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Posts Tagged ‘Southern Railway’

The Bulleid Leader, a desperately sought after model, finally coming to life.

KR Models currently producing a RTR ‘GT3’ Gas Turbine, and taking expressions of interest in the ‘Fell’ have today announced the following:

“Leader was a class of experimental 0-6-0+0-6-0
articulated steam locomotive, 5 were planned but only one was completed, and was produced in the United Kingdom. It looked like a ‘new’ generation of diesel but was actually a steam powered loco. The Leader project was part of Bulleid’s desire to modernise the steam locomotive based on experience gained with the Southern Railway’s fleet of electric stock.”

Livery options are currently stating “brushed aluminium and BR Green” (See my notes below), but expressions of interest can be made on there website here https://krmodels.co.uk/collections/…/products/bulleid-leader

A few points to note:

The intention was in fact, and signed off by the board, to be a class of 30, but only the frames for the first 5 were laid down. 
The lined green livery was only a figment of the painting artist.
36001 ex works only carried 3 variations of the grey livery
Mixed traffic black was certainly discussed and 36001 was recorded inside the works in plain black but when she left the works was in unlined grey.

More information about the Bulleid Leader can be found in my Talking Stock #8 post here

My model of the Bulleid Leader in its very first livery before trials commenced

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This months picture…

A change to the norm for picture of the month, one of my own favourites of 35006 Peninsular and Oriental S.N Co about to run around her train at Cheltenham Racecourse Station, taken at the annual 35006 Locomotive Society members and shareholders day, usually held in July.

More information about how you can support the 35006 Locomotive Society can be found here. 

PS. Happy we got rid American Independence Day to my USA readers on the 4th,  a date that is overshadowed by my own  birthday…

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Due to the expansion of the many small yards and docks the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) required a number of small tank locomotives. First introduced by Adams in 1891 the B4 class of 0-4-0 tanks comprised initially of two batches of ten built at Nine Elms works and the first ten were completed by 1892.

No. 88 of the first batch of 10 B4s in early SR lined livery

When compared with other 0-4-0t of the time the B4 class, were quite large in comparison. Even with their enclosed slightly cramped footplate, limited coal space; were powerful and so became popular with their crews. This first batch entered service across the LSWR network and were numbered 85 to 94

Guernsey’ as first introduced in 1893 in original lined green livery and cutaway cab

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition. Note cab differences

No. 90 ‘Caen’ in Docks lined brown livery.

The LSWR absorbed the Southampton Dock Company in November 1892 and it soon became clear that more powerful shunting locomotives would be required after a trial with one of the first batch of B4s, the first two of the second batch of ten were assigned to the Docks. In keeping with the existing Docks engines they were constructed with cut away cabs with a single central circular window, and carried names ‘Guernsey’ and ‘Jersey’ rather than numbers (later 176 and 81 respectively) and arrived, painted in a lined green livery, in the ‘Docks in November 1983. Of the remaining second batch numbers 95 to 100, 102 & 103, two more were built with the cut away cabs for the Docks becoming ‘Normandy’ (96) and ‘Brittany’ (97).
Between February and April 1896 a further four B4s were transferred to the docks and therefore also modified with cutaway cabs and names these were No.86 ‘Havre’, 93 ‘St Malo’, 95 ‘Honfleur’ and 102 ‘Granville’
Four more B4s made their way to docks, retaining their enclosed cabs: No. 85 becoming ‘Alderney’ and 98 ‘Cherbourg’ in April 1900 along with No.89 ‘Trouville’ and 90 ‘Caen in March 1901.

The livery of the B4s within the Docks changed during the 1920s from the in essence LSWR green livery to that of Brown with red lining and this remained as such, even post Grouping, until they left the Docks in 1946 where they gained standard Southern Railway livery of the time as per their non dock counterparts.

