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This Armistice Day and Remembrance Sunday we mark 100 years since the end of the ‘Great War’, unfortunately not the war to end all wars, and although this post is mainly written to commemorate this especially poignant anniversary it is also dedicated to all Railway companies across the country and indeed the world that lost many staff; not only those drafted into the military services, but also those lost whom continued their duties on the railways keeping the networks up and running, we should honour and remember them all.

If you so wish, wear your poppy with pride today,pause respectfully for two minutes at 11 am , remembering all those, both service and civilian personnel whom have given their lives for the freedom that we all enjoy today, and should you feel so inclined, support the sterling work of the Royal British Legion.

When You Go Home,
Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow,
We Gave Our Today

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

Inscribed on James Scott’s Victory Arch, at Waterloo station: “Dedicated to the employees of the Company who fell in the war.” and the names of those London and South Western employees who gave their life are honoured within the arch.

Locomotive 333 was built originally by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway, designed by Billinton, as an L class 4-6-4 ‘Baltic’ tank. She was given the name Remembrance and became the companies War Memorial engine and carried a plaque with the inscription:

“In grateful remembrance of the 532 men of the L.B.& S.C.Rly. who gave their lives for their country, 1914-1919″

In 1934, under the auspices of Maunsell they were rebuilt as Class N15x (an appropriate Brighton-style suffix) 4-6-0s, and fitted with standard Urie LSWR tenders along with smoke deflectors. Now number 2333 ‘Remembrance’ retained its name, plaque and status within the Southern Railway.

And just to end this post, as written by Paul Hunter – the poppy is more than a one time of a year symbol:, 

I am not a badge of honour, I am not a racist smear,
I am not a fashion statement, to be worn but once a year,
I am not glorification of conflict or of war.
I am not a paper ornament a token,
I am more.

I am a loving memory, Of a father or a son,
a permanent reminder of each and every one. 
I’m paper or enamel, I’m old or shining new,
I’m a way of saying thank you, To every one of you.

I am a simple poppy, a reminder to you all,
That courage faith and honour,
will stand where heroes of all kinds fall.

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The Southern Railway purchased 14 (plus one extra for spares) of these powerful, short wheel based locomotives from the United States Army Transportation Corps in 1946 for use within Southampton Docks to replace the ageing ex LSWR B4 0-4-0t.  They were built to US Army specification T1531, all bar one of the 14 were built by Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania; whist one, that became SR No.61 was built by H K Porter & Co Pittsburgh.

USA Tank No. 4326 in United States Army Transportation Corps livery and condition,  note: lack of side cab windows, porthole rear cab windows and coal bunker with coal rails. I use this Model Rail version as the basis of my No.71 below.

They were modified at at Eastleigh works to suit Southern Railway use including: adding steam heating, vacuum ejectors, sliding cab side windows, square instead of circular front and rear cab windows (which ironically gave them more of an American look than British but improved visibility from the cab), Ross ‘pop’ type safety valves, a whistle, additional lamp irons and new cylinder drain cocks.

Early condition No. 72 still with original cab front and rear windows and bunker but cab side windows fitted and weathered

Once the locomotives started to enter traffic, large roof-top ventilators were fitted, British regulators to replace the US-style pull-out one, extended coal bunkers increasing capacity from 26cwt to 30cwt, separate steam and vacuum brake controls and wooden tip-up seats.

No. 68 shows off the extended rear bunker, roiff ventilator and square rear cab windows

It should be noted that engines entered service before all these modifications were totally completed and some locomotives did not receive all the modifications into early British Railways days, the last being October 1948..

Later in British Railways days they were fitted additional hand rails and an additional flat fold down platform beneath the front of the smokebox that folded down over the buffers to assist staff cleaning out the smokbox.

A view of No. 68 suitably weathered on Canute Road Quay

Post 1957 thet were also fitted with wireless two way cab radios, a whip aerial on the drivers side cab sheet and a steam driven turbine generator to power them. These steam generators were in fact second hand having been previously fitted to the various T9 and L11 class locomotives that were fitted with them when fitted for oil-firing in 1947/8.

No. 30064 in later BR livery and condition showing revised handrails and fold down front platform

Six of the class were later transferred to departmental stock and could be found at locations such Guildford shed and Meldon Quarry. They were eventually replaced at Southampton by the Class 07 diesel shunters. Withdrawal of the class took place between 1964 and 1967. Foiur survive into preservation, along with one similar ex USATC locomotive from Yugoslavia that was never in SR /BR(s) service.

Another view of No. 68 on Canute Road Quay

Those pictured on this post are based on the excellent ready to run model commissioned by Model Rail Magazine by Bachmann. Dapol have produced the ex LSWR B4 0-4-0t that the USA tanks replaced and Heljan have now also produced the 07 Class diesels that displaced the USA from Southampton docks. All of which are very suitable for my Canute Road Quay layout. See my exhibition diary page here to see where Canute Road Quay can be seen next.

