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Posts Tagged ‘Southern Railway’

This coming Saturday, 7th July, sees Canute Road Quay attending the Beaconsfield Model Railway Club’s one day exhibition.

The whole of Canute Road Quay. Picture courtesy and copy right C Nevard / Model Rail

The Beaconsfield MRC exhibition is being held at the The Beaconsfield School, Wattleton Road, Beaconsfield, HP9 1SL and is open between 10.30 and 5pm . The venue is conveniently only 5 mins of Junction 2 of the M40.
In addition to Canute Road Quay there will be 15 or so other layouts including a number of Southern / Southern Region interest such as: Brighton East (EM), Portsea (3mm), Thunders Hill (3mm) and Tidworth (00).

If you are planning a visit to this pleasant show, please make sure you come by Canute Road Quay and say hello.

 

 

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This months picture…

Bulleid merchant Navy 21C14 heads towards Salisbury past Fisherton Sarum shed. 21C14 is a Millholme white metal kit

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Ok it is not the proper Atlantic Coast Express , but I’m off for a much welcome summer break to a lovely island where the main airport code is coincidental ACE! Anywho, before I depart for some sun, sea, volcanoes and relaxation I will also leave you with a photo review and few very quick initial thoughts on the new Dapol ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0t in 00

Merchant Navy 21C6 complete with ACE headboard on Fisherton Sarum

The Atlantic Coast Express was probably the most misnamed of all the Southern Railway named trains but was a stroke of genius at the same time. Why misnamed you might ask, well of the ten different termini served by the train there was only one that was actually on the Atlantic Coast itself!  The genius of the name, however, a result of a competition run in the Southern Railway staff magazine in 1924 credited to Guard F. Rowland* of Woking, was its simple initials ‘ACE’.

Moving on to the Dapol ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0t, first announced in March 2014  it has now hit the retailers.

Dapol B4 No. 88

My immediate first impression is that the model is quite light, certainly lighter than recent small tank releases such as the Horny Peckett and the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay. Despite the lack of weight they have run nicely albeit briefly on Canute Road Quay.

A rear 3/4 view of No. 88

The B4s were not a large class but as usual were a minefield of subtle and not so subtle variations over time such as: cabs, boilers, chimneys and buffers.

A view of BR late crest version No. 30096. Note the larger buffers (none are sprung) and different style cab

Dapol have tooled for some of these variations but have also managed at first glance to achieve a few errors including: possibly the number of boiler bands, variation combinations not appropriate to the particular livery (such as buffer head sizes), missing injector, missing front middle lamp iron (as fitted to some prototypes at the base of the smokebox door) and the cab ventilation holes just under the roof line front and rear are raised mouldings rather than actual holes (a possible translation from CAD to tool issue).

B4s No. 30089 and 30096 front comparison

I also note that on the BR livery version the smokebox door number plate is unusually completely a transfer rather printing on a moulded or an etched plate (although this may possibly be an advantage to those like me that will be repainting into an earlier livery).

Rear cab comparison between No. 30096 and 30089

There is also a pronounced joint line apparent around the front of the smokebox.

Electrical Pick ups are, as you would expect and indeed necessary, wipers on all the rear of four wheels with an open slew wound five pole motor (rather than now more common can motors) driving the rear axle via a flywheel and gear tower.

A trio of B4s

It also features a firebox glow which is quite dim, especially at low speeds on DC but might appear consistently brighter on DCC. No separate items are supplied for the owner to fit, with thee exception of a  unique very wide replacement tension lock coupling bar, but I am not convinced it will work well in conjunction with the lightly sprung close coupling NEM pocket.

Despite the initial comments above, I am sure the Dapol B4 will still be popular with most SR modellers and from normal viewing distances looks ok and runs well.

Normal service of posting will be back in a couple of weeks, with perhaps more on the B4 and also some views of the Heljan 07.

 *footnote, it is unfortunate to record that Guard Roland although based at Woking at the time of the competition moved shortly after to Torrington (one of the ACE’s destinations) but sadly just six years later became the only person to killed on the North Cornwall Railway due to a shunting accident.

