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Posts Tagged ‘Southern Region’

This is the fifth in the series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  In this post we are firmly in the Southampton Docks but after 1962 when the Class 07 diesels were specifically introduced to modernise the operations in the docks.

A pair of Heljan Class 07 models meet at Canute Road Quay

Class 07 D2985 arrives at the quay

D2988 is from the second Heljan production batch

Passing Class 07s at Canute Road quay

A busy moment in time at Canute Road Quay

D2985 arrives on the quay and passes D2988 awaiting to depart

D2985 arrives at the quay

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the

Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) items such as the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. are loose, so it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

The USA 0-6-0 tanks had been in service within Southampton Docks since 1946, Due to the various tight curves within Southampton Docks utilising existing Diesel shunters such as the EE 350HP, later 09 class was not going to be an option. Therefore in 1962 Fourteen 0-6-0 diesel-electric shunting 275HP locomotives specifically for use in Southampton Docks were purchased by British Railways from Ruston Paxman.  They had a wheelbase of only 8 ft 7½ in, compared with 11 ft 6 in for an 08. With their high well glazed cab offset between long and short bonnets they certainly had their own distinctive character.

The Heljan models, as per my review here, have captured the look of the prototype well. The feature a multi part injection  moulded body with fine etched front and rear nose grills on a heavy diecast chassis. Separately fitted items include: metal handrails, sprung buffers, windscreen wipers, pipework, roof mounted air horns and factory fitted screw link couplings. Underneath the body the chassis features the correct air cylinders, sand boxes, sand pipes, other pipework and brake gear. Also fitted is a working lubricator linkage on the left hand side (when viewed long bonnet forward. Included with the model are discs, including those with duty numbers, as used within Southampton Docks.

When paired with the suitable later era rolling stock, that I have now collected and weathered, the Heljan Class 07s certainly look the part and with their smooth running make shunting at Canute Road Quay easy and a refreshing change from my usual period.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay may or may not be set in its usual location, so once again, where and what era will it be…?

 

 

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The Kernow Model Rail Centre have received the first Engineering Prototype (EP) from the tooling for the much-anticipated ex LSWR / SR Diagram 1541 10T Road Van. First introduced by the London & South Western Railway (LSWR) in 1884 they were later classed as Southern Railway Diagram 1541.  Almost 500 of these were built between then and 1905 making them the most numerous LSWR Goods Brake Van.  Brake Vans with side doors through which parcels or other goods could be loaded were known as road vans.

The CADs, based on a laser scan of the preserved example at the Isle of Wight steam railway, were approved for tooling earlier this year.
KMRC advised: “The first Engineering Prototype samples have been carefully evaluated and we are very pleased with how the EP has turned out. We are currently discussing directly with the factory a very small number of slight modifications before the next stage of livery samples can be produced. The production of the livery artwork is in progress.”

The pictures show the high level of detail and multitude of separately fitted parts including: flush glazing, hand rails, brake gear with pull rodding, step boards and lamp irons to accurately portray a number of different versions of the prototype.

These options include alternative buffer shanks with a ribbed option as fitted to preserved No. 56046 on the Isle of Wight steam railway and either straight or cranked step board supports, the latter as fitted to the majority of those transferred in 1925 to the Isle of Wight.

In light of further research, a small number of the available versions have been changed with corrected running numbers and liveries as BR Bauxite would not be appropriate for the available options of this road van.

Details of the ten versions can be found on the Kernow Model Rail Centre website here

Anyone wishing to amend their pre-order due to these changes can contact the Kernow Model Rail Centre either through the website or via telephone.

Note: the images show a version with a mix of the potential options and does not necessarily show an actual available version.

I hope that you will agree it is looking great.

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As I advised in my recent Covid, exhibitions, mental health and life changes post, in an attempt to restore my modelling mojo whilst on furlough I started to build a number of the wagon kits that I had added to the to do later pile over the last few years.

The Diagram 1410 Covered Goods Wagons awaiting painting

The crispness of the Cambrian Models mouldings can be clearly seen in with this Diagram 1316 open

The finished painted and lettered wagons in pre and post 1936 liveries.

The Diagram 1426 shows of its height against a low roofed Diagram 1410

The kits were all from the excellent Cambrian Models range and comprised of:

  • 4 off ex LSWR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1410
  • 2 off ex SECR 10t Covered Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1426
  • 1 off ex LSWR 8 plank 12t Open Goods Wagon to SR Diagram 1316

These kits are of an excellent standard, with crisp mouldings and assemble quite easily once you have got your head around some of the various options, mainly around the type and number of brakes fitted. As usual I refer to the bibles for Southern wagon builders the “Illustrated History of Southern Wagons” the four volumes are now sadly out of print but are worth tracking down if you don’t already have access to copies.