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It has been a busy period recent both in the arrival of some new ready to run models such as the Hatton’s ex SECR P class 0-6-0t,  see my review here, and also their 14″ Andrew Barclay along with some time spent applying some finishing decals prior to weathering of a couple of kit built models namely the ex LBSC D1  0-4-2t and ex SECR S Class 0-6-0st. All these models still require a little work, including in some cases repainting and numbering and also weathering. Some of you may have seen some of these pictures before on my twitter feed. 

SECR P Class 754 in WW1 grey livery

With the arrival of the Hatton’s P class I took the opportunity to temporarily move the location of Canute Road Quay further South east and backdate to earlier than my usual 1946-49 modelling period, including some of my earlier style wagons that do not usually get an outing. It is one of the advantages of having such a layout that has no real identifiable items to identify the actual time period.

ex SECR P Class 1555

Eventually to suit my preferred time period: No. 754 will be repainted and numbered to become  her later identity of No. 1557 in SR post war black livery, being one of the first two built with the slightly higher cab; whilst No. 1555 will be renumbered and lettered as No. 31555 with full ‘British Railways’ Sunshine lettering to represent her condition in early 1948.

ex LBSC D1 Class No. 2357

The ex LBSC D1 0-4-2t is built from a South Eastern Fincast white metal kit. In fact a couple of examples of the class, including No. 2286 are know to have been used at Southampton docks for a while in mid 1930s up to WW2 so I am not actually stretching history too far by running my model of no. 2357 on Canute Road Quay albeit in a slightly later post war-time period, although she was technically allocated to Ashford at the time so she is obviously on loan.

Andrew Barclay 14″ before being modified with wooden dumb buffers and weathered

The Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t will be modified to replace the existing buffers with wooden dumb buffers, have the WTT branding stripped off and suitably weathered to represent the condition of such locomotives that were used on some of the other lines and private wharfs that existed in and around Southampton  area especially along the River Itchen.
I also have a Hornby Peckett on order, that I will likewise modify with wooden dumb buffers to give some further variety to locomotives at Canute Road Quay and differ from the standard RTR versions. I will post details of this conversion in due course.

ex SECR S Class No. 1685

The ex SECR S Class 0-6-0 saddle tank No. 1685 is also built from South Eastern Fincast white metal kit. The S Class was in fact only one locomotive due to a requirement for a heavy shunter at Richborough Port during WW1 and so was converted from a C Class 0-6-0 tender locomotive, after the war she was transferred to Bricklayers Arms until withdrawal in 1951. Like the ex LBSC D1 she must be on load to Canute Road Quay.

ex LSWR B4 Class No. 100

With Canute Road Quay’s appearance looming at the excellent Railex exhibition organised by friends at the Princes Risborough and District MRC, being held at Stoke Mandeville Stadium, Stadium Approach, Aylesbury, Bucks, HP21 9PP on the 26th and 27th May 

USA Tank No. 70

I have started to return Canute Road Quay to its intended Southampton-ish location and the ex LSWR B4 0-4-0 and USA 0-6-0 tanks have returned along with suitable rolling stock and uncouplers etc all wheel cleaned, tried and tested in readiness for what I know will be an enjoyable weekend playing trains, shunting and talking.

USA Tank No.68

If you are planning to visit Railex please make sure you come and say hello. I am stand 61, towards the right hand back corner (as you come into the hall) and will ably assisted by friend and fellow modeller Simon Paley for the weekend, he being the much younger looking operator!

I hope this post has been of interest and as stated above it does show the advantages of having a layout that is not an actual real location but endeavours to capture a flavour and also is not easily identifiable to a specific time period. I also intend to occasionally run in a later 1960s period with a few diesel shunters so more on this in a future post.

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The small manufacturer of Ready To Run locomotive 00 Works announced back in May 2017 their intention to produce a batch of ex LSWR Drummond 4-4-0 D15s  A number of the versions have now arrived from 00 Works, although as with many of their releases I have not personally ordered one myself (I already have a couple of kit built examples,  that can be seen here in my Talking Stock #17 post along with some further details on the prototype) I am indebted to friend and fellow Southern modeller Tony Teague for once again providing his photographs and comments below.