One of the Drummond K14 class later to be reclassified B4 class note the cab roof profile and dome mounted safety valves

During 1908 a further five shunting engines were introduced by Drummond, seventeen years after the first Adams B4s, there were initially classed as K14s but were essentially B4s with Drummond style boilers (identifiable by dome mounted safety valves) , chimneys and a slightly different cab roof  profile. The first two were sent to Southampton Docks and named ‘Dinard (147) and ‘Dinan’ (101). The rest were numbered 82 to 84. they were soon reclassified as members of the B4 class.

No.89 Trueville Note the linseed filtrator behind the dome

During their lifetime a few changes were made such as those in the Docks being fitted with a linseed filtrator that was mounted on the boiler to counter issues with the use of the sources of water used at the docks between 1901 and the early 1940s.
During the 1920s those cutaway cabs had the drivers side front sheet filled in and also acquiring side sheets of various homemade designs. Proper metal front and side sheets were eventually fitted to all for blackout purposes during the war.
The Adams and Drummond boilers were interchangeable and therefore during their life time some Adams built versions carried Drummond boilers and visa-versa, it is therefore important to refer to records and or photographs when considering a chosen prototype and period.

Dols B4 No. 87 and K14 No. 30084 for comparison

Dapol No. 87 and 96 for comparison

Dapol cab rears showing different tooling

B4s No. 30089 and 30096 front comparison

A trio of the Dapol B4s

Those pictured on this post are based on the recent two batches of Dapol and some of its variations. Dapol have tooled for some of the variations for a number of variations including four cab styles, Adams and Drummond boilers, buffer head sizes and different chimneys, however some compromises have been made and therefore there are a few errors including: possibly the number of boiler bands, variation combinations not appropriate to the particular livery (such as buffer head sizes), missing injector, missing front middle lamp iron (as fitted to some prototypes at the base of the smokebox door) and the cab ventilation holes just under the roof line front and rear are raised mouldings rather than actual holes (a possible translation from CAD to tool issue).

I also note that on the BR livery version the smokebox door number plate is unusually completely a transfer rather printing on a moulded or an etched plate (although this may possibly be an advantage to those like me that are repainting into an earlier livery).Etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby.  

Electrical Pick ups are, as you would expect and indeed necessary, wipers on all the rear of four wheels with an open slew wound five pole motor (rather than now more common can motors) driving the rear axle via a flywheel and gear tower. The front axle being sprung.

It also features a firebox glow which is quite dim, especially at low speeds on DC but might appear consistently brighter on DCC. No separate items are supplied for the owner to fit, with the exception of a unique very wide replacement tension lock coupling bar.
It should also be noted that of the seven Dapol models I have purchased two were dead on arrival (due to a misassembled bearing and a broken cylinder mounting bracket) that I fixed myself, and on Guernsey the cab rear panel was not seated properly leaving one of the handrails loose, but easily rectified. No 87 has both rear sandboxes with pipes loose in the packaging so needed gluing in place.

Despite the above comments it is overall a good model, performs well and very much a welcome addition to the fleet for Canute Road Quay as seen in action below.

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This months picture…

USA 0-6-0t No.68 shunts a Bogie Van B to towards the quayside. The USA Tank is the Model Rail Magazine commissioned model by Bachmann and the Bogie Van B is a Hornby model.

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Following on from marking the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe day earlier this month on 8th May, today marks 80 years on since the evacuation of Allied soldiers commenced from the beaches and harbour of Dunkirk, France, between 26 May and 4 June 1940. This is essentially a repost from 5 years ago but the sentiment remains true and strong.
The Dunkirk evacuation, code named Operation Dynamo, was decided upon when large numbers of British, French, and Belgian troops were cut off and surrounded by the German army. The event is renown for the use of a flotilla of 800 small ships used to assist in the ferrying of some 338,226 soldiers to safety.

