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Posts Tagged ‘Southern’

Marking the occasion will be somewhat different this year due to obvious circumstances. If you so wish, wear a poppy with pride today, but please pause respectfully for two minutes at 11 am this Remembrance Sunday and for Armistice Day on Wednesday remembering all those, both service and civilian personnel whom have given their lives for the freedom that we all enjoy today, and should you feel so inclined, especially in these times, support the sterling work of the Royal British Legion.

Marking 102 years since the end of the ‘Great War’, unfortunately not the war to end all wars, and although this post is mainly written to commemorate this especially poignant anniversary it is also dedicated to all Railway companies across the country and indeed the world that lost many staff; not only those drafted into the military services, but also those lost whom continued their duties on the railways keeping the networks up and running, we should honour and remember them all.

When You Go Home,
Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow,
We Gave Our Today

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

Locomotive 333 was built originally by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway, designed by Billinton, as an L class 4-6-4 ‘Baltic’ tank. She was given the name Remembrance and became the companies War Memorial engine and carried a plaque with the inscription:

“In grateful remembrance of the 532 men of the L.B.& S.C.Rly. who gave their lives for their country, 1914-1919″

In 1934, under the auspices of Maunsell they were rebuilt as Class N15x (an appropriate Brighton-style suffix) 4-6-0s, and fitted with standard Urie LSWR tenders along with smoke deflectors. Now number 2333 ‘Remembrance’ retained its name, plaque and status within the Southern Railway.

This year also marks 100 years since the body of the British Unknown Warrior arrived at London Victoria station after being transported by ship and train from the fields of France, on 10th November 1020, and lay overnight at Platform 8 before internment at Westminster Abbey the following day on  Armistice Day.

 

Inscribed on James Scott’s Victory Arch, at Waterloo station: “Dedicated to the employees of the Company who fell in the war.” and the names of those London and South Western employees who gave their life are honoured within the arch.

And just to end this post, as written by Paul Hunter – the poppy is more than a one time of a year symbol:, 

I am not a badge of honour, I am not a racist smear,
I am not a fashion statement, to be worn but once a year,
I am not glorification of conflict or of war.
I am not a paper ornament a token,
I am more.

I am a loving memory, Of a father or a son,
a permanent reminder of each and every one. 
I’m paper or enamel, I’m old or shining new,
I’m a way of saying thank you, To every one of you.

I am a simple poppy, a reminder to you all,
That courage faith and honour,
will stand where heroes of all kinds fall.

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Bachmann Europe have continued their new policy of making quarterly product announcements and as per last August whilst Covid-19 has stopped the physical showcase event taking place Collectors Club members were able to get a virtual preview of today’s announcement earlier this morning.

Bachmann 

31-911 H1 Class No. 2038

31-921 H2 Class 32425

Although no new tooling is announced main new additions to the range to be delivered in the next three months include the ex LBSC  H1 and H2 Atlantic 4-4-2 in three new liveries and available as sound fitted:

  • 31- 911 H1 Class Atlantic No. 2038 ‘Portland Bill’ in SR Malachite Green
  • 31-922 H2 Class Atlantic No. 433 in LBSC Umber
  • 31-921 H” Class Atlantic No. 32425 ‘Tevose Head’ in BR Lined black – early emblem

A new version, 31-400B, of the SR 25T ‘Pill box’ in post 1936 SR Brown livery. Also included are new versions of the class 108 and 117 DMUs

Included within the November expected deliveries are finally the three versions of the Class 414 2-HAP 2-car EMUs 6061 BR (SR) Green, 6063 BR Blue & Grey and 4308 BR Network SouthEast that were first announced back in 2016. and the previously announced 38-401B SR/BR 25T ‘Pill Box’ brake van in BR Grey with left hand duckets.

The EFE Rail range continues to grow

The Beattie Well Tanks are in the ERF Rail range in versions (picture copyright and courtesy Kernow Model Rail Centre)

Gate stock Set 373 in lined SR Olive Green (picture copyright and courtesy Kernow Model Rail Centre)

We see the introduction into the growing EFE Rail range of models supplied via other partners such as the The Kernow Model Rail Centre including the 0298 class Beattie Well tanks, including for the first time the attractive lined green livery that 3298 carried in preservation. The ex LSWR Gate Stock also makes an appearance having undergone some tooling amendments to the chassis details, interior and roof vents.

