one of which slid forwards behind the front. Starting in July 1947 the cabs were modified, with a wedge shaped front (sometimes referred to a ‘V’ shaped) giving a larger front window area, it took until December 1955 to complete the modification to all.

Compare the cab with that fitted to 21C151 "Winston Churchill" which has the later modified wedge shaped cab and the standard length smoke deflectors.

As I model the period from 1946 to 1949 many of the Light Pacifics in service during that time would still have had the original style cab.

I have modified a number of the Hornby models so far by either fitting a  brass cab made from scratch or using the white metal castings from the Southern Railway Group replacing the existing Hornby version.

The original Hornby cab removed

Both methods require the original cab to be removed. Using a fine razor saw, I cut the base of cab off flush with the cab floor, the joint of the new cab here will be hidden once painted as it will coincide with the edge of the lining. Then, again with a fine razor saw, I cut vertically slightly to the rear of the existing cab front, finishing with a file, and then cut across the roof about 2mm back from the row of rivets in line with the cab side front.

The Scratchbuilt cab in place. The front of the cab is simply made from Milliput filler.

Firstly scratch brass cab, I make new cab sides and roof as one piece from 18-thou brass.   The new sides need to be curved to the correct profile and then a tighter curve blending into the cab roof. I use the profile of the tender side / rear spectacle plate as a match for the cab sides and followed the curve of the original Hornby cab for the side to roof transition curve and roof profile itself.  Windows frames are from Jackson Evans. Once the new cab is glued into place, I fitted a white metal cab roof shutter (Westward) and representations of the cab lifting bales bent into the correct shape from 5-thou 1/32″ brass strip. The ends of the rear cab overhang are bent downwards slightly as per the prototype.

The SRG white sides fixed in place.

The second method and the one I tend to use the most now are the cast white metal sides from the Southern Railway Group. These are supposed to replace the whole depth of the side of the cab but cutting the whole side off makes it a little tricky to keep the cab square on reassembly due to the weakening effect it has on the original Hornby body, I therefore keep the bottom edge of the cab side and cut the castings to suit.

s21C148 'Crediton' as modified using the SRG castings

The original Hornby rear spectacle plates (and handrails) are reused and glued into place and any slight gap between them and the new cab side filled with Milliput. As these are painted clear plastic the actual window area will need to be masked prior to repainting the model.
Using these methods I have been able to add a number of Bulleid Light Pacifics to my fleet in their original condition to enable a number of the prototypes variations to be seen on Fisherton Sarum.

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When first introduced 21C101 to 21C163 had the original Bulleid style cab with narrow front lookout and two large side windows, the rear one of which slid forwards behind the front. Complaints were made due to a restricted forward view, not helped by the position, inside the cab, of the vacuum ejector controls, in front of the window on the driver’s side. Therefore starting in July 1947 the cabs were modified, with a wedge shaped front (sometimes referred to a ‘V’ shaped) giving a larger front window area. This resulted in a slightly smaller side window area which was then fitted with three windows the rear two of which slide behind the front to give in effect the same open window area as the original style cab.

21C102 'Salisbury' with original style cab and short smoke deflectors (brass scratch built cab)

The Hornby Light Pacific models all have the modified cab arrangement which restricts the of prototypes that can be modelled in either Southern or early British Railways Liveries.

21C103 'Plymouth' like 21C102 above with original style cab and short smoke deflectors (SRG whitemetal cab sides)

To suit my own modelling period on Fisherton Sarum of 1946 to 1949 I  have therefore modified a number of my Hornby Bulleid Light Pacifics to  the original style cabs.

s21C148 'Crediton' in early British Railways livery has original style cab and the standard length smoke deflectors (SRG whitemetal cab sides)

This involves cutting of the Hornby cab moulding, quite a daunting task on a £70 / £80 or more model, and replacing with either a scratch built brass cab or utilising replacement cast whitemetal cab sides that are now available from the Southern Railway Group (The production of these was prompted by my original conversion being detailed on the semg site).  After fitting the new cabs I tend to repaint the entire locomotive using either Railmatch or Precision Paints aerosol malachite green and number and lining transfers from the Historical Model Railway Society.

For comparison 34004 'Yeovil' post Locomotive Exchange Trials has a modified wedge or 'V' Cab and extended smoke deflectors.

As well the change in cab styles there also a number of different length smoke deflectors fitted starting with the original short length that then were increased in length to the standard length, whilst the three class members assigned to the Locomotive Exchange Trials in 1948 were all given extended deflectors, which they kept until either withdrawal or rebuilding, Note these three locomotives also received the wedge shaped cab prior tot the trials too).

Further information and a step by step process can be found on the Southern ‘e’ Group (SeMG) site here or my RMweb blog here

Further comparison 34090 'Sir Eustice Missenden' with standard length smoke deflectors and 9' wide wedge shaped cab from new.

Whilst on the subject of cabs it should also be noted that the last 40 built from 34071 to 34110 also had wider 9′ 0″ cabs (wedge shaped from new) instead of the earlier 8’6″ width.

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