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Posts Tagged ‘London Brighton and South Coast Railway’

Marking the occasion will be somewhat different this year due to obvious circumstances. If you so wish, wear a poppy with pride today, but please pause respectfully for two minutes at 11 am this Remembrance Sunday and for Armistice Day on Wednesday remembering all those, both service and civilian personnel whom have given their lives for the freedom that we all enjoy today, and should you feel so inclined, especially in these times, support the sterling work of the Royal British Legion.

Marking 102 years since the end of the ‘Great War’, unfortunately not the war to end all wars, and although this post is mainly written to commemorate this especially poignant anniversary it is also dedicated to all Railway companies across the country and indeed the world that lost many staff; not only those drafted into the military services, but also those lost whom continued their duties on the railways keeping the networks up and running, we should honour and remember them all.

When You Go Home,
Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow,
We Gave Our Today

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

Locomotive 333 was built originally by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway, designed by Billinton, as an L class 4-6-4 ‘Baltic’ tank. She was given the name Remembrance and became the companies War Memorial engine and carried a plaque with the inscription:

“In grateful remembrance of the 532 men of the L.B.& S.C.Rly. who gave their lives for their country, 1914-1919″

In 1934, under the auspices of Maunsell they were rebuilt as Class N15x (an appropriate Brighton-style suffix) 4-6-0s, and fitted with standard Urie LSWR tenders along with smoke deflectors. Now number 2333 ‘Remembrance’ retained its name, plaque and status within the Southern Railway.

This year also marks 100 years since the body of the British Unknown Warrior arrived at London Victoria station after being transported by ship and train from the fields of France, on 10th November 1020, and lay overnight at Platform 8 before internment at Westminster Abbey the following day on  Armistice Day.

 

Inscribed on James Scott’s Victory Arch, at Waterloo station: “Dedicated to the employees of the Company who fell in the war.” and the names of those London and South Western employees who gave their life are honoured within the arch.

And just to end this post, as written by Paul Hunter – the poppy is more than a one time of a year symbol:, 

I am not a badge of honour, I am not a racist smear,
I am not a fashion statement, to be worn but once a year,
I am not glorification of conflict or of war.
I am not a paper ornament a token,
I am more.

I am a loving memory, Of a father or a son,
a permanent reminder of each and every one. 
I’m paper or enamel, I’m old or shining new,
I’m a way of saying thank you, To every one of you.

I am a simple poppy, a reminder to you all,
That courage faith and honour,
will stand where heroes of all kinds fall.

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The first five members of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSC) E2 class 0-6-0 tanks were introduced by L Billington in June 1913.  In service they were found to be powerful but slightly lacking in water and therefore a further batch of 5 were ordered, although delayed by the war, and built between June 1915 and October 1916 with extended side tanks, These extended tanks  increased water capacity from 1,090 to 1,256 gallons.
They were used on shunting and short distance goods trips, their small capacity coal bunkers made them unsuitable for longer trips. They were also used on empty stock workings at Victoria and London Bridge.

E2 No. 2104 shunts at the Quay

Work in progress front 3/4 view

Work in Progress rear 3/4 view

The bulk of the E2 can be seen in comparison with the B4 class. The body is yet to be lowered on the chassis slightly.

The later style chassis with added guard irons and sandboxes. The front fixing lugs are yet to be filed smaller to lower the body (The rear lug is likewise reduced)

The front 3/4 view RH side

the RH Side 3/4 view, she awaits some weathering now

Further shunting at the Quay

Following the onset of electrification a number were used as shunters at Southampton Docks and despite their 16ft wheelbase restricting their use in some areas of the docks they stayed working the docks until 1962 when the Class 07 diesels arrived.
Withdrawal of took place between 1961 and 1963.