Although I follow the well written and detailed instructions; I tend to replace the plastic buffer heads with metal replacements from the Alan Gibson range or similar to give additional durability. I also add some cut lead sheet to the underside of the chassis to bring the weight up to approximately 30 grams (around one ounce for older readers) as this improves running. I always fit brass top hat pin point bearings into the axle boxes and use Alan Gibson wheels.
I tend to purchase these kits, wheels etc. either at shows, when we could, or online from H&A Models whom always provide a friendly and efficient service and in these times it’s always good to help and continue to support such excellent traders.

The Hornby Diagram 1543 ‘New’ van showing the incorrect brown and oversize Tare lettering height

The paint dries in the oven

B4 No. 82 runs around the two repainted Hornby Diagram 1543 brake vans.

A very busy scene at Canute Road Quay as all the wagon builds have come to visit

In addition to the above wagons, whilst on a roll, I have finally got round to repainting the two Hornby ex LSWR 20t Warner ‘New’ diagram 1543 brake vans that arrived at the start of year. Whist excellent models the SR versions in this first batch were not finished in the correct shade of SR Brown, also the Tare lettering was incorrectly the same size as the wagon number when it should be smaller. A nice touch by Hornby  is that they provide a separate beautifully printed plate for the “Not to work between Tonbridge and West St. Leonards via Battle” in addition to it being pre printed on the wagon side, so I have affixed these to the repaints.

For all my wagons I tend to follow the same painting process:

  • Firstly for the kit builds I give a dusting of Halford plastic primer from an aerosol ‘rattle’ can
  • I then brush paint the base colour, I prefer to paint two thin coats rather than one heavy coat.
  • I always help dry the paintwork in a warmed oven (set to less than 50 deg and the door kept open, luckily, I don’t need to ask anyone permission first!).
  • In most cases I use lettering from the HMRS Pressfix transfer range and I use a mix of pre (large SR) and post 1936 (small SR) styles to give some variety.
  • Finally, I apply Railmatch Satin Varnish from a rattle can to fix the lettering and even the finish.

Well I said finally, but actually the wagons now await degrees of weathering that I tend to do as a batch and still have to do so for those shown here.

 

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Published today is the September issue of Hornby Magazine no.159. included with the main magazine is a 32 page supplement “Modelling Guide – Southern Region.”

The initial 6 page article settinging the scene and historical background to the Southern Region has been penned by yours truly!
It was quite a challenge to keep such a wide subject within the word count and give an overview of the Southern, but hopefully I have managed to provide a suitable introduction…

The guide also includes useful articles such as:

  • typical Southern Region train formations that can be modelled using ready to run stock,
  • an explanation of the Southern Region Engine Head Signals and some examples of their use,
  • 20 Southern top tips highlighting the signatures of the Southern and how to model them, including EMUs, concrete, pull push, third rail,named trains, art deco / odeon architecture and more
  • a comprehensive motive power survey detailing all the ready to run locomotives currently available or due for release soon.

Hopefully the Magazine that also looks again at editor MIke Wild’s own extensive Southern Region layout Twelve Trees Junction, that I had the pleasure to operate at exhibitions, and the modellers guide will be of interest and use for modellers of the Southern as well as the Southern Region.

 

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Bachmann Europe advised at the start of the year, before the advent of Covid-19 a change to the way they make product announcements and that they would take place every quarter revealing new items that would be actually available in the following three months. The aim was that they would hold a product showcase event for members of their Collectors Club. Whilst Covid-19 has stopped the physical showcase event taking place Collectors Club members were able to get a sneak virtual preview of today’s announcement earlier this morning. Although no stand out new tooling has been announced we do see the launch of a new brand.

A new brand – EFE Rail

Bachmann Europe launch its all-new brand EFE Rail. The led by a new motorised version of the popular EFE 1:76 scale (OO) London Underground Tube Train. This much requested model is joined by a number of other Great British Model Railways to complete the launch range for EFE Rail.
The diecast model range Exclusive First Editions (EFE) has been part of the Bachmann Europe portfolio since 2016 and the new EFE Rail brand is an extension of this brand and sees an initial range includes numerous OO and N scale locomotives and wagons which have been produced in collaboration with third parties, such as Kernow Model Rail Centre and Heljan, to make these products accessible via Bachmann Europe Stockists for the first time.