This release follows on from a number of Southern locomotive produced by the ’00’ Works in the past such as: N15, 700, C, E4, I3 and 0415 Adams Radial classes (although of course some of these have now all been subsequently been announced or produced by the major manufacturers). The level of detail of these models has steadily improved over time, although is still not as high as we see from the likes of Hornby and Bachmann, or from if built carefully from kits. No other ready to run D15 exists although kits have been available in the past  from BEC and PDK

No. 463 The 00 Works ex LSWR D15 class
Tony advised: Having just taken delivery of the new 00 Works D15 loco in Southern olive green, I am pleased to say that it was extremely well packed, has a lot of weight above the driving wheels and captures the essence of Drummond’s original locomotive. As with 00 Works’ previous Southern loco (the I3 tank) the model has some interior cab detail, and wire handrails, whilst the lined olive livery is very well executed, however, this is a “limited run” RTR loco and at £280 it is not cheap; on this basis there are a number of niggles, some of which could perhaps have easily been resolved. 

A head of view by comparison with OO Works D15 left and kit built PDK version right
The moulded coal in the bunker does not look good and is not easily removable, so it will need some real coal to cover it; if real coal is not supplied, then my personal preference would be for the tender to be modelled empty. A tension lock coupling was fitted to the front of the loco and this was easily removed, although no alternative was supplied. Although the coupling rods are blackened, the wheel rims are not and look too shiny, there is no rivet detail around the boiler (which is prominent on the prototype), and although the top and bottom lamp irons are fitted, the two central ones (which should be on either side of the smoke box) are not represented; finally, brake hangars and blocks are modelled but there is no brake rigging.
Tony continued; On my particular model, the fixed loco to tender coupling was holding the front tender wheels off the track – which was easily adjusted, whilst the red cabside oval plates did not have the loco number within them. 

The understaide of the 00 Works D15
The model is fitted with a coreless motor which is new for 00 Works, and whilst it appears powerful it seems noisier than other recent release from the mainstream manufacturers, however, my biggest problem arose from the way in which the loco is wired. It has pickups on one side of the loco and on the opposite side of the tender only – so of 14 available wheels (including the front bogie) the loco only picks up from 5 –  a single wire connects the loco and tender (see picture). I spoke to Roderick Bruce at 00 Works and he described the way in which the loco was wired as “the American standard”; he also pointed out that his previous tender locos have been wired the same way.

Tony’s PDK kit built version to allow a comparison

I have since remedied this by fitting additional pick-ups to the opposite side of the loco, however, the conversation did cause me to look at my other 00 Works locos and perhaps unsurprisingly, I had noted 3 of them as being “poor runners” that I had yet to attend to. I have since fitted additional pick-ups to each and this has resolved all of the running issues, however, this does make me wonder whether it is reasonable these days to provide so few pick-ups – particularly on a 4-4-0 loco!
Once the wiring was remedied, I put the loco onto a test train consisting of 8 x Hornby Pullmans and it was able to pull away on the flat – albeit with some wheel-slip – and make good speed; once run in it may perhaps do better.

Overall I am now happy with the loco, but it needed some tweaking to get to this point. Given that there is no mainstream RTR model of the D15 available, the 00 Works model remains a good choice, because the kit-built option will cost at least double – unless you are going to build the kit yourself. Nevertheless I think it would be fair to say that there is “room for improvement”!

From my own view of the images Tony supplied and those I have seen elsewhere an area that has slightly let down the finish of the 00 Works releases in the past has been the highly visible carrier film to decals especially the numbers, although Tony’s example in SR Olive Greens looks OK I have seen that this issue still exists on their numbered releases, especially the lined BR versions.

Despite these small issues the model from 00 Works fills a niche gap in the RTR market and a with little additional detail makes a fine model. Thanks again for Tony for his pictures and comments on this model.

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Today is the funeral, of London South Western Railway historian and modelling stalwart, octogenarian Henry Bousher who sadly passed away on 8th July after a battle with ill health.  This post is by way of a mark of respect to Henry, my condolences to his family and fellow friends and by a small way a celebration of his many full years of life.

Henry was a member of the Epsom and Ewell Model Railway Club in excess of 50 years, an active and long term member of the South Western Circle and and also The Model Railway Club. His knowledge of and enthusiasm for the London and Southern Western Railway (LSWR) was extensive and infectious, along with a great humour coupled to his joy at seeing pictures of or an accurately modelled rake of Salmon and Chocolate LSWR coaching stock (especially with the coach roofs being white).  He will be sorely missed as will be his willingness to assist, teach and impart his knowledge to others.

A view of the representation of Waterloo station on the Southwalk Bridge layout

He was actively involved, even when his health was not so great, in the wonderful LSWR 4mm scale P4 gauge layout Southwalk Bridge, having been instrumental in its conception, research, construction and operation. His legacy of his involvement will happily continue for many years to come.

An M7 brings empty stock into the station under the impressive signal cabin and gantry

Southwalk Bridge, being built by the Southampton Area group of the Scalefour Socity under the helm of Micheal Day, is a piece of LSWR splendour depicting the approaches to a seven platform representation of the LSWR terminus at Waterloo, set in 1912.  It runs to a sequence depicting a typical range of trains and movements of the time,  via a fully interlocked signalling system and a number of controlling driving positions over its 45 foot length.