  • E85010 BR 0298 Class 2-4-0T No. 30586 with Square splashers in BR Black late emblem as from February 1960
  • E85011 SR 0298 Class 2-4-0T No. 3298 in Southern lined black livery as carried between May 1933 and October 1939
  • E85012 SR 0298 Class 2-4-0T No. 3298 in Southern lined green livery as preserved at Buckfastleigh between April 1978 and December 2001
  • E86001 BR Gate Stock Set 374 in BR unlined crimson livery as carried from c 1950
  • E86002 SR Gate Stock Set 373 in SR Lined Olive livery as carried 1933 to c1950

The 00 range also sees 4 livery versions of the Class 58s and 4 livery versions of the bogie Cargowaggon whilst the N gauge range also sees the introduction of the BR Shark Ballast plough brake vans and the JIA  Nacco Wagons.

Graham Farish

Likewise the Graham Farish range sees no new tooling announced but sound fitted options for the stanier 8Fs and Class 31s and Mk1 GUVs are about to hit the shelves.

The full range and announcements can be seen on the Bachmann Europe website here.

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This months picture…

Drummond M7 0-4-4t passes my Grandfather in model form leaning on his ballast fork during a break, when he was a ganger for the Southern Railway based at Salisbury. The M7 is South Eastern Finecast white metal kit.

 

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The Kernow Model Rail Centre has today announced the release of exclusive commission from Bachmann Scenecraft in 00 of the ex London South Western Railway (LSWR) Type 3a, Grade two listed, signal box at Petersfield.

Petersfield Signal Box

A rear view of the Petersfield box

Setting the scene for the Petersfield signal box

The Petersfield type 3a signal box was built c1885 and is located on the Portsmouth Direct Line between Havent and Guildford (where of course the 2nd Kernow Model Rail Centre store opened in 2019).
Petersfield station was opened by the Portsmouth Railway in 1859, it was leased by the London & South Western Railway, who bought it outright in 1861. The station was extended and enlarged in 1864 to accommodate the traffic from the new Petersfield Railway to Midhurst.

The box is unique as it combines features of both ex LSWR type 2 and type 3 designs. It protects the Station Road level-crossing and it formerly controlled the junction of the Midhurst branch that was closed 1955. Although the closure of the goods yards occurred during the 1970s, the volume of passenger traffic and the need to guard the busy level-crossing has ensured that the signal box has remained in operation. It still contains a ten-lever Stevens (Railway Signalling Co.) frame and locking rack (c1880), together with a circuit diagram, blockshelf and block instruments.

Chris Trerise, Managing Director said: “The Petersfield signal box was a logical choice for us to commission due to its unique style and its location on the Portsmouth Direct Line local to our Guildford store” Chris continued: “We are pleased that our Guildford store has been able to remain fully open to our customers since the Covid-19 lockdown.

The exclusive to Kernow Model Rail Centre 44-074X Bachmann Scenecraft LSWR Signal Box – Petersfield costs £79.99  

This latest addition to compliments the LSWR Type 4 signal box “Bude” and also the LSWR Ground frame hut already exclusively available from the Kernow Model Rail Centre.

 

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The first five members of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSC) E2 class 0-6-0 tanks were introduced by L Billington in June 1913.  In service they were found to be powerful but slightly lacking in water and therefore a further batch of 5 were ordered, although delayed by the war, and built between June 1915 and October 1916 with extended side tanks, These extended tanks  increased water capacity from 1,090 to 1,256 gallons.
They were used on shunting and short distance goods trips, their small capacity coal bunkers made them unsuitable for longer trips. They were also used on empty stock workings at Victoria and London Bridge.

E2 No. 2104 shunts at the Quay

Work in progress front 3/4 view

Work in Progress rear 3/4 view

The bulk of the E2 can be seen in comparison with the B4 class. The body is yet to be lowered on the chassis slightly.

The later style chassis with added guard irons and sandboxes. The front fixing lugs are yet to be filed smaller to lower the body (The rear lug is likewise reduced)

The front 3/4 view RH side

the RH Side 3/4 view, she awaits some weathering now

Further shunting at the Quay

Following the onset of electrification a number were used as shunters at Southampton Docks and despite their 16ft wheelbase restricting their use in some areas of the docks they stayed working the docks until 1962 when the Class 07 diesels arrived.
Withdrawal of took place between 1961 and 1963.