The EFE Rail Motorised 1938 stock

The range in 00 initially includes six versions of the J94 0-6-0t  (reworked with a new coreless motor by The Kernow Model Rail Centre), four Class 35 Hymeks, and a number of JIA and PBA Wagons (also in conjunction with The Kernow Model Rail Centre.)
The N gauge range includes 12 versions of the Class 17 Clayton and 14t Mermaid side tipping wagon.
The majority of the new EFE Rail items are due to be released later this month with more to be added to the range in due course.

Bachmann 

The LMS 10000

The main new additions to the range include a class 40 with modified tooling and sound, and relevant to BR(s) modellers the missing LMS twin adding 10000 to run alongside the previously announced 10001 and will be available in BR Black with the early emblem.
A number of Class 66s, BR VBA and VDA wagons,   and also sound fitted Midland 1P 0-4-4 tanks (even as a southern modeller I can’t help but think they are delightful little engines!) top up the range.
Included within the August expected deliveries are the three versions of the Class 414 2-HAP 2-Car EMU 6061 BR (SR) Green, 6063 BR Blue & Grey and 4308 BR Network SouthEast that were first announced back in 2016.
Expected in October are the six versions of the 12t SR Box vans including both Plywood bodied, bauxite pristine and weathered; and 2+2 planking in LMS grey, BR grey weathered, bauxite weathered and GWR Grey.

Graham Farish

The Graham Farish range sees only the addition of two new livery Mk1 coaches including the Brake Composite in BR Intercity Charter livery. The brand new tooled LMS 8F will arrive this month along with the class 170/3 2 car DMU in South West Trains livery. The previously announced BR Mk1 Tourist 2nd open coach in BR(s) Green will arrive this quarter along with three versions of the SR 12t box van in SR Brown, LMS grey and BR bauxite.

Woodland Scenics and Scenecraft

Scenecraft N Gauge wooden engine shed

These ranges continue to grow with new additions to the woodland scenic range including grass tufts, a range of fencing types and different types of pre cabled wooden power poles and lines.
The N gauge Scenecraft range is further expanded with some scaled down versions of the 00 models and the addition of a wooden engine shed with cream and green paintwork that would not look out of place on a small Southern branchline.
The 00 ranges sees the reintroduction of the popular quayside stone walls.

The Bachmann announcement video can be viewed here and the full range and announcements can be seen on the Bachmann Europe website here.

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Dapol have today announced, or in reality re-announced, details of new tooling Maunsell High Window coaches in N gauge.  This is an expansion of the previously released low window versions. They will initially be produced in SR lined olive green and further liveries will be phased in to expand the range.

Three new tooled models cover a six compartment Brake Third (BTK), a Corridor Third (TK), a Corridor Composite (CK) and a Corridor First (FK).

Dapol SR BTK high window

Dapol SR CK high window

Dapol SR TK high window

The proposed releases, all SR Lined Olive Green are as follows:

  • 2P-014-001 Four Coach Set 193 comprising of BTKs nos. 3735 [sic should be 3758] / 3739 and CKs nos. 5640 and 5641 – £124.95
  • 2P-014-002 Six Coach Set 456 comprising of BTKs nos. 4083 / 4084, CK no. 5172, FKs nos. 7398 / 7399 and TK no. 837 – £186.95
  • 2P-014-003 Corridor Brake Third No. 3730 [sic not a Brake Third as their number range started 3732] – £31.95 ea
  • 2P-014-004 Corridor Composite No. 5635 – £31.95 ea
  • 2P-014-005 Corridor First No. 7228 – £31.95 ea
  • 2P-014-006 Corridor Third – £31.95 ea

The images shown are the initial Engineering Prototypes and for illustration only,  Dapol advise that they have already received livery samples and amendments returned to the factory (I hope the BTK number 3735 above is a typo as it should be number 3738, and also the proposed number of the loose BTK 3730 is not a BTK ) with production started and delivery expected by quarter 4 this year.

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This is the third in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s. In this post we remain in the Southampton Docks but in the 1920s heading into the 1930s.

Canute Road Quay in mid 1920s ‘Guernsey’ passes ‘Caen’ showing the two Southampton Docks liveries

‘Caen’ passes ‘Trueville’ both heading into the 1930s

Shunting continues on Canute Road Quay

No.88 in early SR livery visits the Docks shed as ‘Guernsey’ shunts

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) It therefore allows me to change the location and era with different rolling stock, vehicles and details.