southern-railway-coat-of-arms-1923-1948The Southern Railway played very much an unsung role in Operation Dynamo, as once back on English shores the soldiers that did not require immediate hospitalisation or were already based at local South Eastern England barracks were dispersed across England away from the main reception ports of Margate, Ramsgate, Folkestone, Dover, and Newhaven. During the nine period of Operation Dynamo the Southern Railway laid on and coordinated an amazing number of special trains comprising of : 327 from Dover, 82 from Ramsgate, 75 from Margate 64 from Folkestone and also 21 ambulance trains.
These trains, known as ‘Dynamo Specials’ moved 180,982 troops, many of these services were routed via  Redhill, Guildford and Reading, in order to bypass the capital and avoid congestion. Where possible during this period the Southern Railway maintained its usual passenger services with the except of some ‘omnibus replacement services’ to free the most heavily utilised routes between Guildford, Redhill and Tonbridge. Not only was coordination required of the departing trains but also the routing of the return empty stock workings and the necessary prepared engines required to keep the transportation of soldiers as quick and efficient as possible.

The Southern Railway mustered at very short notice nearly 2000 additional carriages, many borrowed from other railway companies including 47 complete rakes from the LNER, 44 from the LMS and 40 from the GWR.  Also 180 engines and crews were required from across the network, to operate these services.

To avoid delay at Dover and Ramsgate it was decided that the soldiers, many of whom had not eaten properly for days, would be fed on the trains. Just simply feeding the men provided Southern Railway with a major logistical problem,  therefore certain rail stations were designated feeding stations. These stations included Headcorn, Tonbridge and Paddock Wood Although the Royal Army Service Corps were primarily responsible many local Women’s Voluntary Service members were involved to provide food and drink, much of which was also donated or paid for with monies rasied from the local communities. Due to the number of trains involved only an eight-minute stop for soldiers to be provide with food and drink that bearing in mind this could have been 550 per train, was again an impressive feat.  Trains often had to pull into a siding at these food stops to ensure that any ambulance trains had priority over the use of the main lines.

Given that Southern Railway had practically no time to organise and plan such an activity, what it achieved without the use of modern day communication systems was very impressive; improvisation and word of mouth were the order of the day. One unknown Army general was famously heard to say: “I wish the Army could operate with as few written instructions as Southern Railway does in an emergency.”

The Southern Railway, as well as coping with troops from Dunkirk, was also evacuating no less than 48,000 school children from the coastal areas due to fear of a German invasion. It should not go unmentioned that a number of the Southern Railway’s shipping fleet and crew, varying from cross channel passenger vessels, Isle of Wight ferries and cargo vessels were actively involved out on the channel itself,  with a number being either badly damaged or lost to enemy action.

We should also pause to remember the 68,000 of our soldiers whom didn’t make it home safely from this particular French campaign.

I hope this post goes just a little way to remember and honour the part that the Southern Railway played in the overall success of Operation Dynamo out of what was a defeat in military terms in Flanders.

 

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The William Stroudley designed A1 / A1x class first introduced by the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSC) in 1872 and eventually the class comprised of 50 locomotives. Most were withdrawn in the very 1900s, however 21 gained a new lease of life and were fitted with new boilers and other modifications between 1912 and 1920 and became designated the A1X class. A few members of the original A1 class were sold by the LBSC to other railway companies, including the SECR, LSWR and Kent & East Sussex Railway and Isle of Wight Central Railway, and survived in A1 form, although even these were subject to many other modifications throughout their lifetime. Many of the class in various guises and conditions have survived into preservation.

32655 at Canute Road Quay. The firebox glow / flicker can be seen.

It is the many modifications, including boilers, smokeboxes, boiler fittings, air and or vacuum braking, wooden and metal brakes and rigging, a multitude of coal bunker sizes and shapes, coal rails, sandboxes and lamp iron positions to name a few, that provides such a challenge for any manufacturer.

The front 3/4 view

It should also be noted that as with ‘Brighton’ Tradition the side tanks were clad, which stood slight proud of the actual tanks, hence the visible recess in the tank top and the visible bolts on the outside cladding (that varied in number at different times).

The rear 3/4 view including the coal rails

The first 00 R-T-R Terrier was produced by Dapol in 1989, it was something of a compromise both dimensionally and also and hybrid of A1 and A1X details. One of the most obvious being both above and below footplate sand boxes.

