Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Southern Railway’

It is now less than two week to go to Canute Road Quay’s appearance at the excellent Railex exhibition organised by friends at the Princes Risborough and District MRC, being held at Stoke Mandeville Stadium, Stadium Approach, Aylesbury, Bucks, HP21 9PP on the 26th and 27th May  and I have been busy with final preparations.

An overall view of Canute Road Quay. Picture copyright and courtesy C Nevard and Model Rail

Even with a small layout like Canute Road Quay good preparation is required to ensure things go as smoothly, and just as importantly enjoyably, at the show. Canute Road Quay being only 5ft x 1 ft is somewhat easier to load and set up at a show than Fisherton Sarum but the steps for getting ready for a show are pretty much the same. The preparations, some are more obvious than others, include the following:

  • preparing packing the stock being taken and just as importantly in my case deciding what stock not to take!
  • track and stock cleaning, to ensure good reliable and slow speed running
  • checking coupling heights and uncoupler operation
  • general layout cleaning and dusting etc.
  • preparing and packing the loose detailing items (vehicles and packing crates etc.)
  • layout ancillaries, including:  transformer box, cables, lighting transformers, trestle supports, extension leads, curtains, spare controller, name badges, and relevant tools
  • operator comforts including: high stool, mugs (for the all important tea) and sweets and snacks (to keep up energy levels and act as a bribe for my fellow operator(s))
  • paperwork: show information and layout information sheets for prospecting exhibition managers
  • arranging operators to assist me at the show, somewhat easier with Canute Road Quay (in this case just the the one, in in the form of  friend and fellow modeller Simon Paley), than the larger number required for Fisherton Sarum!
  • overnight bag, if required, but not in the case of Railex as it is only 20 minutes from home

The revised fiddle yard arrangement the split cassettes feed arm can be seen

I have also made a small change to the way the cassettes in the off scene fiddle yard (a grand title for what is really just a shelf…) are handled and the electric feed provided. This is to make it easier to connect the cassette as previously I had two phosphor bronze spring clips fixed to the base which both provided the power feed to the aluminium section on each side and also ensured correct  alignment with the exit road. This arrangement also meant that the cassettes had to be aligned and slid in from the left hand end which was not all that practical due to the overrun protection at that side of the yard.

A closer view of the power feed arm and spring clip

I have now changed the nearest power feed and cassette alignment clip to be on a small lifting arm made from a suitable shaped piece of wood, complete with a nice little brass drawer handle. This enables the spring clip to be moved upwards and out of the way of the side of the cassette.
This arrangement now gives two advantages: firstly the cassettes can slid in and aligned easier from the front operating position; and secondly means that even with cassette in position the arm can be lifted isolating the cassette, where previously the cassette was live when the layout feed it adjoins to was live.

The feed arm in the up position

The cassettes I am using on Canute Road Quay, as I have mentioned before on this blog, are the 12″ loco cassettes from Fisherton Sarum and the some of these are made up on one side with two 6″ lengths of aluminium angle which I bridge electronically with a bulldog type clip and this allows for further isolation of a tank locomotive at the far end of the cassette.

Further to my previous post here about visitors to the quay  I have making some changes and or finishing touches to a couple of the locos in my fleet which may make and appearance the weekend, both are examples of the latest releases from Hatton’s in the shape of their delightful ex SECR P class 0-6-0t,  see my review here, and also their 14″ Andrew Barclay

A Hatton’s P Class now detailed and weathered

The P Class No 1558 already suiting my 1946 to 1949 modelling period being in post war SR black with ‘Sunshine’ style lettering has had crew fitted (in case the excellent ModelU 3D printed examples produced by Hatton’s specifically to fit the P Class), real coal added to the bunker and has been weathered.

The modified and weathered Hatton’s Andrew Barclay

My Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t has now been modified by replacing the existing buffers with wooden dumb buffers. The original standard buffers simply pull out and then the area of the bufferbeam filled flat to remove the rivet head detail. The wooden dumb buffers have been fashioned from rectangular plastic rod and suitably painted.