In this case we have stayed at Canute Road Quay‘s intended setting but time travelled to a time between the wars moving from the roaring 1920s to the uncertain 1930s with the prospect of peace being unsettled and ruining the phrase “the war to end all wars”

Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case we still see the lovely range of Dapol B4 class 0-4-0 tanks bringing a splash of colour to the scene with the early Southampton Docks lined green livery being replaced during the 1920s with the possibly more familiar lined brown livery that was maintained until the B4 tanks were replaced at the Docks by the USA tanks after the second world war. We also see in this period colourful private owner wagons (before they were nationally pooled and unkempt during WW2).

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay may or may not be set in its usual location, so where and what era will it be…?

 

 

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Following on from my recent Talking Stock #38 The Adams B4 tanks post that included a brief history of the prototype and also a review of the recent range of Dapol ready to run models, I have added a few of these to my fleet for Canute Road Quay and therefore renamed and numbered to suit my preferred modelling period.

In all these instances I have not repainted the original model but used my time served method of a good quality enamel thinners applied to the original model printing and then after a soak of around 5 minutes or so rubbing off with a thinners soaked cotton bud. This does leave a shiny finish where the rubbing has been carried, but this is a good surface to apply fresh decals to.

I then leave the model to fully dry in a ventilated area for a day or so to ensure that no traces of the thinners remain. I then applied new decals from a number of sources depending on the model being created.

No. 82 has been repainted from no. 30084  Note the tool boxes have also been relocated to the slightly further forward position as per No.82

No. 89 Trueville

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition

For standard Southern Railway post war lettering I use Pressfix transfers from the HMRS Southern Bulleid Sheet 10 as per my backdating of No 30084 to No. 82. Note also that for this identity change I also relocated the tank top tool boxes slightly further forward as per No.82 in real life.

For ‘Trueville’ that utilised No. 90 ‘Caen’ as the base model in Southampton Docks lined brown livery. I used modified Pressfix SR coach lettering, to form all the required letters that I applied individually, also from the HMRS Bulleid sheet 10.

When Normandy left the docks in 1946 she was repainted in to post war black livery at Eastleigh and instead of regaining her number 96, she retained her name but it was applied in Bulleid post war ‘Sunshine’ style. This was obtained from Cambridge Custom Transfers via friend and excellent modeller Matt Wickham. I used the BR version of 30096 as the basis for this backdating.

Once the decals have been applied I spray with Railmatch Satin varnish from a rattle can to both seal the decals and restore a consistent finish, I then like to brush paint the smokebox, chimney, cab roof and cylinders matt black prior to weathering etc.

For those wanting to renumber BR versions, or simply wnating to enhance the fact that Dapol only print the smokebox door number plate directly onto the door with no representation of the number plate, etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby. 

Hopefully this demonstrates how quick and easy renumbering and renaming can be, as we can not expect a manufacturer to produce every number and variant that we might want. Should a full repaint be required then I have also adopted a reasonably quick and simple process and this is described in my Workbench Wittering #3 post here.

 

 

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The Bulleid Leader, a desperately sought after model, finally coming to life.

KR Models currently producing a RTR ‘GT3’ Gas Turbine, and taking expressions of interest in the ‘Fell’ have today announced the following:

“Leader was a class of experimental 0-6-0+0-6-0
articulated steam locomotive, 5 were planned but only one was completed, and was produced in the United Kingdom. It looked like a ‘new’ generation of diesel but was actually a steam powered loco. The Leader project was part of Bulleid’s desire to modernise the steam locomotive based on experience gained with the Southern Railway’s fleet of electric stock.”

Livery options are currently stating “brushed aluminium and BR Green” (See my notes below), but expressions of interest can be made on there website here https://krmodels.co.uk/collections/…/products/bulleid-leader

A few points to note:

The intention was in fact, and signed off by the board, to be a class of 30, but only the frames for the first 5 were laid down. 
The lined green livery was only a figment of the painting artist.
36001 ex works only carried 3 variations of the grey livery
Mixed traffic black was certainly discussed and 36001 was recorded inside the works in plain black but when she left the works was in unlined grey.

More information about the Bulleid Leader can be found in my Talking Stock #8 post here

My model of the Bulleid Leader in its very first livery before trials commenced

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Due to the expansion of the many small yards and docks the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) required a number of small tank locomotives. First introduced by Adams in 1891 the B4 class of 0-4-0 tanks comprised initially of two batches of ten built at Nine Elms works and the first ten were completed by 1892.

No. 88 of the first batch of 10 B4s in early SR lined livery

When compared with other 0-4-0t of the time the B4 class, were quite large in comparison. Even with their enclosed slightly cramped footplate, limited coal space; were powerful and so became popular with their crews. This first batch entered service across the LSWR network and were numbered 85 to 94

Guernsey’ as first introduced in 1893 in original lined green livery and cutaway cab

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition. Note cab differences

No. 90 ‘Caen’ in Docks lined brown livery.

