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Posts Tagged ‘Fisherton Sarum’

This months picture…

Maunsell 2-6-0 N1 class 1822 heads west on a freight service. 1822 has been converted from a Bachmann N Class with modified front end and valve gear. The first four wagons are banana vans piped with steam heating to help ripen the fruit.

Maunsell 2-6-0 N1 class 1822 heads west on a freight service. 1822 has been converted from a Bachmann N Class with modified front end and valve gear. The first four wagons are banana vans piped with steam heating to help ripen the fruit.

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This months picture…

Bulleid Light Pacific, Battle of Britain 21C151 'Winston Churchill' is turned at Fisherton Sarum.

Bulleid Light Pacific, Battle of Britain 21C151 ‘Winston Churchill’ is turned at Fisherton Sarum.

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Wear and tear occurs on anything mechanical over time and model railways are no exception, especially when subjected to the rigors (and occasionally operator error) of exhibiting for hours on end at shows. One of the focal points on Fisherton Sarum is of course the turntable which during an exhibition seems to be pretty much constantly on the go especially when younger viewing eyes are present.

My T14 is turned on the turntable at Fisherton Sarum

I have posted before about the turntable on Fisherton Sarum in my Controlling Interests #2 post here., but as a quick recap the turntable comprises of a Peco LK-55 kit where I have utilised the well and deck, whilst adding scratch built sides to represent the turntable installed at Salisbury; and it is controlled by  MERG turntable control kit which drives via a stepper motor and gearbox.
During the last couple of shows I attended with Fisherton Sarum I noticed that the operation of the turntable was getting less and less reliable mainly due to issues of the plastic drive shaft mounting hub on the underside of the table deck starting to disintegrate and wear to the  track power feed split contact ring.  I therefore decided to hopefully remedy the issues by removing the deck and trying to replace the drive shaft mount and also effect a repair on the power feed ring. However having examined the removed turntable and due to the lack of the original plastic now remaining at the mounting point it proved difficult to align my replacement metal bush accurately, both vertically and centrally, to give reliable running.

The original scratch built side sides have been grafted onto the new deck

I have now therefore obtained a replacement turntable kit and built a brand new replacement deck (if anyone wants the kits well components that I now have surplus to requirements let me know, free to a good home…) and carefully added the scratch built sides from the original deck to the new one.

The replacement split ring pick up bush in the middle of the well

I have also replaced the now worn power feed split ring in the turntable well as the plungers on the underside of the deck over time had worn a groove and then starting to catch on the edge of the copper split rings.
In order to make future maintenance easier and allowing easy removal of the deck, if required, I have also now incorporated new direct coupling with grub screws. I carefully drilled on a pillar drill to ensure vertical alignment, the bush in the underside of the deck to suit a 4mm OD silver steel rod to match the output shaft of the gearbox and the coupling,  as the Peco LK-55  kit is designed to be interference fit  for a standard Meccano imperial Standard Wire gauge 8 shaft.
I had tried as an experiment a  Ruland Aluminium Flexible Beam Coupling, from RS Components to link the drive shafts of the deck and gearbox, but although these are designed specifically for use with stepper motor drive systems where no back lash is a requirement a certain amount of juddering occurred as they flexed, so I have gone back to a fixed brass coupling but one with two opposing grub screws at each end to ensure a good grip on the shafts (which as per good practice have a slight flat filed on them to ensure the grub screw can grip properly.

The replacement turntable has been fitted and tested on Fisherton Sarum and means that the layout is all ready for its next outing at the Hampton Court MRS, Tolworth Showtrain, on 11th / 12th November at the Tolworth Recreation Centre, Fullers Way North, Tolworth, Surrey, KT6 7LQ

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It has been just over a month since Canute Road Quay made its first proper public exhibition appearance at the excellent Exe Model Railway Society’s exhibition so I thought a little update might be in order.  It certainly made a change taking a layout to an exhibition where I could firstly see out of the rear window of the car and secondly, unload, be set up and operational within 20 mins of arriving at the venue. Fisherton Sarum takes up the whole of the rear of the estate car (seats down and floor to ceiling) and on average takes about an hour to set up!

With Simon at the controls, Canute Road Quay is closely inspected by visitors at the Exe MRS show last month.

