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Posts Tagged ‘National Railway Museum’

Rails Limited in partnership with Dapol and the National Railway Museum announced at this weekends London Festival of Railway Modelling that they will produce the LBSC Terrier and all its subsequent variants in OO Gauge.

With all the experience Dapol has gained from making the award winning O Gauge version of the A1 / A1X Terrier it is fully anticipated that this project will progress very quickly. Decorated samples are expected to be available Autumn 2018.

Initially six livery versions will be available in DCC ready, DCC and DCC Sound fitted:

  • A1X No. 32655 in BR lined black with early crest
  • A1 No. 82 Boxhill in LBSC Stroudley improved engine green.
  • A1 Bodiam in KESR Blue
  • A1X No. 751 in SECR lined green
  • A1X No. 2644 in Southern post 1931 lines Olive Green
  • A1X No. 32661 in BR lined black with late crest

The tooling will allow eventually for most variations of the A1, A1X and IOW variants of the locomotive to be produced, including two cab/bunker types, two smokebox/boilers. Wooden and metal brake rigging where appropriate.

The announced specification includes:

  • Diecast chassis and running plate
  • Detailed plastic moulded body
  • Many separately fitted parts
  • Diecast wheels with sprung centre driving wheels to give compensation providing all wheel electrical pick up and better traction
  • DCC and sound Ready with easy access through a removable body which exposes a NEXT-18 socket
  • DCC and DCC Sound Fitted variants using Dapol’s own sound recording of 32678 on the Kent and East Sussex Railway
  • Powerful 5 pole skew wound motor
  • Factory sound fitted locomotives will feature RealDrive braking control

Pricing has been announced as being £110.00 each (DCC Ready), DCC Fitted Versions £140 / DCC Sound Versions £239 with pre ordering being recommended and secured with a £30 deposit.

These models will superceed the now much long in the tooth and slightly hybrid Dapol / Hornby Model. Full details can be found on the Rails website here

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Last year I posted about Armchair Ready-To-Run designers being an extension of the  term “armchair modeller” that has been used in the hobby referring to those who are vocal in criticism and comment but are sat in their comfy chairs tapping away on their keyboards without actually the processes involved in various aspects of the hobby. That particular post focused on the design side of things and why just because one model has been produced it should mean that a further slightly different model can or should also be produced.

The NRM Ivatt C1 Atlantic

The NRM Ivatt C1 Atlantic (picture courtesy and copyright NRM)

The announcement today by the National Railway Museum working with Bachmann of the exclusive model of the ex Great Northern Railways Ivatt C1 4-4-2 Atlantic locomotive has prompted this further ‘Armchair’ post.
Some say… that such a model was inevitable as Bachmann had already announced the ex LBSC Marsh H2 Class Atlantic.

ex LBSC H2 Class Atlantic  (picture courtesy of Bachmann)

ex LBSC H2 Class Atlantic (picture courtesy of Bachmann)

It is true that the  Marsh H2 Class and its predecessor the  H1 class can be directly traced back to the Ivatt C1 Atlantic owing to the fact Marsh had previously worked with Ivatt on the C1 class whilst he worked for the GNR and that the boiler and a proportion of the chassis design is the same.

In model terms though such lineage does not necessary mean savings in design, tooling, or production costs. As I mentioned in my previsious armchair post a common boiler does not help with tooling costs as often it is combined with different cabs, fitting,  running plates or other differing details. In the case of the two Atlantic models, and I discussed this with Bachmann staff a couple of weeks ago,  in reality only approximately 70% of only the chassis components are actually common. The loco body, tender and trailing truck are all different and therefor unique tooling. Therefore it is only a small proportion of time that can be potentially saved at the design stage,  as such as design work carried over for those small number of common components (remember its  approx 70% of the chassis only that is common) that can be simply copied.

Even with these limited number of common parts the two models are likely to be completely separately tooled. This is due to other reasons which a lot of people do not consider such as: the fact that if part of the tooling is used for more than model it creates double the wear on certain tools compared to the rest, the logistical issues of either stock holding between production runs or trying to manage production slots of both models at the same time.
This logistical challenge is hard enough for Bachmann whom unlike Hornby only have production at one factory. Hornby have different models being made at a number of  factories which is another reason why they would not usually share any aspect of tolling or components between models / factories as other wise it would be a logistical, transport and stock holding nightmare, in addition to the issue of uneven tooling wear.

I hope this post gives further food for thought into the issues that have to be considered in the design, tooling  and production of models for the Ready-To-Run market.

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Following on from my post Schools class 925 ‘Cheltenham Steams again I am please to report that The National Railway Museums SR Maunsell designed 4-4-0 Schools class No. 925 ‘Cheltenham’ has now emerged into the sunshine at Eastleigh Works fully painted in Bulleid post war malachite livery. A picture of her can be found here on the Mid Hants Railway website.

She will shortly be heading off to the  NRM’s Railfest event at York next month before entering service on the Mid Hants Railway.

Congratulations to all involved at  The National Railway Museum, Mid Hants Railway and Eastleigh Works,  in her overhaul she certainly looks the part.

I can  now confirm, rather than just the previous hint I gave in my previous post on Cheltenham,  that the NRM’s N15 Class 4-6-0 No. 777  ’Sir Lamiel’ is being also repainted into malachite, the pair should look mighty fine together.

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The National Railway Museums SR Maunsell designed 4-4-0 Schools class No. 925 ‘Cheltenham’ is nearing the final stages of its overhaul by a team from the Mid Hants Railway talking place at one of the Southern Railways spiritual homes Eastleigh Works.  She steamed and moved under her own power again earlier this week.

Once final painting and fettling takes place this coming week she will be heading off to the  NRM’s Railfest event at York in June before entering service on the Mid Hants Railway.

It’s great to one of Maunsell’s finest heading back to full operational service, hopefully later this year should also see Maunsell Locomotive Society’s S15 4-6-0 No, 847 and Q class 0-6-0 No. 541 both undergoing overhaul on the Bluebell Railway also joining the ranks of Maunsell locomotives in steam. There is also a chance that the NRM’s N15 Class 4-6-0 No. 777  ‘Sir Lamiel’ may also make an appearance in Post War Bulleid Livery, which hopefully will be a correct rendition unlike the mix of liveries currently being worn by their Lord Nelson 4-6-0  No. 850!

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