The Hornby model of the E2 0-6-0 first appeared in 1979 and following 4 versions, LBSC Umber (2 versions) , SR lined Black and SR olive green, production ceased in 1984.   After which the tooling was altered used for the production of some other blue model… dam I wasn’t going to mention that…

Many years ago in my yoof I simply repainted into SR ‘Sunshine’ black, now with Canute Road Quay being an ideal setting for an E2 I decided to dig the E2 out again and give her a quick win makeover, so finescale modellers look away now…

The original chassis was the standard at the time Hornby generic 0-6-0 X04 motor fitted chassis. As this is a quick win project I have decided to not at this stage built a new chassis but simply swap it for the later style of Hornby 0-6-0 generic chassis with its closed frames and smaller motor and slightly greater level of detail. This later chassis is a direct replacement and also gives better running.
To this chassis I have added front sandboxes, made from plastic rectangular section and filed to shape with wire sand pipes, and added front and rear guard irons from plasticard.

The body itself generally matches the correct dimensions for the E2 which was certainly one of the larger 0-6-0 tanks. I have added new brass buffers, pipework, clack valves and lamp irons from various bits and bobs kicking around from the spares / scrap box.
In keeping with the Brighton Style, dating from when the water in the tanks was pre heated, the tank sides were clad and the fixing bolts for the cladding were a visible feature and the E2 was no different. To represent these visible fixings I drilled then glued in 0.45mm wire before cutting the wire almost flush with the tankside.
Just underneath the running plate I have added the long horizontal air tanks on each side, made from plastic rod and some of the piping from brass wire.

The E2 is a large tank when compared to other tanks such as the B4 class, however the body as new does sit slightly too high on the chassis, and this is simply remedied by filing the underside of the front two fixing lugs and also the underside of the single rear sprung lug.

After a dusting with primer from a Halfords aerosol can she received a coat of Halfords Satin Black again from a rattle can before the smokebox and cab roof were brush painted matt black and the bufferbeam of course in red. Her identity as 2104 was added using HMRS Pressfix transfers to complete the look.

I admit she would benefit from a proper finescale chassis, but as a quick win project I think it fits the bill and will extend the life of the Hornby model seeing occasional use on canute Road Quay. A nice 3D print of the E2 with the extended tanks is available and so this might form the basis of a future project…

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The William Stroudley designed A1 / A1x class first introduced by the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSC) in 1872 and eventually the class comprised of 50 locomotives. Most were withdrawn in the very 1900s, however 21 gained a new lease of life and were fitted with new boilers and other modifications between 1912 and 1920 and became designated the A1X class. A few members of the original A1 class were sold by the LBSC to other railway companies, including the SECR, LSWR and Kent & East Sussex Railway and Isle of Wight Central Railway, and survived in A1 form, although even these were subject to many other modifications throughout their lifetime. Many of the class in various guises and conditions have survived into preservation.

32655 at Canute Road Quay. The firebox glow / flicker can be seen.

It is the many modifications, including boilers, smokeboxes, boiler fittings, air and or vacuum braking, wooden and metal brakes and rigging, a multitude of coal bunker sizes and shapes, coal rails, sandboxes and lamp iron positions to name a few, that provides such a challenge for any manufacturer.

The front 3/4 view

It should also be noted that as with ‘Brighton’ Tradition the side tanks were clad, which stood slight proud of the actual tanks, hence the visible recess in the tank top and the visible bolts on the outside cladding (that varied in number at different times).

The rear 3/4 view including the coal rails

The first 00 R-T-R Terrier was produced by Dapol in 1989, it was something of a compromise both dimensionally and also and hybrid of A1 and A1X details. One of the most obvious being both above and below footplate sand boxes.

The LH side

Dapol sold the tooling, along with others, to Hornby in 1996 and it has been as staple in their range since 1998, although latterly in the their ‘Railroad’ range. Dapol have since produced R-T-R version in both N and 0 gauges since.

Rails of Sheffield announced in March 2018 that they were working in partnership with Dapol to produce a new version that would include tooling to allow eventually for most variations of the A1, A1X and IOW variants of the locomotive to be produced, including two cab/bunker types, two smokebox/boilers. Wooden and metal brake rigging where appropriate.

Hornby then announced in January 2019 that they were including a brand tooling version of the Terrier in its own 2019 range. This is believed by many to have been a rushed ‘spoiler’ by Hornby and also £30 cheaper. Hornby had considered and dropped the idea of retooling before, however I can advise my understanding, that, this new tooling was already being worked on, although not by the actual Hornby team direct, but via another associated brand. Under the new Hornby management team, it was decided to move it in to the Hornby brand instead. This new Hornby version first reached the retailers back in April 2019, showing just how far advanced the development of the model was.