The Hornby model of the E2 0-6-0 first appeared in 1979 and following 4 versions, LBSC Umber (2 versions) , SR lined Black and SR olive green, production ceased in 1984.   After which the tooling was altered used for the production of some other blue model… dam I wasn’t going to mention that…

Many years ago in my yoof I simply repainted into SR ‘Sunshine’ black, now with Canute Road Quay being an ideal setting for an E2 I decided to dig the E2 out again and give her a quick win makeover, so finescale modellers look away now…

The original chassis was the standard at the time Hornby generic 0-6-0 X04 motor fitted chassis. As this is a quick win project I have decided to not at this stage built a new chassis but simply swap it for the later style of Hornby 0-6-0 generic chassis with its closed frames and smaller motor and slightly greater level of detail. This later chassis is a direct replacement and also gives better running.
To this chassis I have added front sandboxes, made from plastic rectangular section and filed to shape with wire sand pipes, and added front and rear guard irons from plasticard.

The body itself generally matches the correct dimensions for the E2 which was certainly one of the larger 0-6-0 tanks. I have added new brass buffers, pipework, clack valves and lamp irons from various bits and bobs kicking around from the spares / scrap box.
In keeping with the Brighton Style, dating from when the water in the tanks was pre heated, the tank sides were clad and the fixing bolts for the cladding were a visible feature and the E2 was no different. To represent these visible fixings I drilled then glued in 0.45mm wire before cutting the wire almost flush with the tankside.
Just underneath the running plate I have added the long horizontal air tanks on each side, made from plastic rod and some of the piping from brass wire.

The E2 is a large tank when compared to other tanks such as the B4 class, however the body as new does sit slightly too high on the chassis, and this is simply remedied by filing the underside of the front two fixing lugs and also the underside of the single rear sprung lug.

After a dusting with primer from a Halfords aerosol can she received a coat of Halfords Satin Black again from a rattle can before the smokebox and cab roof were brush painted matt black and the bufferbeam of course in red. Her identity as 2104 was added using HMRS Pressfix transfers to complete the look.

I admit she would benefit from a proper finescale chassis, but as a quick win project I think it fits the bill and will extend the life of the Hornby model seeing occasional use on canute Road Quay. A nice 3D print of the E2 with the extended tanks is available and so this might form the basis of a future project…

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On Friday 2nd October 2020, the boiler of Ex-SR Bulleid Merchant Navy Class, 35011 “General Steam Navigation” was successfully lifted from its frames for the first time since 1959. The boiler was built by North British in Glasgow in January 1941 and has been attached for a total of 61 years since its last overhaul in July 1959.

The boiler of 35011 is lifted from the frames for the first time since 1959

The frames are lifted to allow the trailing truck to be removed

The old smokebox is removed

The aim of the General Steam Navigation locomotive Restoration Society is to restore the Merchant Navy locomotive 21c11 / 35011 to her original as built condition complete with air smooth casing and Bulleids unique chain driven valve gear.

The trailing truck was also removed from the frames, utilising the crane on site as this will soon be moving off site to be fully restored.

The smokebox, that would have been unusable if we were restoring to as rebuilt condition, was also removed. A new smokebox to the original design will be fabricated in due course.

As a trustee and Director of the project it is an exciting time for the project and it allows us to concentrate on the restoration of the chassis which on its own is a big project and will take several years to complete.

We are in the early stages in the process of the manufacture of a new centre crank axle (she had the crank axle swapped for a plain axle just after withdrawal) and also the middle cylinder will need to be replaced to return her back to Bulleid’s original condition.  

With work on 35011 now being directed to the restoration of the chassis and further fund-raising campaigns will be launched in due course. The first of which is the wheelset tyre profiling fund here

We have been made very welcome by our friends at the Swindon and Cricklade Railway  and I am very pleased to be able to advise that following the forced closure of the line due to COVID-19 it is re-opening to passenger services this Sunday 4th October. 

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This months picture…

Adams B4 0-4-0t No.100 rest at Canute Road Quay, she is built from a white metal kit

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This months picture…

USA Tank No.68 shunts in the sunshine at Canute Road Quay.

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The Kernow Model Rail Centre have received the first Engineering Prototype (EP) from the tooling for the much-anticipated ex LSWR / SR Diagram 1541 10T Road Van. First introduced by the London & South Western Railway (LSWR) in 1884 they were later classed as Southern Railway Diagram 1541.  Almost 500 of these were built between then and 1905 making them the most numerous LSWR Goods Brake Van.  Brake Vans with side doors through which parcels or other goods could be loaded were known as road vans.