The LH side

Dapol sold the tooling, along with others, to Hornby in 1996 and it has been as staple in their range since 1998, although latterly in the their ‘Railroad’ range. Dapol have since produced R-T-R version in both N and 0 gauges since.

Rails of Sheffield announced in March 2018 that they were working in partnership with Dapol to produce a new version that would include tooling to allow eventually for most variations of the A1, A1X and IOW variants of the locomotive to be produced, including two cab/bunker types, two smokebox/boilers. Wooden and metal brake rigging where appropriate.

Hornby then announced in January 2019 that they were including a brand tooling version of the Terrier in its own 2019 range. This is believed by many to have been a rushed ‘spoiler’ by Hornby and also £30 cheaper. Hornby had considered and dropped the idea of retooling before, however I can advise my understanding, that, this new tooling was already being worked on, although not by the actual Hornby team direct, but via another associated brand. Under the new Hornby management team, it was decided to move it in to the Hornby brand instead. This new Hornby version first reached the retailers back in April 2019, showing just how far advanced the development of the model was.

The front face, smokebox number plate too high and printed shed code plate

This post is look at the latest version from Rails of Sheffield and although not intending to be a direct comparison between the two manufacturers but in some cases, it is difficult not to make mention of both versions. Although I only have the one version myself so far, as illustrated, some of my comments are based on viewing other examples.

The Rails of Sheffield / Dapol version features: a die cast chassis and running plate along with plastic wheel centres (despite die cast being within the original advertised specification), the centre axle being sprung and pick-ups on each axle via fine wipers on the rear of each wheel, a 5 pole screw wound motor, a Next-18 DCC socket and also a firebox glow ./ flicker is included (very obvious, possibly too bright, even on DC) . Etched components are used for items such as the wing plates on the A1 version and for the different coal rails.

I will generally let the photographs speak for themselves however I make the following observations and comments. The model when checked against my available drawings matches all the key dimensions correctly (unlike the Hornby model that is approx. 1mm short along the length of the footplate). My model arrived missing its top smokebox lamp iron and there was no evidence of it being in the box, however she ran smoothly straight out of the box. The livery application is crisp, but perhaps not quite as well applied as the Hornby standard.

The chassis is well detailed with the correct style brakes and rods depending on the version, separate sand pipes are fitted, and the guard irons are a much better representation than the first batch of the new Hornby models (which is area I believe they have now retooled). A representation of the top of inside valve gear is nicely represented between the frames. The wheels are moulded with the correct spoke profile and the tyres chemically blackened which adds nicely to the look.
NEM coupling pockets are mounted on a sprung arm similar to the Dapol B4, I feel this possibly gives slightly to much side to side travel.

A close up of the cab interior and those coal rails

The inside of the cab features a back head with gauges that have printed dials, but none of the other items or pipework are painted. This appears to be a common single moulding across all versions, based on the earlier A1 cab, and does not include vacuum brake controls that should be present on my version. Hornby also appears to utilise a single backhead moulding but is based on the later A1X cab fittings. The The Rails of Sheffield / Dapol model is also fitted with a working firebox glow / flicker which is very effective (although possibly too bright) even on DC control.

A close up of the front and correct relationship between the buffer stocks and the running plate

The spectacle windows are nicely individually glazed (rather than and much better than a single glazing piece across both spectacles), the rims are picked out in brass paint, although they would have been painted body colour in BR days. I am still not convinced that they are not inset slightly too close together when looked at straight on. The rear spectacles have finely moulded glazing bars on my example.

The front generally captures the face nicely, especially well represented are the way the buffer stocks are mounted to and within the running plate, that is a very visible feature of the Terriers.
The smoke box number plate whilst nicely moulded to stand proud of the smokebox door is fitted to high compared to all the pictures I have seen, also the shed code plate is simply printed with no relief. All models appear to have a common air pipe, that on my version should be a spiral wound vacuum pipe.