A further view of the Andrew Barclay

I have removed the original WTT branding in my usual way by rubbing with a cotton bud loaded with enamel thinners. As coal bunker space is pretty non-existent on these locomotives, having seen it photographs of the real thing added a couple of sacks of spare coal on just inside the cab and the other balanced on the running plate.  She has then been weathered to represent a pretty unkempt condition of such locomotives that were used on some of the other lines and private wharfs that existed in and around Southampton  area especially along the River Itchen. Like the P Class crew has been added using the ModelU 3D printed examples produced by Hatton’s.

If you are planning to visit Railex please make sure you come and say hello. I am stand 61, towards the right hand back corner (as you come into the hall)

 

Read Full Post »

This months picture…

USA 0-6-0t  No. 68 is about the cross the road in front of the small sub shed on Canute Road Quay. The USA tank is a model rail Magazine commissioned loco by Bachmann

Read Full Post »

It has been a busy period recent both in the arrival of some new ready to run models such as the Hatton’s ex SECR P class 0-6-0t,  see my review here, and also their 14″ Andrew Barclay along with some time spent applying some finishing decals prior to weathering of a couple of kit built models namely the ex LBSC D1  0-4-2t and ex SECR S Class 0-6-0st. All these models still require a little work, including in some cases repainting and numbering and also weathering. Some of you may have seen some of these pictures before on my twitter feed. 

SECR P Class 754 in WW1 grey livery

With the arrival of the Hatton’s P class I took the opportunity to temporarily move the location of Canute Road Quay further South east and backdate to earlier than my usual 1946-49 modelling period, including some of my earlier style wagons that do not usually get an outing. It is one of the advantages of having such a layout that has no real identifiable items to identify the actual time period.

ex SECR P Class 1555

Eventually to suit my preferred time period: No. 754 will be repainted and numbered to become  her later identity of No. 1557 in SR post war black livery, being one of the first two built with the slightly higher cab; whilst No. 1555 will be renumbered and lettered as No. 31555 with full ‘British Railways’ Sunshine lettering to represent her condition in early 1948.

ex LBSC D1 Class No. 2357

The ex LBSC D1 0-4-2t is built from a South Eastern Fincast white metal kit. In fact a couple of examples of the class, including No. 2286 are know to have been used at Southampton docks for a while in mid 1930s up to WW2 so I am not actually stretching history too far by running my model of no. 2357 on Canute Road Quay albeit in a slightly later post war-time period, although she was technically allocated to Ashford at the time so she is obviously on loan.

Andrew Barclay 14″ before being modified with wooden dumb buffers and weathered

The Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t will be modified to replace the existing buffers with wooden dumb buffers, have the WTT branding stripped off and suitably weathered to represent the condition of such locomotives that were used on some of the other lines and private wharfs that existed in and around Southampton  area especially along the River Itchen.
I also have a Hornby Peckett on order, that I will likewise modify with wooden dumb buffers to give some further variety to locomotives at Canute Road Quay and differ from the standard RTR versions. I will post details of this conversion in due course.

ex SECR S Class No. 1685

The ex SECR S Class 0-6-0 saddle tank No. 1685 is also built from South Eastern Fincast white metal kit. The S Class was in fact only one locomotive due to a requirement for a heavy shunter at Richborough Port during WW1 and so was converted from a C Class 0-6-0 tender locomotive, after the war she was transferred to Bricklayers Arms until withdrawal in 1951. Like the ex LBSC D1 she must be on load to Canute Road Quay.

ex LSWR B4 Class No. 100

With Canute Road Quay’s appearance looming at the excellent Railex exhibition organised by friends at the Princes Risborough and District MRC, being held at Stoke Mandeville Stadium, Stadium Approach, Aylesbury, Bucks, HP21 9PP on the 26th and 27th May 

USA Tank No. 70

I have started to return Canute Road Quay to its intended Southampton-ish location and the ex LSWR B4 0-4-0 and USA 0-6-0 tanks have returned along with suitable rolling stock and uncouplers etc all wheel cleaned, tried and tested in readiness for what I know will be an enjoyable weekend playing trains, shunting and talking.

USA Tank No.68

If you are planning to visit Railex please make sure you come and say hello. I am stand 61, towards the right hand back corner (as you come into the hall) and will ably assisted by friend and fellow modeller Simon Paley for the weekend, he being the much younger looking operator!

I hope this post has been of interest and as stated above it does show the advantages of having a layout that is not an actual real location but endeavours to capture a flavour and also is not easily identifiable to a specific time period. I also intend to occasionally run in a later 1960s period with a few diesel shunters so more on this in a future post.