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Following on from the release earlier this year of their delightful SECR P Class 0-6-0t Hatton’s have today announced that four new versions of the SECR P Class will soon be available. Based on feedback from the modelling community, Hatton’s will be producing extra SECR lined green and BR liveries, with new running numbers; and for the first time they will produce two ROD (Railway Operating Division) locomotives.
Production sample locomotives have been approved and they are on the way to their store now.

The four new versions of the Hatton’s P Class

The four new variants are:

  • H4-P-013 – 5027 in ROD green
  • H4-P-014 – 5753 in ROD green
  • H4-P-015 – 27 in SE&CR full lined green (with polished brass)
  • H4-P-016 – 31556 in BR black with early emblem

ROD Version No. 5027

The ‘ROD’ liveried P Classes were sent to Boulogne for a few years during WW1 for shunting at dockyards. On return to the UK, they were also seen working at Dover and Folkestone. These WW1-era locos will be perfect for a variety of UK or continental wartime layouts.

SECR Livery version No. 27

The SECR liveried locomotive will feature a new colour for the polished brass dome and safety valve. The new colour represents polished brass, which is halfway between our original release of P Classes 178 & 753; and Hornby’s H Class.

The new locomotives will be available on Friday 17th August 2018 for the same price of £99. All four are available to pre-order from Hatton’s now!

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Model Rail Magazine in cooperation once again with Canadian manufacture Rapido Trains, (their previous collaboration the ex GER J70 is close to delivery) is to be producing the LBSCR Class E1 0-6-0T. Officially being announced with the publication date of the July issue No. 249 of their magazine on June 7th, however with  subscriber copies now having been delivered the information is in the public domain.

E1 Class as currently on the Isle of Wight steam railway, masquerading as W2. Originally B110 and sold to industrial use in 1927

With the exception of the final six built in 1891 under the auspices of RJ Billington with different boiler, dome and chimney known as E1s from new, the rest of the 80 strong class were originally introduced by William Stroudley from 1874 as the E Class. Essentially a larger goods version of the A1 Terrier 0-6-0t, using the same cylinders, motion and boilers as the D Class 0-4-2 passenger tanks. Later all the E Class were reclassified as E1s.

E class 686 in LB&SCR livery. Picture courtesy and copyright Mike Morant collection

Although most of the class worked on the Brighton section some were used In Southampton Docks, so ideal for Canute Road Quay, and on the Isle of Wight. Ten members of the class were converted between 1927 and 1929 to become E1/R Class 0-6-2t with new cabs, extended bunkers and the addition of a Radial axel for use in the West Country.

E1 class 2506 in post war’Sunshine’ black livery. Picture courtesy and copyright Mike Morant collection

Although withdrawals started as early as 1913 many passed into British Railways ownership with the last surviving to 1960. Four members of the class ended up being sold into industrial colliery use, including the one preserved example B110 now located on the Isle of Wight steam railway.

The initial Model Rail Magazine versions to be available, during 2020, are as follows:

  • MR-401  97 – LBSCR Stroudley Improved Engine Green
  • MR-402  127 – LBSCR Stroudley Goods Green
  • MR-403  B96 – Marsh umber but with ‘B’ prefix as applied by SR
  • MR-404  2142 – SR black (pre-War)
  • MR-405  2606 – SR black, ‘sunshine’ lettering
  • MR-406  32151 – BR lined black, no emblem
  • MR-407  32113 – BR plain black, early emblem
  • MR-408  32689 – BR plain black, early emblem (weathered)
  • MR-409  W2 – SR (IoW) lined green
  • MR-410  W4 – BR (IoW) black, early emblem

They will be available soon to be pre-ordered via the Model Rail Offers website managed by the Kernow Model Rail Centre.

Full details of the specification to follow.

Also announced by Model Rail Magazine, also via Rapido Trains is the BR(w) 0-6-0 16xx Class pannier tanks.

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This months picture…

USA 0-6-0t No 72 still with original style bunker and cab shunts at the warehouse on the quayside on Canute Road Quay. She is a repainted Model Rail commissioned loco by Bachmann

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It is now less than two week to go to Canute Road Quay’s appearance at the excellent Railex exhibition organised by friends at the Princes Risborough and District MRC, being held at Stoke Mandeville Stadium, Stadium Approach, Aylesbury, Bucks, HP21 9PP on the 26th and 27th May  and I have been busy with final preparations.