The LSWR absorbed the Southampton Dock Company in November 1892 and it soon became clear that more powerful shunting locomotives would be required after a trial with one of the first batch of B4s, the first two of the second batch of ten were assigned to the Docks. In keeping with the existing Docks engines they were constructed with cut away cabs with a single central circular window, and carried names ‘Guernsey’ and ‘Jersey’ rather than numbers (later 176 and 81 respectively) and arrived, painted in a lined green livery, in the ‘Docks in November 1983. Of the remaining second batch numbers 95 to 100, 102 & 103, two more were built with the cut away cabs for the Docks becoming ‘Normandy’ (96) and ‘Brittany’ (97).
Between February and April 1896 a further four B4s were transferred to the docks and therefore also modified with cutaway cabs and names these were No.86 ‘Havre’, 93 ‘St Malo’, 95 ‘Honfleur’ and 102 ‘Granville’
Four more B4s made their way to docks, retaining their enclosed cabs: No. 85 becoming ‘Alderney’ and 98 ‘Cherbourg’ in April 1900 along with No.89 ‘Trouville’ and 90 ‘Caen in March 1901.

The livery of the B4s within the Docks changed during the 1920s from the in essence LSWR green livery to that of Brown with red lining and this remained as such, even post Grouping, until they left the Docks in 1946 where they gained standard Southern Railway livery of the time as per their non dock counterparts.

One of the Drummond K14 class later to be reclassified B4 class note the cab roof profile and dome mounted safety valves

During 1908 a further five shunting engines were introduced by Drummond, seventeen years after the first Adams B4s, there were initially classed as K14s but were essentially B4s with Drummond style boilers (identifiable by dome mounted safety valves) , chimneys and a slightly different cab roof  profile. The first two were sent to Southampton Docks and named ‘Dinard (147) and ‘Dinan’ (101). The rest were numbered 82 to 84. they were soon reclassified as members of the B4 class.

No.89 Trueville Note the linseed filtrator behind the dome

During their lifetime a few changes were made such as those in the Docks being fitted with a linseed filtrator that was mounted on the boiler to counter issues with the use of the sources of water used at the docks between 1901 and the early 1940s.
During the 1920s those cutaway cabs had the drivers side front sheet filled in and also acquiring side sheets of various homemade designs. Proper metal front and side sheets were eventually fitted to all for blackout purposes during the war.
The Adams and Drummond boilers were interchangeable and therefore during their life time some Adams built versions carried Drummond boilers and visa-versa, it is therefore important to refer to records and or photographs when considering a chosen prototype and period.

Dols B4 No. 87 and K14 No. 30084 for comparison

Dapol No. 87 and 96 for comparison

Dapol cab rears showing different tooling

B4s No. 30089 and 30096 front comparison

A trio of the Dapol B4s

Those pictured on this post are based on the recent two batches of Dapol and some of its variations. Dapol have tooled for some of the variations for a number of variations including four cab styles, Adams and Drummond boilers, buffer head sizes and different chimneys, however some compromises have been made and therefore there are a few errors including: possibly the number of boiler bands, variation combinations not appropriate to the particular livery (such as buffer head sizes), missing injector, missing front middle lamp iron (as fitted to some prototypes at the base of the smokebox door) and the cab ventilation holes just under the roof line front and rear are raised mouldings rather than actual holes (a possible translation from CAD to tool issue).

I also note that on the BR livery version the smokebox door number plate is unusually completely a transfer rather printing on a moulded or an etched plate (although this may possibly be an advantage to those like me that are repainting into an earlier livery).Etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby.  

Electrical Pick ups are, as you would expect and indeed necessary, wipers on all the rear of four wheels with an open slew wound five pole motor (rather than now more common can motors) driving the rear axle via a flywheel and gear tower. The front axle being sprung.

It also features a firebox glow which is quite dim, especially at low speeds on DC but might appear consistently brighter on DCC. No separate items are supplied for the owner to fit, with the exception of a unique very wide replacement tension lock coupling bar.
It should also be noted that of the seven Dapol models I have purchased two were dead on arrival (due to a misassembled bearing and a broken cylinder mounting bracket) that I fixed myself, and on Guernsey the cab rear panel was not seated properly leaving one of the handrails loose, but easily rectified. No 87 has both rear sandboxes with pipes loose in the packaging so needed gluing in place.

Despite the above comments it is overall a good model, performs well and very much a welcome addition to the fleet for Canute Road Quay as seen in action below.

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