Read Full Post »

The small manufacturer of Ready To Run locomotive 00 Works announced back in May 2017 their intention to produce a batch of ex LSWR Drummond 4-4-0 D15s  A number of the versions have now arrived from 00 Works, although as with many of their releases I have not personally ordered one myself (I already have a couple of kit built examples,  that can be seen here in my Talking Stock #17 post along with some further details on the prototype) I am indebted to friend and fellow Southern modeller Tony Teague for once again providing his photographs and comments below.

This release follows on from a number of Southern locomotive produced by the ’00’ Works in the past such as: N15, 700, C, E4, I3 and 0415 Adams Radial classes (although of course some of these have now all been subsequently been announced or produced by the major manufacturers). The level of detail of these models has steadily improved over time, although is still not as high as we see from the likes of Hornby and Bachmann, or from if built carefully from kits. No other ready to run D15 exists although kits have been available in the past  from BEC and PDK

No. 463 The 00 Works ex LSWR D15 class
Tony advised: Having just taken delivery of the new 00 Works D15 loco in Southern olive green, I am pleased to say that it was extremely well packed, has a lot of weight above the driving wheels and captures the essence of Drummond’s original locomotive. As with 00 Works’ previous Southern loco (the I3 tank) the model has some interior cab detail, and wire handrails, whilst the lined olive livery is very well executed, however, this is a “limited run” RTR loco and at £280 it is not cheap; on this basis there are a number of niggles, some of which could perhaps have easily been resolved. 

A head of view by comparison with OO Works D15 left and kit built PDK version right
The moulded coal in the bunker does not look good and is not easily removable, so it will need some real coal to cover it; if real coal is not supplied, then my personal preference would be for the tender to be modelled empty. A tension lock coupling was fitted to the front of the loco and this was easily removed, although no alternative was supplied. Although the coupling rods are blackened, the wheel rims are not and look too shiny, there is no rivet detail around the boiler (which is prominent on the prototype), and although the top and bottom lamp irons are fitted, the two central ones (which should be on either side of the smoke box) are not represented; finally, brake hangars and blocks are modelled but there is no brake rigging.
Tony continued; On my particular model, the fixed loco to tender coupling was holding the front tender wheels off the track – which was easily adjusted, whilst the red cabside oval plates did not have the loco number within them. 

The understaide of the 00 Works D15
The model is fitted with a coreless motor which is new for 00 Works, and whilst it appears powerful it seems noisier than other recent release from the mainstream manufacturers, however, my biggest problem arose from the way in which the loco is wired. It has pickups on one side of the loco and on the opposite side of the tender only – so of 14 available wheels (including the front bogie) the loco only picks up from 5 –  a single wire connects the loco and tender (see picture). I spoke to Roderick Bruce at 00 Works and he described the way in which the loco was wired as “the American standard”; he also pointed out that his previous tender locos have been wired the same way.

Tony’s PDK kit built version to allow a comparison

I have since remedied this by fitting additional pick-ups to the opposite side of the loco, however, the conversation did cause me to look at my other 00 Works locos and perhaps unsurprisingly, I had noted 3 of them as being “poor runners” that I had yet to attend to. I have since fitted additional pick-ups to each and this has resolved all of the running issues, however, this does make me wonder whether it is reasonable these days to provide so few pick-ups – particularly on a 4-4-0 loco!
Once the wiring was remedied, I put the loco onto a test train consisting of 8 x Hornby Pullmans and it was able to pull away on the flat – albeit with some wheel-slip – and make good speed; once run in it may perhaps do better.

Overall I am now happy with the loco, but it needed some tweaking to get to this point. Given that there is no mainstream RTR model of the D15 available, the 00 Works model remains a good choice, because the kit-built option will cost at least double – unless you are going to build the kit yourself. Nevertheless I think it would be fair to say that there is “room for improvement”!

From my own view of the images Tony supplied and those I have seen elsewhere an area that has slightly let down the finish of the 00 Works releases in the past has been the highly visible carrier film to decals especially the numbers, although Tony’s example in SR Olive Greens looks OK I have seen that this issue still exists on their numbered releases, especially the lined BR versions.