One of the advantages of taking a layout to a show a distance away is the opportunity to see layouts that I do not usually get to see and also it’s a chance catch up with friends (some of whom even had a play) and acquaintances from the area that I don’t often get to meet up with and this show did not disappoint on either count.

My kit built ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0T shunts at the Quay.

From an operational perspective I was ably, and with thanks,  assisted for the weekend by friend and fellow modeller Simon Paley and we found that operating the layout on an hour on / hour off basis worked exceptionally well and kept the operational interest up on what at the end of the day is just a little shunting layout.

Two USA 0-6-0 tanks (No’s 64 and 72) meet in front of the Waterloo Arms public house and road crossing.

Also the operating position purposely located at the front left hand end enabled pleasant and easy interaction with the viewing public.  I was very pleased with the positive reaction and comments  from the visitors to the show, especially my little bit of cheating with perspective for the terraced houses on the backscene that can be read about here. I also picked a few more potential exhibition invites that I shall follow-up accordingly.

There are a few things still to complete on Canute Road Quay such as: adding proper interiors and lighting for the front two main buildings (which are not yet permanently fixed down so I can complete this activity), actually wiring up the street lamps so they work, finishing the gantry crane with its hook and pulley and some more weathering of the buildings especially on the roof lines as a result of the number of seagulls present!

The Adams B4 0-4-0T is still in use and not yet ousted by the USA 0-6-0Ts soon to rule the Quay.

Also since the exhibition I have taken the opportunity to take a few more snaps of Canute Road Quay, during a couple of running (play), which is one of the advantages of being a small layout that I am able have set up all the time at home.  Some of these quick snaps can be seen accompanying this post.

USA 0-6-0T shunts right on the edge of the Quay whilst the fireman “can see no ships”.

In my Lighting is Quay post I discussed the use of the LED strip lightning that I have deployed on Canute Road Quay although at home and for most of the time at the Exe MRS show the lighting was extremely effective there was at certain times of the day a shadow cast on the backscene of the front pelmet due to sunlight shining in through venues high level windows (I do not think it was really noticed by visitors to the show but I found it a little annoying at times from an overall presentation perspective). I have therefore fitted a second LED strip without any opaque strip of plastic in front to enable either of both LED strips to be switched on to give three different lighting levels to counter an effects of a venues ambient lighting.

In other news, I have been approached by two of the main model railway magazines to feature Canute Road Quay, in order to allow time between publication and ensure that different articles can be written I have accepted one of the approaches, give priority to the magazine whose lovely exclusive tank locomotives gave rise the initial idea of building the layout in the first place, so it shouldn’t take much to work out which magazine it will feature in first… The photoshoot has been arranged for September with the article hopefully appearing before the end of the year, so watch this space.

 

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This months picture…

Douchess class No. 46236 'City of Bradford' is turned at Fisherson Sarum during trial runs for the 1948 Locomotive Exchange trials, she is coupled to a WD tender due to the SR not having any water troughs.

Stanier Duchess class No. 46236 ‘City of Bradford’ is turned at Fisherson Sarum during trial runs for the 1948 Locomotive Exchange trials, she is coupled to a WD type tender for the trials due to the SR not having any water troughs.

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This months picture…

Bulleid Merchant Navy class 21C14 'Nederland Line' built from a Millholme kit, heads to London with the up Devon Belle having taken over the train at Wilton. Adams O2 built from a Wills kit, shunts the ash wagon on shed. My Grandfather, a Ganger,  can be seen taking a break leaning on his ballast fork near the platelayers hut.

Bulleid Merchant Navy class 21C14 ‘Nederland Line’ built from a Millholme kit, heads to London with the up Devon Belle having taken over the train at Wilton. Adams O2 built from a Wills kit, shunts the ash wagon on shed. My Grandfather, a Ganger, can be seen taking a break leaning on his ballast fork near the platelayers hut.

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This months picture…

Drummond 0-4-4T M7 No. 243 is one of the 6 painted in Malachite Green after the war but is one of those that were unlined, she is a repainted Hornby model. She has just shunted the ash wagon for filling by the gang.

Drummond 0-4-4T M7 No. 243 is one of the 6 painted in Malachite Green after the war but is one of those that were unlined, she is a repainted Hornby model. She has just shunted the ash wagon for filling by the gang.

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