An overall view of Canute Road Quay. Picture copyright and courtesy C Nevard and Model Rail

Even with a small layout like Canute Road Quay good preparation is required to ensure things go as smoothly, and just as importantly enjoyably, at the show. Canute Road Quay being only 5ft x 1 ft is somewhat easier to load and set up at a show than Fisherton Sarum but the steps for getting ready for a show are pretty much the same. The preparations, some are more obvious than others, include the following:

  • preparing packing the stock being taken and just as importantly in my case deciding what stock not to take!
  • track and stock cleaning, to ensure good reliable and slow speed running
  • checking coupling heights and uncoupler operation
  • general layout cleaning and dusting etc.
  • preparing and packing the loose detailing items (vehicles and packing crates etc.)
  • layout ancillaries, including:  transformer box, cables, lighting transformers, trestle supports, extension leads, curtains, spare controller, name badges, and relevant tools
  • operator comforts including: high stool, mugs (for the all important tea) and sweets and snacks (to keep up energy levels and act as a bribe for my fellow operator(s))
  • paperwork: show information and layout information sheets for prospecting exhibition managers
  • arranging operators to assist me at the show, somewhat easier with Canute Road Quay (in this case just the the one, in in the form of  friend and fellow modeller Simon Paley), than the larger number required for Fisherton Sarum!
  • overnight bag, if required, but not in the case of Railex as it is only 20 minutes from home

The revised fiddle yard arrangement the split cassettes feed arm can be seen

I have also made a small change to the way the cassettes in the off scene fiddle yard (a grand title for what is really just a shelf…) are handled and the electric feed provided. This is to make it easier to connect the cassette as previously I had two phosphor bronze spring clips fixed to the base which both provided the power feed to the aluminium section on each side and also ensured correct  alignment with the exit road. This arrangement also meant that the cassettes had to be aligned and slid in from the left hand end which was not all that practical due to the overrun protection at that side of the yard.

A closer view of the power feed arm and spring clip

I have now changed the nearest power feed and cassette alignment clip to be on a small lifting arm made from a suitable shaped piece of wood, complete with a nice little brass drawer handle. This enables the spring clip to be moved upwards and out of the way of the side of the cassette.
This arrangement now gives two advantages: firstly the cassettes can slid in and aligned easier from the front operating position; and secondly means that even with cassette in position the arm can be lifted isolating the cassette, where previously the cassette was live when the layout feed it adjoins to was live.

The feed arm in the up position

The cassettes I am using on Canute Road Quay, as I have mentioned before on this blog, are the 12″ loco cassettes from Fisherton Sarum and the some of these are made up on one side with two 6″ lengths of aluminium angle which I bridge electronically with a bulldog type clip and this allows for further isolation of a tank locomotive at the far end of the cassette.

Further to my previous post here about visitors to the quay  I have making some changes and or finishing touches to a couple of the locos in my fleet which may make and appearance the weekend, both are examples of the latest releases from Hatton’s in the shape of their delightful ex SECR P class 0-6-0t,  see my review here, and also their 14″ Andrew Barclay

A Hatton’s P Class now detailed and weathered

The P Class No 1558 already suiting my 1946 to 1949 modelling period being in post war SR black with ‘Sunshine’ style lettering has had crew fitted (in case the excellent ModelU 3D printed examples produced by Hatton’s specifically to fit the P Class), real coal added to the bunker and has been weathered.

The modified and weathered Hatton’s Andrew Barclay

My Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t has now been modified by replacing the existing buffers with wooden dumb buffers. The original standard buffers simply pull out and then the area of the bufferbeam filled flat to remove the rivet head detail. The wooden dumb buffers have been fashioned from rectangular plastic rod and suitably painted.

A further view of the Andrew Barclay

I have removed the original WTT branding in my usual way by rubbing with a cotton bud loaded with enamel thinners. As coal bunker space is pretty non-existent on these locomotives, having seen it photographs of the real thing added a couple of sacks of spare coal on just inside the cab and the other balanced on the running plate.  She has then been weathered to represent a pretty unkempt condition of such locomotives that were used on some of the other lines and private wharfs that existed in and around Southampton  area especially along the River Itchen. Like the P Class crew has been added using the ModelU 3D printed examples produced by Hatton’s.

If you are planning to visit Railex please make sure you come and say hello. I am stand 61, towards the right hand back corner (as you come into the hall)

 

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