The cab rear join within the cab roof can be seen

The tank tops are correctly recessed (unlike the first batch of the new Hornby model, see retool comment above) and all boiler mounted pipe work and lubricators and safety valves are nice separately applied items.

Looking at the rear, this is possibly the most disappointing area of the model. To enable the variations in the cab rear such as centre joint seam plate and rivets etc. the rear of the cab is a separate moulding and for some reason, unlike any other model I have seen this protrudes through the cab roof, rather than be joined under the roof. This join is visible even on the black version, let alone those earlier liveries with a white roof. I do not believe any version of the cab rear includes the bunker coal hole and shovel plate and neither is any representation of a coal load included.

By comparison the Hornby version, note the A1X cab interior, single glazing piece for both spectacles, missing guard irons, and incorrect buffer stock mounting, but better positioned coal rails. The top lamp iron and spectacle guards slightly over scale.

Probably the most obvious compromise area are the coal rails, although etched they are positioned within the bunker, rather than flush with the bunker outside edges and leaving an obvious and incorrect lip. I also believe the finely etched open coals on other versions to also be inset too much and under size. The rear top lamp iron position is fitted in the correct A1 position, which is possibly partly why, but not wholly why, such a compromise on the coal rail was required for those so fitted. The transition curve between the cab rear and bunker seems to be too larger a radius, when compared to photographs and drawings.
The same comments from the front view regarding the buffer stocks and air / vacuum pipe also applies to those on the rear.

Another view at Canute Road Quay

Overall, the A1 / A1X Terriers are a very complex prototype due to the longevity, alterations and multitude of detail differences that present such a challenge to manufactures to get the most out their tooling options verses compromises that have to be made.
It is certainly not as easy some people think or might have thought to make a perfect R-T-R model to cover all prototype modifications and variations within the constraints of mass production tooling.
In my view the version from Rails of Sheffield / Dapol might not be the ‘perfect’ or ‘pedigree’ Terrier, but it has the slight edge over the current competing product; being generally dimensionally correct and overall slightly finer. This is despite the cab rear / roof join / coal rails that I will amend when I repaint into SR ‘Sunshine’ black livery.

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Today marks 75 years since Victory in Europe Day or VE Day.
VE Day is the day on which Allied forces formally announced the surrender of Germany, which brought the Second World War to a close in Europe. The military surrender was first signed on May 7, but a slightly modified document with the final terms was signed on May 8 in Berlin. Celebrations immediately erupted throughout Britain and more than one million people celebrated in the streets. In London, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth appeared on the balcony alongside Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

Too late for printing in many diaries / calendars, in more normal times today was announced as being a Bank Holiday by moving the traditional May Day Bank Holiday Monday to today, although many at the moment must be wondering what is the difference?
Many celebrations and events were planned to mark the 75th Anniversary today, but the current Covid-19 lockdown (stay safe, stay at home and thank the NHS) has changed those plans.
Her Majesty the Queen will address the nation at 9pm, the exact time the Queen’s father, King George VI, made a radio announcement declaring the end of the war on the continent in May 1945, and I hope you will join the 2 minutes silence at 11 am this morning as we remember the sacrifices made by all.

The cover of the May 1945 Southern Railway Magazine. Note that it includes an image of 21C11 General Steam Navigation. (click the menu link above to find out more about the Restoration Society and it’s aim to restore 35011 back to this original condition)

By its obvious geographical nature the Southern Railway paid a vital part in the entire war effort. The dedication and efforts of the railway workers that worked tirelessly, in all too often difficult and life threatening conditions themselves, indeed many did also fall, should be remembered along with the military personnel.

In this post I provide details in numbers* of the efforts made under wartime conditions to put things into to perspective. Many will be familiar with some of the major events in which the railway played such a large part such as Operation Dynamo, the mass moving of personnel from Dunkirk 80 years ago at the end of this month, and of course Operation Overlord, the planning, logistics for the moment of men and machines to support D-Day in June 1944. For the Southern Railway it wasn’t just these two events but a continued effort for the duration.