Despite these small issues the model from 00 Works fills a niche gap in the RTR market and a with little additional detail makes a fine model. Thanks again for Tony for his pictures and comments on this model.

Read Full Post »

Hatton’s only announced their production of the ex SECR Wainwright P Class tanks after first Engineering Prototypes had been received back in September last year as I reported in my “Can I have a P please” post, here. Although it was hoped to be able to deliver these before the end of last year Hattons should be congratulated in getting 10 of the 12 initially announced versions to the market last week, a refreshingly short process time especially as this is the first locomotive project that Hatton’s have handled direct with the manufacturing company in China. The two SECR lined livery versions will be following shortly.

A side on view of No. 1558

Although only eight P class locomotives were built, there were a number of differences between the members of the class and during their lifetime and Hatton’s have certainly risen exceptionally well to the challenge.

The separately applied items are clear here on No. 1558

The first two members of the class introduced in February 1909 numbers 753/556/1556/31556 and 754/557/1557/31557 had 4 and half inch taller cabs and side tanks than the remaining six members that were built in February and July 1910. Although only a small difference in height it is noticeable when the locos are side by side.

A rear 3/4 view of No. 1555 (which will become 31555 in 1948 livery)

Hatton’s have tooled for both cab / tank height styles, the two different smokeboxes with different rivet patterns, two main types of buffers, alternative rear steam heating pipes, smokebox lubricators, number plates (where applicable) and with or without glazing bars on the rear cab spectacles.

The first 12 version announced by Hatton’s are as follows:

  • H4-P-01 No. 178 in SECR lined green, 1910-11 (as preserved) short cab, SR Buffers, smokebox with 1 row of rivets and lubricator
  • H4-P-02 No. 753 in SECR lined green, 1909-11 (as preserved) tall cab, SR Buffers, rear window bars, smokebox with 2 rows of rivets and lubricator
  • H4-P-03 No. 754 in SECR wartime grey, 1910-1920s, tall cab, Bottle buffers, higher steam pipes and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-04 No. A325 in Southern Railway lined olive green, 1924 to mid 1930s, short cab, bottle buffers, rear window bars, higher steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-05 No. 1555 in Southern Railway black, 1938-48, short cab, bottle buffers, rear window bars, higher steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-06 No. 1558 in Southern Railway black with Sunshine lettering, 1941-48, short cab, bottle buffers, rear window bars, higher steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-07 No. 31027 in BR black with early emblem, 1949 to withdrawal in 1961, short cab, SR buffers, rear window bars, higher steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-08 No. 31323 in BR black with late crest, 1959-61, short cab, SR buffers, rear window bars and smokebox with 1 row of rivets
  • H4-P-09 “Pioneer II” in Bowaters Paper Mill lined green, 1958-61 (ex 178/1178/31178) short cab, SR buffers, no vacuum pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-10 “Pride of Sussex” in Robertsbridge flour mill green, 1961-71, (ex 53/556/1556/31556), tall cab, SR buffers, no steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-11 No. 27 “Primrose” in Bluebell Railway lined black, 1961-63, short cab, SR buffers, rear window bars and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-12 No. 323 in Bluebell lined blue (as preserved) short cab, SR buffers, lubricator and smokebox with 1 row of rivets

A 3./4 rear view of No. 754 in SECR war time grey note no glazing bars on the rear cab spectacles. (which will become No. 1557 in SR post war black livery)

The model is supplied in a Hatton’s branded sturdy foam lined box and further protected by the now common up and over plastic tray in a plastic sleeve. It should be noted that this outer sleeve is a very tight fit so care should be taken trying to access the model. I also positively note that packing allows for the tension lock couplings to remain in place.

Four and half inches does not equate to much in 4mm scale but as can be seen it is just noticeable with the high cab to the right on 754

Hopefully the pictures of three of the models with in this post will speak for themselves. I am certainly very impressed with the build quality (although on  the rear sprung buffers was loose on one of my examples), finesse and level of separately applied details such as: fine blackened handrails, detailed cab interior,  drain cocks, oil lubricators, brass whistle, lamp irons front and rear, smokebox number plate (i.e. not moulded) on BR versions.