The CADs, based on a laser scan of the preserved example at the Isle of Wight steam railway, were approved for tooling earlier this year.
KMRC advised: “The first Engineering Prototype samples have been carefully evaluated and we are very pleased with how the EP has turned out. We are currently discussing directly with the factory a very small number of slight modifications before the next stage of livery samples can be produced. The production of the livery artwork is in progress.”

The pictures show the high level of detail and multitude of separately fitted parts including: flush glazing, hand rails, brake gear with pull rodding, step boards and lamp irons to accurately portray a number of different versions of the prototype.

These options include alternative buffer shanks with a ribbed option as fitted to preserved No. 56046 on the Isle of Wight steam railway and either straight or cranked step board supports, the latter as fitted to the majority of those transferred in 1925 to the Isle of Wight.

In light of further research, a small number of the available versions have been changed with corrected running numbers and liveries as BR Bauxite would not be appropriate for the available options of this road van.

Details of the ten versions can be found on the Kernow Model Rail Centre website here

Anyone wishing to amend their pre-order due to these changes can contact the Kernow Model Rail Centre either through the website or via telephone.

Note: the images show a version with a mix of the potential options and does not necessarily show an actual available version.

I hope that you will agree it is looking great.

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As I advised in my recent Covid, exhibitions, mental health and life changes post, in an attempt to restore my modelling mojo whilst on furlough I started to build a number of the wagon kits that I had added to the to do later pile over the last few years.

The Diagram 1410 Covered Goods Wagons awaiting painting

The crispness of the Cambrian Models mouldings can be clearly seen in with this Diagram 1316 open

The finished painted and lettered wagons in pre and post 1936 liveries.

The Diagram 1426 shows of its height against a low roofed Diagram 1410

The kits were all from the excellent Cambrian Models range and comprised of:

  • 4 off ex LSWR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1410
  • 2 off ex SECR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1426
  • 1 off ex LSWR 8 plank 12t Open Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1316

These kits are of an excellent standard, with crisp mouldings and assemble quite easily once you have got your head around some of the various options, mainly around the type and number of brakes fitted. As usual I refer to the bibles for Southern wagon builders the “Illustrated History of Southern Wagons” the four volumes are now sadly out of print but are worth tracking down if you don’t already have access to copies.

Although I follow the well written and detailed instructions; I tend to replace the plastic buffer heads with metal replacements from the Alan Gibson range or similar to give additional durability. I also add some cut lead sheet to the underside of the chassis to bring the weight up to approximately 30 grams (around one ounce for older readers) as this improves running. I always fit brass top hat pin point bearings into the axle boxes and use Alan Gibson wheels.
I tend to purchase these kits, wheels etc. either at shows, when we could, or online from H&A Models whom always provide a friendly and efficient service and in these times it’s always good to help and continue to support such excellent traders.

The Hornby Diagram 1543 ‘New’ van showing the incorrect brown and oversize Tare lettering height

The paint dries in the oven

B4 No. 82 runs around the two repainted Hornby Diagram 1543 brake vans.

A very busy scene at Canute Road Quay as all the wagon builds have come to visit

In addition to the above wagons, whilst on a roll, I have finally got round to repainting the two Hornby ex LSWR 20t Warner ‘New’ diagram 1543 brake vans that arrived at the start of year. Whist excellent models the SR versions in this first batch were not finished in the correct shade of SR Brown, also the Tare lettering was incorrectly the same size as the wagon number when it should be smaller. A nice touch by Hornby  is that they provide a separate beautifully printed plate for the “Not to work between Tonbridge and West St. Leonards via Battle” in addition to it being pre printed on the wagon side, so I have affixed these to the repaints.

For all my wagons I tend to follow the same painting process:

  • Firstly for the kit builds I give a dusting of Halford plastic primer from an aerosol ‘rattle’ can
  • I then brush paint the base colour, I prefer to paint two thin coats rather than one heavy coat.
  • I always help dry the paintwork in a warmed oven (set to less than 50 deg and the door kept open, luckily, I don’t need to ask anyone permission first!).
  • In most cases I use lettering from the HMRS Pressfix transfer range and I use a mix of pre (large SR) and post 1936 (small SR) styles to give some variety.
  • Finally, I apply Railmatch Satin Varnish from a rattle can to fix the lettering and even the finish.

Well I said finally, but actually the wagons now await degrees of weathering that I tend to do as a batch and still have to do so for those shown here.

 

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