Although the overall number of Southern Railway staff when compared between 1939 (67,680) and 1945 (67,570) didn’t change that much the number of women employed increased from 1,861 to 9,167. The company managed to maintain an operational workforce despite 10,956 men and 212 women being enlisted to active service during the same period.

The Southern Railway was to suffer severe damage, disproportionate to that of its three rivals. From July 1940 to March 1945, the LNER suffered 1737 incidents of enemy damage; the LMS experienced 1939 and the GWR fell victim to 1202. But in the same time the Southern Railway, covering a much smaller route mileage than the others, recorded 3637 incidents of damage through enemy action. This amounts to 170 incidents per 100 miles.

Between 1939 and VE Day the Southern Railway had moved 9,367,886 military personnel on 30,890 special troop trains, an additional 6,269,160 on duty service staff were carried on ordinary trains. 1,797 Ambulance trains carried 408,051 wounded. An additional 35,360 military freight trains were run.
At the outbreak of war the Southern Railway had 1,819 locomotives, 61 were built during the war comprising of: 1 Q Class 0-6-0, 40 Q1 class 0-6-0, 20 Merchant Navy Class 4-6-2 and 4 West Country Class 4-6-2. Whilst only 1 locomotive was destroyed by enemy action, 189 were damaged. A further 130 locomotives were built for other railway companies.
153 Carriages were destroyed by enemy action (Steam 49, Electric 93 and 11 NPCS), whilst 4,040 were damaged (Steam 1,806, Electric 1,784 and 450 NPCS).
An amazing 13,820 wagons were constructed: 7,500 for SR, 1,755 for LMS, 2,230 for LNER, 650 for GWR and 1,885 for Government WD of which 1,600 went overseas. 169 wagons were destroyed by enemy action, along with 69 Private Owner wagons, those damaged amounted to 1,355 along with 800 PO wagons.

At 11am this morning we should remember the 387 Southern Railway staff killed whilst on active service and 170 killed whilst on railway duty. A further 687 men and 59 women were injured by enemy action on duty.

I hope this post allows a pause for thought and reflection on the immense efforts and sacrifices made at the time.

*Source: War on the line: The Southern Railway in wartime, Bernard Darwin, published 1946

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This months picture…

A Drummond T14 4-6-0 “Paddlebox” 461 a NuCast kit is turned whilst 21C14 “Nederland Line” a Series 2 Merchant Navy Pacific, a Millholme kit, heads towards London with the ‘UP’ Devon Belle.

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I am far from being a ‘vlogger’ or a ‘youTuber’ and you will never get to watch me ‘unbox’ anything but I have often added video clips to illustrate posts throughout the site, I have now added a new page where I have collated some of these videos on one page with links where appropriate to the original post.

The new page can be found either here or by clicking on the video menu button above.

I have also added a Gallery of some of my favourite pictures from through my blog which can be found either here or by clicking on the Gallery menu button above.

As many of us currently have a little extra time on our hands, enjoy the content, relax and stay safe!

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As I posted earlier this week I usually attend and assist with the running of, the RM Web South West Area Group members day held nr. Taunton.

This year we are unable to do so but this has not deterred the organisers from marking the event but this year it will be in a ‘virtual’ form on RMweb. with pictures, video and chat from participants past and present to raise money for the NHS Charities Together Covid-19 Appeal who are working with NHS England and their member NHS Charities on a nationally coordinated response to the difficulties affecting us all.

The event is taking place this weekend and is hosted on RMweb. At the time of posting over £6000 has already been raised or the NHS Charities Together Covid-19 Appeal!

I have already posted content about Canute Road Quay in the layouts section, with a few new videos, including the one below, the full post, pictures and videos can seen here.

I’ve also posted about Fisherton Sarum with some pictures and a video here. So two layouts at the same show, that’s unusual…

So come along and join in if you are not already a member of the RM Web community,  simply sign up its free!

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