An O2 arrives, the signalling levers for the interlocked operation can be seen in the background

I have had the pleasure of visiting and operating the layout on a couple of occasions now, and the layout will no doubt form the basis of more detailed future post. I will never forget my last visit, earlier this year, where I was chaperoned / guided / instructed at one of the controller locations, the Up Main, by Henry for the day. I was able to listen to, learn from and enjoy his humour and knowledge for a prolonged period, it was truly a fabulous day and felt very much an honour and fun to be in his company.

Rest In Peace Henry!

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The ’00’ Works have produced a number of small batches of hand built Ready to Run locomotives including a variety of Southern classes, including most recently an ex London Brighton and South Coast Railway Marsh I3 4-4-2 Tanks. They also produced, before Hornby, a brass Devon Belle Observation car which graces Fisherton Sarum. The ’00’works have announced that they are to produce three  versions of the ex London and South Western Drummond D14 4-4-0 express passenger locomotives.

The Image of the CAD drawing released by the 00 Works for their ex LSWR D15 4-4-0

Initially three versions are being produced, due for production this year, with pre-orders available to be taken via their website:

  • BR Black Lined No 30465 (Small early crest with stove-pipe chimney)
  • SR Black Bulleid Black Sunshine lettering No 466 (Original chimney, no Snifting valves)
  • SR Olive Lined No 463 (Original chimney with Snifting valves) 

The 00 Works advise that the The D-15 will have an all Metal cast body and fitted with a Coreless motor. The D-15 will also come fitted with slimline Bachmann/Hornby type couplings which can be unscrewed to replace if required.

My first D15 No. 466 built from a BEC Kit

As I explained in my Talking Stock#17 Post here Drummond was responsible for the introduction of 18 locomotive types including from the diminutive C14 class, 700’s, M7’s, a number of 4-4-0 classes including of course the renown T9 ‘Greyhounds’ class a small number of 4-6-0’s classes such as the T14’s and also a couple of railcars too. Over ten of these classes were long lived and survived well into British Railways ownership with the last of the D15 class not being withdrawn until 1956.

Also built from a BEC kit is my No. 467 in cleaner condition than 466

The D15’s were the final 10 Drummond 4-4-0’s introduced and were a version of the L12 class but with a longer boiler and firebox, with an overall 18″ longer wheelbase than the T9. The D15s performed exceptionally well and were put to work on the Bournemouth line where, apparently, many drivers preferred them to the less successful Drummond 4-6-0’s designs. They latterly saw extensive use on the Portsmouth line.

Past Southern locomotive produced by the ’00’ Works, some of which have since been produced or announced by the major manufacturers, has in addition to the I3 mentioned above, included: N15, 700, C, H,  E4 and Adams Radial classes. The level of detail of these models has steadily improved over time, although is still not as high as we seem from the likes of Hornby or Bachmann, they have in the past filled gaps in the market and they should be applauded for taking on another LSWR / Southern prototype.

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Although not strictly model news this latest book from the excellent Irwell Press stable will provide an invaluable resource for LSWR, Southern or Southern region modellers alike. ‘Southern Nouveau: An essay in concrete’ was originally published as a small paperback comprising of only 56 pages, 30 years ago in 1987 by Chris Hawkins and George Reeve via Wild Swan Publications,  and has long since been out of print, with some copies fetching silly amounts of money on well known auction sites.

The latest, hot off the press (last weekend in fact) publication from my good friends at the Irwell Press,  is “SOUTHERN NOUVEAU – And the Lineside.” a very much expanded tome at 400 pages and in hardback format  It covers much more of the story of the Exmouth Junction Concrete Works, from its early beginnings, the development of its products and is somewhat expanded, from the original publication, to cover many more lineside items as the title implies.
It includes pretty much all the Concrete items, from entire huts and footbridges, to humble posts in every conceivable size and configuration, that poured out of the special concrete works at Exmouth Junction and slowly caused the ‘look’ of the Southern to change. And that was before the celebrated Southern Art Deco buildings began to appear, which are also included in this publication.
This a comprehensive record and account of those years, of developments which rippled out across the wider BR network until even the 1970s. It uses a large number of photographs and drawings, along with detailed descriptions, of almost every facet of the Southerns lineside items as they evolved well into BR days, even including details of the official painting specification for the myriad of items that are included, ranging from Posts, Platforms, Name / running boards, Bridges, Huts, Stores, Stations, Engine Sheds and Signal Boxes.

I am pretty confident that there is no other single source in which almost the entire spectrum of lineside items of the Southern Railway / Region can be found and therefore it will prove to be a most valuable resource, so I wholeheartedly  recommend it to any Southern / Southern Region historian or modeller . I have even been able to provide a small contribution within the weighty book, see if you can spot it…

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