The front face, smokebox number plate too high and printed shed code plate

This post is look at the latest version from Rails of Sheffield and although not intending to be a direct comparison between the two manufacturers but in some cases, it is difficult not to make mention of both versions. Although I only have the one version myself so far, as illustrated, some of my comments are based on viewing other examples.

The Rails of Sheffield / Dapol version features: a die cast chassis and running plate along with plastic wheel centres (despite die cast being within the original advertised specification), the centre axle being sprung and pick-ups on each axle via fine wipers on the rear of each wheel, a 5 pole screw wound motor, a Next-18 DCC socket and also a firebox glow ./ flicker is included (very obvious, possibly too bright, even on DC) . Etched components are used for items such as the wing plates on the A1 version and for the different coal rails.

I will generally let the photographs speak for themselves however I make the following observations and comments. The model when checked against my available drawings matches all the key dimensions correctly (unlike the Hornby model that is approx. 1mm short along the length of the footplate). My model arrived missing its top smokebox lamp iron and there was no evidence of it being in the box, however she ran smoothly straight out of the box. The livery application is crisp, but perhaps not quite as well applied as the Hornby standard.

The chassis is well detailed with the correct style brakes and rods depending on the version, separate sand pipes are fitted, and the guard irons are a much better representation than the first batch of the new Hornby models (which is area I believe they have now retooled). A representation of the top of inside valve gear is nicely represented between the frames. The wheels are moulded with the correct spoke profile and the tyres chemically blackened which adds nicely to the look.
NEM coupling pockets are mounted on a sprung arm similar to the Dapol B4, I feel this possibly gives slightly to much side to side travel.

A close up of the cab interior and those coal rails

The inside of the cab features a back head with gauges that have printed dials, but none of the other items or pipework are painted. This appears to be a common single moulding across all versions, based on the earlier A1 cab, and does not include vacuum brake controls that should be present on my version. Hornby also appears to utilise a single backhead moulding but is based on the later A1X cab fittings. The The Rails of Sheffield / Dapol model is also fitted with a working firebox glow / flicker which is very effective (although possibly too bright) even on DC control.

A close up of the front and correct relationship between the buffer stocks and the running plate

The spectacle windows are nicely individually glazed (rather than and much better than a single glazing piece across both spectacles), the rims are picked out in brass paint, although they would have been painted body colour in BR days. I am still not convinced that they are not inset slightly too close together when looked at straight on. The rear spectacles have finely moulded glazing bars on my example.

The front generally captures the face nicely, especially well represented are the way the buffer stocks are mounted to and within the running plate, that is a very visible feature of the Terriers.
The smoke box number plate whilst nicely moulded to stand proud of the smokebox door is fitted to high compared to all the pictures I have seen, also the shed code plate is simply printed with no relief. All models appear to have a common air pipe, that on my version should be a spiral wound vacuum pipe.

The cab rear join within the cab roof can be seen

The tank tops are correctly recessed (unlike the first batch of the new Hornby model, see retool comment above) and all boiler mounted pipe work and lubricators and safety valves are nice separately applied items.

Looking at the rear, this is possibly the most disappointing area of the model. To enable the variations in the cab rear such as centre joint seam plate and rivets etc. the rear of the cab is a separate moulding and for some reason, unlike any other model I have seen this protrudes through the cab roof, rather than be joined under the roof. This join is visible even on the black version, let alone those earlier liveries with a white roof. I do not believe any version of the cab rear includes the bunker coal hole and shovel plate and neither is any representation of a coal load included.

By comparison the Hornby version, note the A1X cab interior, single glazing piece for both spectacles, missing guard irons, and incorrect buffer stock mounting, but better positioned coal rails. The top lamp iron and spectacle guards slightly over scale.

Probably the most obvious compromise area are the coal rails, although etched they are positioned within the bunker, rather than flush with the bunker outside edges and leaving an obvious and incorrect lip. I also believe the finely etched open coals on other versions to also be inset too much and under size. The rear top lamp iron position is fitted in the correct A1 position, which is possibly partly why, but not wholly why, such a compromise on the coal rail was required for those so fitted. The transition curve between the cab rear and bunker seems to be too larger a radius, when compared to photographs and drawings.
The same comments from the front view regarding the buffer stocks and air / vacuum pipe also applies to those on the rear.

Another view at Canute Road Quay

Overall, the A1 / A1X Terriers are a very complex prototype due to the longevity, alterations and multitude of detail differences that present such a challenge to manufactures to get the most out their tooling options verses compromises that have to be made.
It is certainly not as easy some people think or might have thought to make a perfect R-T-R model to cover all prototype modifications and variations within the constraints of mass production tooling.
In my view the version from Rails of Sheffield / Dapol might not be the ‘perfect’ or ‘pedigree’ Terrier, but it has the slight edge over the current competing product; being generally dimensionally correct and overall slightly finer. This is despite the cab rear / roof join / coal rails that I will amend when I repaint into SR ‘Sunshine’ black livery.

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If you so wish, wear your poppy with pride today, pause respectfully for two minutes at 11 am this Remembrance Sunday and Armistice Day tomorrow remembering all those, both service and civilian personnel whom have given their lives for the freedom that we all enjoy today, and should you feel so inclined, support the sterling work of the Royal British Legion.

Marking 101 years since the end of the ‘Great War’, unfortunately not the war to end all wars, and although this post is mainly written to commemorate this especially poignant anniversary it is also dedicated to all Railway companies across the country and indeed the world that lost many staff; not only those drafted into the military services, but also those lost whom continued their duties on the railways keeping the networks up and running, we should honour and remember them all.

When You Go Home,
Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow,
We Gave Our Today

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

Locomotive 333 was built originally by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway, designed by Billinton, as an L class 4-6-4 ‘Baltic’ tank. She was given the name Remembrance and became the companies War Memorial engine and carried a plaque with the inscription:

“In grateful remembrance of the 532 men of the L.B.& S.C.Rly. who gave their lives for their country, 1914-1919″

In 1934, under the auspices of Maunsell they were rebuilt as Class N15x (an appropriate Brighton-style suffix) 4-6-0s, and fitted with standard Urie LSWR tenders along with smoke deflectors. Now number 2333 ‘Remembrance’ retained its name, plaque and status within the Southern Railway.

Inscribed on James Scott’s Victory Arch, at Waterloo station: “Dedicated to the employees of the Company who fell in the war.” and the names of those London and South Western employees who gave their life are honoured within the arch.

And just to end this post, as written by Paul Hunter – the poppy is more than a one time of a year symbol:, 

I am not a badge of honour, I am not a racist smear,
I am not a fashion statement, to be worn but once a year,
I am not glorification of conflict or of war.
I am not a paper ornament a token,
I am more.

I am a loving memory, Of a father or a son,
a permanent reminder of each and every one. 
I’m paper or enamel, I’m old or shining new,
I’m a way of saying thank you, To every one of you.

I am a simple poppy, a reminder to you all,
That courage faith and honour,
will stand where heroes of all kinds fall.

Read Full Post »

Last month on Saturday 8th June 2019, Bachmann Europe Plc visited the Bluebell Railway during its Atlantic House Open Weekend to present a cheque for £10,617.50 to the Bluebell Railway Atlantic Group.  This follows the release of the excellent Bachmann Branchline OO scale model of the H2 Class Atlantic locomotive in 2018, my review of the model can be read here.

Richard Proudman from Bachmann Europe presents the cheque to Atlantic
Project Chairman, Terry Cole (l) and Secretary, David Jones (r).

The donation was made in recognition of the assistance provided by the group during the development of the Branchline model. The model was first announced during the 2013 Bachmann Collectors Club Members Day which was held at the Bluebell Railway and during which club members were able to see the development of the full size locomotive for themselves.

Bachmann 31-920 No. 2421 ‘South Foreland’ in Maunsell lined Southern livery

In October 2000 the Bluebell Railway announced its intentions to build a new H2 Atlantic locomotive, based on No. 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ (the original ‘Beachy Head’ had been withdrawn in 1958), at which point it had already amassed several key components including a boiler (from a GNR Atlantic), a tender chassis (from a LBSCR B4) and tender wheelsets and axleboxes (from a LBSCR C2X). The project continues apace, and it is hoped that the locomotive will enter service on the Bluebell Railway during 2021. More information on the H2 Atlantic Project can be found here 

A video of the presentation can be watched here.

 

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Hornby have today added 14 new items to their range as a mid year range announcement. The full list of items can be found here. 

From a Southern perspective this includes a couple of new livery’s to their newly tooled ex LBSC A1/A1x 0-6-0t ‘Terrier’ range.

R3811 /R3811x (DCC fitted) LB&SCR A1 class ‘Terrier’ – Introduced by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway (LB&SCR) in 1876, No. 48 Leadenhall was allocated first to New Cross then in the mid 1880s the  locomotive was transferred to Eastbourne for the Hailsham and Lewes local services. before being transferred to Portsmouth in 1890, 48 Leadenhall worked the East Southsea and Hayling Island branch line services until August 1901.

R3812 / R3812x (DCC fitted) SR A1X Class ‘Terrier’ W10 ‘Cowes’ – Numbered as 69 and named Peckham, the Isle of Wight Central Railway (IWCR) took possession of the locomotive on 18 April 1900 and it retained this combination until 1925, two years after being taken into Southern Railway stock. Repainted into Maunsell Green and given the running number of W10, in October 1928 the locomotive received the name ‘Cowes’ which it retained until May 1936 when it was recalled to the mainland to be stored.

 

Delivery of these new versions is expected to be January 2020.

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This Armistice Day and Remembrance Sunday we mark 100 years since the end of the ‘Great War’, unfortunately not the war to end all wars, and although this post is mainly written to commemorate this especially poignant anniversary it is also dedicated to all Railway companies across the country and indeed the world that lost many staff; not only those drafted into the military services, but also those lost whom continued their duties on the railways keeping the networks up and running, we should honour and remember them all.

If you so wish, wear your poppy with pride today,pause respectfully for two minutes at 11 am , remembering all those, both service and civilian personnel whom have given their lives for the freedom that we all enjoy today, and should you feel so inclined, support the sterling work of the Royal British Legion.

When You Go Home,
Tell Them Of Us And Say, For Their Tomorrow,
We Gave Our Today

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

Inscribed on James Scott’s Victory Arch, at Waterloo station: “Dedicated to the employees of the Company who fell in the war.” and the names of those London and South Western employees who gave their life are honoured within the arch.

Locomotive 333 was built originally by the London Brighton and South Coast Railway, designed by Billinton, as an L class 4-6-4 ‘Baltic’ tank. She was given the name Remembrance and became the companies War Memorial engine and carried a plaque with the inscription:

“In grateful remembrance of the 532 men of the L.B.& S.C.Rly. who gave their lives for their country, 1914-1919″

In 1934, under the auspices of Maunsell they were rebuilt as Class N15x (an appropriate Brighton-style suffix) 4-6-0s, and fitted with standard Urie LSWR tenders along with smoke deflectors. Now number 2333 ‘Remembrance’ retained its name, plaque and status within the Southern Railway.

And just to end this post, as written by Paul Hunter – the poppy is more than a one time of a year symbol:, 

I am not a badge of honour, I am not a racist smear,
I am not a fashion statement, to be worn but once a year,
I am not glorification of conflict or of war.
I am not a paper ornament a token,
I am more.

I am a loving memory, Of a father or a son,
a permanent reminder of each and every one. 
I’m paper or enamel, I’m old or shining new,
I’m a way of saying thank you, To every one of you.

I am a simple poppy, a reminder to you all,
That courage faith and honour,
will stand where heroes of all kinds fall.

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Bachmann first announced the introduction of these ex London Brighton and South Coast Railway H2 Class 4-4-2 Locomotives back in August 2013. Although its taken a while have they captured the graceful looks of these lovely lovely Marsh / Billinton locomotives and overcome the challenges of such a wheel arrangement with tight clearances, certainly yes. This review could easily be summed up in three words “it’s very pretty”.

Bachmann 31-920 No. 2421 ‘South Foreland’ in Maunsell lined Southern livery

The review is is a version of one I have written for British Railway Modelling magazine the electronic version of which is published today with printed copies to be available next week. The pictures that accompany this post are copyright and courtesy of A York / BRM magazine.

The first H1 Class Atlantics were built to haul express trains between London and Brighton. They were designed by D.E. Marsh, who had been deputy to the Chief Mechanical Engineer of the Great Northern Railway, H.A. Ivatt, for 10 years until he was promoted to the top job at Brighton in January 1905. Such was the urgency for express motive power on the Brighton line that Marsh, with the full support of his former chief, borrowed a set of Doncaster drawings and made a few amendments. The result was five H1 Class locomotives which were built December 1905 and February 1906.

ex LBSC H2 Class Atlantic (picture courtesy of Bachmann)

The second batch known as the H2 Class, as depicted in this Bachmann model, although essentially to Marsh’s design it was modified by his deputy L. Billinton. These modifications included superheating, larger cylinders, a reduced boiler pressure (although this was later increased between 1936 – 1940 up to 200psi to match the H1 class) and probably and the most visible aspect being the running plate which maintained a continuous line above driving wheels and cylinders.
Six H2 Class locomotives were built at Brighton Works between 1911 and 1912 and remained on front line Brighton express work until the arrival of the King Arthur Class 4-6-0s in 1925. They were named by the SR publicity department during 1925/6 after geographical features on the South Coast. The Atlantics then continued to operate other express trains and boat trains to the ferries at Newhaven until the outbreak of World War 2 in 1939.
The class continued to work secondary services after the war but there was less work for them and some were put into store. The first H2 Class withdrawal was No. 32423 ‘The Needles’ which took place in May 1949. The last to survive was No. 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ which was withdrawn on 24th April 1958. The Bluebell Railway is currently progressing well with its project to reconstruct a Brighton H2 Atlantic, utilising a suitable ex GN boiler as the basis. (see http://www.bluebell-railway.co.uk/bluebell/locos/atlantic/ for more details)

Although originally built to the ‘Brighton’ generous loading gauge the H2 Class were subsequently modified by the Southern Railway to its composite loading gauge between 1935 and 1937 with a revised cab, cut down boiler fittings and the whistle position relocated away from being on the cab roof.

A higher 3/4 view of No 2421

Bachmann have initially released two versions:

  • 31-920        H2 Class Atlantic 4-4-2 2421 ‘South Foreland’ SR Olive Green (note: was originally announced as being 2426 ‘St. Alban’s Head’
  • 31-921        H2 Class Atlantic 4-4-2 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ BR Black Early livery

The H1 as planned in LBSC Livery for comparison with the later H2 Class. Picture courtesy and copyright Bachmann

Bachmann subsequently announced in January 2017 that they are producing in parallel the earlier H1 Class although these are still to appear.

A 3/4 rear view of No. 2421 with the original Brighton loading gauge cab and boiler fittings, and open coal rails

The 31-920 version number 2421 as modelled by Bachmann is in the condition she was in post renumbering from B421 in 1931 and prior to February 1937 when she received both the SR composite loading gauge changes and being fitted with a Maunsell type superheater and therefore receiving snifting valves on the smokebox.
The 31-921 version as number 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ in BR Black Early livery incorporates the loading gauge changes, revised front lamp iron positions and filled in coal rails on the tender.

The model matches extremely well the dimensions, look, details and elegant lines of the prototype when compared to drawings and contemporary pictures.

A close up showing the cab of No. 2421

Separately applied fittings to the body includes handrails, pipework, smokebox dart, the characteristic LSBSC lamp irons on the front buffer beam. The open cab is well detailed with a number of separately applied parts and nicely painted with pipework, gauges, valves, regulator, reverser and tip up seats all represented. The tender also includes open coal rails, fire iron stands and a cast metal full coal load to add additional weight. Other than those on the buffer beam itself the middle and top lamp irons on the tender body are moulded rather than separate fitted items.

A view of the innards showing the 3 pole motor located in the firebox area and the location of the 21 pin DCC socket in the tender with spadce for a 23mm speaker behind

The diecast metal locomotive chassis is fitted with a 3 pole motor, located within the firebox driving the rear driver axle via a gear tower although no flywheel is fitted. The boiler is packed with weight to ensure good adhesion of the four coupled driving wheels which themselves are like the prototype impressively close, although this has been achieved by them being very slightly under the scale 6’7½”.

The joggle in the connecting rod is clearly visible in this view of 2421

Due to the tight clearances between the driving wheels, footsteps, cylinders and front bogie the connecting rod has an obvious joggle in it, which is probably more obvious in its pristine finish due to reflections than it would be if slightly weathered. This is of a course a something of a compromise to ensure the ability to run round round second radius curves, but other options such as having to leave off the middle set of steps for those tighter curves is I believe a worse option.

The graceful lines of the H2 class are very apparent

Both the front bogie and the rear trailing axle are slightly sprung, the latter being a pony truck style with plenty of swing allowed between the fixed dummy side frames.
Running on my sample was smooth and quiet across all speed ranges and in a test she hauled 8 Bachmann Mk1 coaches on the level with relative ease and no wheel slip on starting.
Electrical pickups are fitted to all driving wheels and the front and rear tender wheels, the tender is permanently connected to the locomotive via a fixed length drawbar (although the locating pin on the tender is slightly adjustable to reduce the loco to tender gap) and a four-wired connection that is plugged into the tender.
A 21 Pin socket is located in the tender along with space for a 23mm diameter sound speaker, a speaker mount bracket and screws are included within the accessory pack.
Brake blocks and factory fitted brake rigging are fitted to both locomotive and tender (although the latter along with the first wheelset will require to be removed to enable the tender body to be removed to access the DCC socket) with the locomotive chassis also featuring sand boxes and fine sand pipes that complete the chassis details.

Yet another view of No. 2421 just to show how pretty the the H2 class is

The model matches extremely well the dimensions, look, details and elegant lines of the prototype when compared to drawings and contemporary photographs.
Separately applied fittings to the body includes handrails, pipework, smokebox dart, the characteristic LSBSC lamp irons on the front buffer beam. The open cab is well detailed with a number of separately applied parts and nicely painted with pipework, gauges, valves, regulator, reverser and tip up seats all represented.
The tender also includes open coal rails, fire iron stands and a metal moulded full coal load to add additional weight. Other than those on the buffer beam itself the middle and top lamp irons on the tender body are moulded rather than separate fitted items.

An accessory pack is included which includes: vacuum pipes, steam pipes, engine head signal discs, a nice option of open or closed cab doors and the cab weather sheet uprights. Also included are cosmetic screw couplings and front guard irons if no tension lock coupling is fitted and front cylinder corner infills for fitting if being used as a static display model. It is good to see that the supplied comprehensive owners information sheet details the positioning of all the separate items.

The livery application for the Southern Railway Maunsell Olive Green with white and black lining is well applied including the rear trailing truck side frames (although not all the class has these frames so lined). The tender frames are correctly plain black. The lubricator boxes atop of the splashers are picked out in brass and the cast nameplates and cabside number plates are neatly printed although a nice touch from Bachmann is that etched name and number plates are included for the owner to fit.

The introduction of these elegant looking locomotives with their distinct character, being of pre-grouping origin, with further future livery possibilities and details, that were long lived are certainly to prove popular with LBSR, SR and BR(s) modellers and gives Bachmann options for a variety of further liveries in due course, including LBSC Umber, SR malachite Green, wartime black, BR numbered malachite green and of BR lined black, as it is understood that provision has been included within the tooling for a number of the details changes that took place over time.

 

 

 

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As has been the case in previous years the team at Bachmann have provided the media, and Bachamnn Collectors Club members, with a mid-term update on work in progress across all the many stages of the manufacturing process from: research, Drawing office CAD, Tool room, Engineering Prototypes samples, livery artwork, production and being shipped. This post is a quick summary of the status of those models of a Southern Railway / British Railways Southern Region flavour. Although some items have been a long time coming, what can be seen is that catch up / progress is being made. Click on  the linked text to get more information on the details of each item from my post on the original announcement.

Bachmann 00

The EP1 of the 2HAP EMU. Picture copyright and courtesy of Bachmann.

The long-awaited ex LBSC H2 Class 4-4-2 Atlantic is very imminent, being released in two versions No. 2421 ‘South Foreland’ SR Olive Green and No. 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ BR Black Early livery. I have been fortunate to have a review sample in my possession and will be posting a review in the next week or so, watch this space.  Being produced alongside the H2 Class is the earlier H1 Class version initially as No. 39 ‘La France’ in LBSCR livery, which is also being shipped.

Within the drawing room are the many permutations, 5 types, of the Bulleid coaches along with the 4BEP (Class 410) EMU.

A front end close up of the 2HAP EP1. Picture copyright and courtesy A York

The 2HAP (Class 414) EMU is at the first Engineering Prototype (EP1) stage and as from the accompanying pictures is looking the part.  Three livery versions will initially be released being: BR green livery, BR blue & grey livery and Network South East livery. At the second Engineering Prototype stage is the 158/159 DMU with with the  3 car 159 Class to be released as No. 159013 in Network South East livery.

Graham Farish N

Recently shipped have been the four versions of the Bulleid coaches in BR(s) malachite green that together, BTK – TK – CK- BTK, create four coach set s84.

The lovely ex SECR Birdcage coaches, already released in 00, scaled down for N gauge and being released in SECR Wellington Brown, Southern Railway Olive Green and BR Crimson liveries are now approved for production.

The Class 450 and Class 319 EMUs are in the drawing office, whilst the 3 versions of the ex SECR C Class 0-6-0 as No. 271 SECR plain green livery,  No. 1256 Southern Railway Black livery and No. 31227 in BR Black livery with early emblem along with the Class 170 2 Car DMU No. in 170308 in South West Trains livery are at the artwork approval stage.

I hope you find this round up interesting and as stated above watch this space for a forthcoming review of the ex LBSC H2 Class 4-4-2 Atlantic.

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Model Rail Magazine in cooperation once again with Canadian manufacture Rapido Trains, (their previous collaboration the ex GER J70 is close to delivery) is to be producing the LBSCR Class E1 0-6-0T. Officially being announced with the publication date of the July issue No. 249 of their magazine on June 7th, however with  subscriber copies now having been delivered the information is in the public domain.

E1 Class as currently on the Isle of Wight steam railway, masquerading as W2. Originally B110 and sold to industrial use in 1927

With the exception of the final six built in 1891 under the auspices of RJ Billington with different boiler, dome and chimney known as E1s from new, the rest of the 80 strong class were originally introduced by William Stroudley from 1874 as the E Class. Essentially a larger goods version of the A1 Terrier 0-6-0t, using the same cylinders, motion and boilers as the D Class 0-4-2 passenger tanks. Later all the E Class were reclassified as E1s.

E class 686 in LB&SCR livery. Picture courtesy and copyright Mike Morant collection

Although most of the class worked on the Brighton section some were used In Southampton Docks, so ideal for Canute Road Quay, and on the Isle of Wight. Ten members of the class were converted between 1927 and 1929 to become E1/R Class 0-6-2t with new cabs, extended bunkers and the addition of a Radial axel for use in the West Country.

E1 class 2506 in post war’Sunshine’ black livery. Picture courtesy and copyright Mike Morant collection

Although withdrawals started as early as 1913 many passed into British Railways ownership with the last surviving to 1960. Four members of the class ended up being sold into industrial colliery use, including the one preserved example B110 now located on the Isle of Wight steam railway.

The initial Model Rail Magazine versions to be available, during 2020, are as follows:

  • MR-401  97 – LBSCR Stroudley Improved Engine Green
  • MR-402  127 – LBSCR Stroudley Goods Green
  • MR-403  B96 – Marsh umber but with ‘B’ prefix as applied by SR
  • MR-404  2142 – SR black (pre-War)
  • MR-405  2606 – SR black, ‘sunshine’ lettering
  • MR-406  32151 – BR lined black, no emblem
  • MR-407  32113 – BR plain black, early emblem
  • MR-408  32689 – BR plain black, early emblem (weathered)
  • MR-409  W2 – SR (IoW) lined green
  • MR-410  W4 – BR (IoW) black, early emblem

They will be available soon to be pre-ordered via the Model Rail Offers website managed by the Kernow Model Rail Centre.

Full details of the specification to follow.

Also announced by Model Rail Magazine, also via Rapido Trains is the BR(w) 0-6-0 16xx Class pannier tanks.

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