A 3/4 front view of No. 1558

An accessory bag of further detaining parts is provided that contains: buffer beam coupling hooks with cosmetic screw link couplings, steam heating pipes of a type relevant to the livery of the loco, 3 off SR Engine Head Signal discs (referred to incorrectly as “Route Indicator Disks” within the supplied instruction sheet) an SR style lamp and what  must be a first for an R-T-R model 3 off tiny oil cans!

The Sunshine style lettering also incorrectly includes the inner black line within the numerals (click to enlarge)

The livery application is very crisp and a nice stain finish, very much as we have come to expect from current R-T-R models. Manufacturers build plates and the SECR ownership plates (where applicable) are printed rather than separate etched items. I have however spotted that the SR post war black version the ‘Sunshine’ numerals are incorrect in that they should not have the inside black line as this was only applied to the ‘Southern’ lettering.

A view into the cab showing the printed dials

Within the cabs the various gauges are part of the spectacle glazing insert they have dials / needles nicely printed on them although the moulding also has the copper pipe runs to these gauges but have been left unprinted / painted.

With its 5 Pole motor within the boiler and gearbox within the firebox (allowing the daylight gap under the boiler), boiler weights and all wheel pick up the performance is smooth and reliable at all speeds. A 6 pin DCC socket is included, accessed by the removal of the body, simply achieved via the four screws located on the underside either side of the NEM coupling pockets. Not surprisingly in a model of such small prototype sound fitting will be a slight challenge requiring some modelling skills but helpfully Hatton’s have suggested a process for achieving this within the supplied instruction sheet.

Canute Road Quay could occasionally be relocated further South East ..

My No. 1558 will be simply weathered, whilst No. 1556 will be changed to one of the current missing livery options as her later early 1948 identity of No.31556 with ‘British Railways’ in SR Sunshine lettering style, whilst tall cab No. 754 will become her later 1557 identity in SR post war black as per No. 1558.  As there are still possibly two or three some other livery versions possible some of these might yet appear so watch this space.

In conclusion  as I am sure you can tell Hatton’s have produced and excellent model and with the number of versions announced should be very popular for modellers of the South East from all periods including the preservation era.

Read Full Post »

This months picture…

A Drummond T14 class ‘Paddlebox’ 4-6-0 No. 30466 in early British railways livery passes Fisherton Sarum on a rake of Diagram 1774 40T ballast hoppers. The T14 is a Nucast white metakl kit and the ballast hoppers modified Lima models

Read Full Post »

Rails Limited in partnership with Dapol and the National Railway Museum announced at this weekends London Festival of Railway Modelling that they will produce the LBSC Terrier and all its subsequent variants in OO Gauge.

With all the experience Dapol has gained from making the award winning O Gauge version of the A1 / A1X Terrier it is fully anticipated that this project will progress very quickly. Decorated samples are expected to be available Autumn 2018.

Initially six livery versions will be available in DCC ready, DCC and DCC Sound fitted:

  • A1X No. 32655 in BR lined black with early crest
  • A1 No. 82 Boxhill in LBSC Stroudley improved engine green.
  • A1 Bodiam in KESR Blue
  • A1X No. 751 in SECR lined green
  • A1X No. 2644 in Southern post 1931 lines Olive Green
  • A1X No. 32661 in BR lined black with late crest

The tooling will allow eventually for most variations of the A1, A1X and IOW variants of the locomotive to be produced, including two cab/bunker types, two smokebox/boilers. Wooden and metal brake rigging where appropriate.

The announced specification includes:

  • Diecast chassis and running plate
  • Detailed plastic moulded body
  • Many separately fitted parts
  • Diecast wheels with sprung centre driving wheels to give compensation providing all wheel electrical pick up and better traction
  • DCC and sound Ready with easy access through a removable body which exposes a NEXT-18 socket
  • DCC and DCC Sound Fitted variants using Dapol’s own sound recording of 32678 on the Kent and East Sussex Railway
  • Powerful 5 pole skew wound motor
  • Factory sound fitted locomotives will feature RealDrive braking control

Pricing has been announced as being £110.00 each (DCC Ready), DCC Fitted Versions £140 / DCC Sound Versions £239 with pre ordering being recommended and secured with a £30 deposit.

These models will superceed the now much long in the tooth and slightly hybrid Dapol / Hornby Model. Full details can be found on the Rails website here

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: