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Posts Tagged ‘LBSC’

With a nod to the fact that today, 23rd April, is not only St Georges Day, but also the date on which William Shakespeare is understood to have both been born and this year the 400th anniversary of his death, hence the stretching of a few quotations from his writings (so much more than witterings) in the title.
My last Workbench Witterings #4 post detailed some of the locomotives I have been working on and finishing over the last few weeks and this Workbench Witterings #5 post shows a few more.

The Kernow Model Rail Centre O2 number 225 now weathered

The Kernow Model Rail Centre O2 number 225 now weathered

First up is a pair of the Kernow Model Rail Centre ex LSWR Adams O2 class, 0-4-4Ts in the form of two mainland versions in SR post war black livery. Number 225, Kernow Model Rail Centre release K2105, was already in post 1946 SR black so has been lightly weathered, crew added

O2 Number 225 will be coupled to a Pull Push set using a prototypical screw coupling

O2 Number 225 will be coupled to a Pull Push set using a prototypical screw coupling

(nice and simple to do as the cab roof is designed to be easily removed) and real coal added to the bunker.
She will generally be seen on Fisherton Sarum sharing duties with an M7 class loco coupled to my Pull Push set number 734 or the Kernow Model Rail Centre ex LSWR Gate Stock Pull Push sets when they arrive.

O2 Number 193 on shunting duties

O2 Number 193 for use on shunting duties

Number 193 started life in BR lined black livery as 30193, Kernow Model Rail Centre release K2106,  and repainted into unlined SR livery, unlike 225 is non pull push fitted.
Now backdated to number 193 as well as crew on the footplate and real coal added to the bunker she has been fitted with both red and white lamps at each end on the lamp irons above the buffers, as per a locomotive carrying our shunting duties.

A rear 3/4 view of O2 number 193

A rear 3/4 view of O2 number 193

I have also, carefully using a small razor saw, cut out the cab doors as these were only found on the pull push fitted mainland O2s (although those on the Isle of Wight also had cab doors). To reduce the distance that the tension lock coupling extends past the buffers I also shortened the NEM coupling pocket slightly by cutting off a few millimeters from the front face and holding the tension lock coupling in with a spot of glue.
If you own one these Kernow Model Rail Centre O2s it is also worth checking that the back to backs of the driving wheels are correctly set to 14.5mm, as some have reported issues with haulage which has mainly been due to the back to backs being slightly too wide and simple to rectify by pushing the wheels in slightly, not that mine needed any such adjustment.

A repainted and weathered Bachmann E4

A repainted and weathered Bachmann E4

Next up is a Bachmann ex LBSC Billington E4 Class, 0-6-2T repainted and numbered as 2486. Although ex LBSC locomotives they could seen seen across a wide area of the Southern network. After the closure of the Salisbury Western Region shed in 1950 the ex SR shed was allocated numbers 32506 and 32486.

A rear 3/4 view of a work stained E4 number 2486

A rear 3/4 view of a work stained E4 number 2486

This was reported as being much to the annoyance of the ex WR crews on the duty shunting Fisherton Yard as they preferred their previsous GWR pannier tanks! So modellers licence regarding the bringing date of allocation to Salisbury slightly earlier will apply on Fisherton Sarum. She has been finished in a condition where she could benefit from a good clean and a bit of an overhaul.

Van B number 231

Van B number 231

Finally for now, it is not just locomotives that I have got round to finishing off with a bit of weathering, also seen here are a couple of Non Passenger Carrying Cars.
Firstly the Hornby Bogie Van B that I  mentioned on my Workbench Witterings #1 post after repainted into malachite green a while ago as non stove fitted version number 231.

A weathered Bachmann PLV

A weathered Bachmann PLV

The other is a Bachmann PLV, Parcels Luggage Van (coded PMV in BR parlance) and is still in Maunsell green under the layer of grime.

As I said before I have managed to catch up with finishing a number outstanding projects and these last two Workbench Witterings Posts don’t yet cover them all but I wont bore you with more pictures of weathered black locomotives for now  so watch this space for something different next time around.

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What was previously known as the ‘Model of the Year’ awards have this year been promoted on RMweb, through British Railways Modelling Magazine and on the online MREmag.com as the British Model Railway Awards. As part of the evolution the categories were broadened to celebrate excellence and innovation in the wider British model railway scene. New awards now also cover retailers, websites, exhibitions and layouts, acknowledging the huge contributions they make to our hobby.

The winners of the first British Model Railway Awards for 2015 have been announced today and can be read here.

Kernow Models K2105 number 225 as mainland pull push fitted sits awaiting coaling on Fisherton Sarum

Kernow Models K2105 number 225 as mainland pull push fitted sits awaiting coaling on Fisherton Sarum

Congratulations to all the winners; and in particular the Kernow Model Rail Centre  for winning the best 00 gauge steam locomotive for their  ex London and South Western Railway Adams O2 class 0-4-4T , Graham Farish for winning the N gauge steam locomotive of the year with their original Bulleid Merchant Navy 4-6-2 and also Dapol for winning the best 0 Gauge steam locomotive with their ex London Brighton and South Coast A1 / A1X Terrier 0-6-0T, therefore ensuring that the Southern Railway is well represented in the awards, which is always good news.

Also well done to the UK Model Shops website for justifiably winning the website of the year award, in which I was surprised and honoured for this humble web blog to have been nominated and came 4th, so many thanks to all who did take the time to vote.

 

 

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In May last year I reported that the small manufacturer of Ready To Run locomotive 00 Works are to produce seven variations of the ex London Brighton and South Coast Railway Marsh I3 4-4-2 Tanks.  The first version has now arrived from 00 Works, although I have not personally ordered one myself (I already have a kit built one, that can be seen here in my Talking Stock #25 post along with some further details on the prototype) I am indebted to fellow Southern modeller Tony Teague for his photographs and comments below.

The 00 Works I3 4-4-2T Picture courtesy and copyright T Teague

The 00 Works I3 4-4-2T in plain black with no decals. Picture courtesy and copyright T Teague

This release follows on from a number of Southern locomotive produced by the ’00’ Works in the past such as: N15, 700, C, E4 and 0415 Adams Radial classes (although of course these have now all been subsequently been announced or produced by the major manufacturers). The level of detail of these models has steadily improved over time, although is still not as high as we see from the likes of Hornby and Bachmann, or from if built carefully from kits.

A rear 3/4 view of the 00 Works I3, note the lack of buffer beam lamp irons. Picture courtesy and copyright T Teague

A rear 3/4 view of the 00 Works I3, note the lack of buffer beam lamp irons. Picture courtesy and copyright T Teague

Tony advised: The I3 has a bit more detail than seen on previous 00 Works models including some interior cab detail, etched rear cab window grills, wire handrails and a good representation of a Westinghouse pump; from my perspective as a Southern Railway modeller the numberplate moulded onto the smoke box door is not quite so helpful on what is a plain, unnumbered version, but I’ll probably live with it. The moulded coal in the bunker does not look good; if real coal is not supplied, as it has been on some previous 00 Works models, then I’d prefer an empty bunker. The model has a smooth, fairly quiet motor and I put it onto a fairly heavy test train without any running in, and it was able to pull away, albeit with some wheel-slip, and make good speed.

A higher view of the I3 note the lack of smokebox top, and side bufferbeam lamp irons. Picture courtesy and copyright T Teague

A higher view of the I3 note the lack of smokebox top, and side bufferbeam lamp irons. Picture courtesy and copyright T Teague

Tony continued; advising that he has obtained a number of the 00 Works releases since 2002: Some are much better than others – I like their N15 King Arthur’s for example, but at the other end the Adams Radial is an awful performer! Early models also tended to have the bodies fixed to the chassis via a large, visible screw, but I have to say that like other manufacturers, 00 Works have progressed and improved, and I feel that the I3 is one of their best. Given the current cost of getting a kit built and the lack of any RTR I3 in the foreseeable future I am still of the view that this represents reasonable value for money.

From my own view of the images Tony supplied and those I have seen elsewhere I also note that although this model includes the characteristic LBSC style front tall middle iron positions, but it omits the buffer beam lamp irons at the base the of the tall ones and the upper smokebox position completely, although the centre lamp iron is present. On the Bunker rear however the upper and two middle lamp irons are include but not any on the buffer beam. Another area that has slightly let down the finish of the 00 Works releases in the past has been the highly visible carrier film to decals especially the numbers, although Tony’s is an unnumbered version I have seen that this issue still exists on their numbered releases.

Despite these small issues the model from 00 Works fills a niche gap in the RTR market and a with little additional detail makes a fine model. Thanks again for Tony for his pictures and comments on this model.

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Last year I posted about Armchair Ready-To-Run designers being an extension of the  term “armchair modeller” that has been used in the hobby referring to those who are vocal in criticism and comment but are sat in their comfy chairs tapping away on their keyboards without actually the processes involved in various aspects of the hobby. That particular post focused on the design side of things and why just because one model has been produced it should mean that a further slightly different model can or should also be produced.

The NRM Ivatt C1 Atlantic

The NRM Ivatt C1 Atlantic (picture courtesy and copyright NRM)

The announcement today by the National Railway Museum working with Bachmann of the exclusive model of the ex Great Northern Railways Ivatt C1 4-4-2 Atlantic locomotive has prompted this further ‘Armchair’ post.
Some say… that such a model was inevitable as Bachmann had already announced the ex LBSC Marsh H2 Class Atlantic.

ex LBSC H2 Class Atlantic  (picture courtesy of Bachmann)

ex LBSC H2 Class Atlantic (picture courtesy of Bachmann)

It is true that the  Marsh H2 Class and its predecessor the  H1 class can be directly traced back to the Ivatt C1 Atlantic owing to the fact Marsh had previously worked with Ivatt on the C1 class whilst he worked for the GNR and that the boiler and a proportion of the chassis design is the same.

In model terms though such lineage does not necessary mean savings in design, tooling, or production costs. As I mentioned in my previsious armchair post a common boiler does not help with tooling costs as often it is combined with different cabs, fitting,  running plates or other differing details. In the case of the two Atlantic models, and I discussed this with Bachmann staff a couple of weeks ago,  in reality only approximately 70% of only the chassis components are actually common. The loco body, tender and trailing truck are all different and therefor unique tooling. Therefore it is only a small proportion of time that can be potentially saved at the design stage,  as such as design work carried over for those small number of common components (remember its  approx 70% of the chassis only that is common) that can be simply copied.

Even with these limited number of common parts the two models are likely to be completely separately tooled. This is due to other reasons which a lot of people do not consider such as: the fact that if part of the tooling is used for more than model it creates double the wear on certain tools compared to the rest, the logistical issues of either stock holding between production runs or trying to manage production slots of both models at the same time.
This logistical challenge is hard enough for Bachmann whom unlike Hornby only have production at one factory. Hornby have different models being made at a number of  factories which is another reason why they would not usually share any aspect of tolling or components between models / factories as other wise it would be a logistical, transport and stock holding nightmare, in addition to the issue of uneven tooling wear.

I hope this post gives further food for thought into the issues that have to be considered in the design, tooling  and production of models for the Ready-To-Run market.

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Further to my post yesterday that broke the news that Bachmann are to produce an 00 scale ex London Brighton and South Coast Atlantic H2 Class 4-4-2 I can now provide some further details.

The Bachmann press release is as follows:

The Atlantics were built to haul express trains between London and Brighton including the prestigious Pullman trains before completion of the electrification scheme on 1st January 1933.

32424 “Beachy Head” BR Black Early Emblem (Picture Courtesy Bachmann Plc)

32424 “Beachy Head” BR Black Early Emblem (Picture Courtesy Bachmann Plc)

They were designed by D.E. Marsh, who had been deputy to the Chief Mechanical Engineer of the Great Northern Railway, H.A. Ivatt, for 10 years until he was promoted to the top job at Brighton in January 1905. Such was the urgency for express motive power on the Brighton line that Marsh, with the full support of his former chief, borrowed a set of Doncaster drawings and made a few amendments. The result was five H1 Class locomotives which were built by Kitson’s of Leeds between December 1905 and February 1906.

The second batch (Class H2) although to Marsh design was modified by his deputy L. Billinton. Billinton was Acting Chief Mechanical Engineer due to Marsh being absent on extended sick leave. In 1912 Billinton took over permanently when Marsh resigned, holding the position until Grouping in 1923.

2426 ‘St. Alban’s Head’ in Southern Railway olive green livery

2426 ‘St. Alban’s Head’ in Southern Railway olive green livery  (Picture Courtesy Bachmann Plc)

Six H2 Class locomotives were built at Brighton Works and remained on front line Brighton express work until the arrival of the King Arthur Class 4-6-0s in 1925. They were named after geographical features on the South Coast. The Atlantics then continued to operate other express trains and also boat trains to the ferries at Newhaven (for Dieppe, France) until the outbreak of World War 2 in 1939 brought the duties to a premature end.

The class continued to work secondary services after the war but there was less work for them and some were put into store. The first H2 Class withdrawal was No. 32423 ‘The Needles’ which took place in May 1949. The last to survive was No. 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ which was scrapped at Eastleigh following withdrawal on 24th April 1958.

The Bachmann Branchline OO scale model will be released in 2015. Two versions are planned initially which are;

31-920 H2 Class Atlantic 4-4-2 No. 2426 ‘St. Alban’s Head’ in Southern Railway olive green livery. Edit: Nov 2017 this model has now been changed to number 2411 “South Foreland”
31-921 H2 Class Atlantic 4-4-2 No. 32424 ‘Beachy Head’ in BR black livery with early emblem.

Models will incorporate a DCC socket. Prices will be advised in due course.

David Haarhaus, Bachmann’s European Sales & Marketing Manager said “We believe that the H2 Class locomotive will be popular with modellers and the emergence of the replica at Sheffield Park over the coming years will introduce the class to new generations of railway enthusiasts and modellers. We are working closely with the Bluebell Railway Atlantic Group and thank them for assisting us with this project”.

Sadly railway preservation was still in its infancy and ‘Beachy Head’ was scrapped before the formation of the Bluebell Railway in March 1959. This locomotive had worked part of the Locomotive Club of Great Britain Southern Counties Limited Rail tour on 24th February 1957 from Horsted Keynes to Brighton.

Beachy Head replica is taking shape at the Bluebell Railway. The driving wheels will be added soon

Beachy Head replica is taking shape at the Bluebell Railway. The driving wheels will be added soon.

In 2000, the Bluebell Railway Atlantic Group was formed to build a replica of ‘Beachy Head’ for use on the extended Bluebell Railway between Sheffield Park and East Grinstead. Since then the group has acquired many parts including a GNR ‘Atlantic’ boiler, tender frames and wheel sets. Other items are being manufactured and the project has now reached an advanced stage.

I had the privilege to view progress on the build yesterday during a tour of f Atlantic House. The frames are now assembled cylinders, slide bars, inside motion  and the start of the cab metalwork in place, the cross heads and sandboxes are ready to be installed along with some brake linkages. She will soon be ready for the finished cast and machined driving wheels to be fitted (the pony truck is also already complete). The ex GNR boiler is also substantially complete and awaiting tubing before the smokebox can be finished. I look forward to completion of the this project in maybe as little as 4 to 5 years.  If you would like to assist with this project you can sponsor a component here.

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Bachmann Europe Plc today, 31st August, have announced the addition to their range of an 00 scale ex London Brighton and South Coast Atlantic H2 Class 4-4-2

The announcement was made at their annual Bachmann Collectors Club members day that co-incidentally was taking place at the Bluebell Railway.

The new model will be released as:
31-921 – 32424 “Beachy Head” BR Black Early Emblem
31-920 – 2426 ‘St. Albans Head” SR Olive Green

Although none are preserved a replica of Beachy Head is currently being built on the Bluebell Railway.

Edit: just clarify this will be a general release anticipated to be available during 2015. Only the two liveries have been announced but maybe others will follow in due course.

In other news Model Rail magazine have today announced that their USA tank will now be produced by Bachmann rather than Dapol.

Further details will be posted later once I have returned from the event and I would like to take this opportunity to thank Bachmann and the Bluebell Railway for the hospitality provided to myself and fellow members of the media, retailers and collectors club members that have attended. The day has included guided tours of the Wagon & Carriage Works, Locomotive Workshops and of course the Atlantic House workshop to see the progress being made on the replica, along with train travel along the entire line including the new Northern extension to East Grinstead aboard heritage rolling stock chartered by Bachmann.

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With respect to the Southern Railway Mogul 2-6-0 locomotive fleet most people probably immediately think of the Maunsell Moguls,  the N/N1 and U/U1 classes. Their origins lead back to the SECR for the 5’6″ driving wheeled N class followed by the later Southern built, also under the design auspices of Maunsell who was now CME of the Southern, the U class with their larger 6′ driving wheels.
The missing mogul in more ways than one is the ex London Brighton and South Coast railway (LBSC)  K class  designed by LB Billinton. First introduced in  1913 the eventual 17 members of the class were the first 2-6-0 locomotives on the LBSC and the first with a Belpair firebox, and like the Maunsell N class  also had 5’6″ driving wheels. They were generally seen as one of the most successful LBSC locomotive designs.
It is a great shame that no examples were preserved, hence the missing mogul.  It was a class of locomotive  on the wish list of the fledgling Bluebell Railway, as members of the class were still in service  when the Bluebell Railway was formed, however obtaining one was considered too expensive at the time.

K 2346_2

K Class number 2346 built from an old K’s white metal kit

Although  mainly employed on the central section for freight use they did occasionally wonder further west and east. I am not sure if one ever made it to Salisbury or not but the Brighton to Cardiff trains that changed engines at Salisbury could sometimes throw up a surprise loco from Brighton so it might have been possible.

A missing mogul both in preservation and also model kit or RTR form

A missing mogul both in preservation and also model kit or RTR form

My K class number 2346 shown left is built from an old Keyser (K’s) white metal kit, and makes an occasional appearance on Fisherton Sarum.

Sadly the K’s kit is not available anymore, so even in model form the class is still the missing mogul both in either Ready To Run (RTR) or kit form. Maybe now is the time to vote for a RTR K class in the current RMweb / MRE Mag wish list poll, along with perhaps voting for a few other Southern items at the same time. The results of this annual poll whilst not having a direct link to the manufacturers certainly is referred to by them when considering  their future plans.

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