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Posts Tagged ‘Drummond’

Following on from my recent Talking Stock #38 The Adams B4 tanks post that included a brief history of the prototype and also a review of the recent range of Dapol ready to run models, I have added a few of these to my fleet for Canute Road Quay and therefore renamed and numbered to suit my preferred modelling period.

In all these instances I have not repainted the original model but used my time served method of a good quality enamel thinners applied to the original model printing and then after a soak of around 5 minutes or so rubbing off with a thinners soaked cotton bud. This does leave a shiny finish where the rubbing has been carried, but this is a good surface to apply fresh decals to.

I then leave the model to fully dry in a ventilated area for a day or so to ensure that no traces of the thinners remain. I then applied new decals from a number of sources depending on the model being created.

No. 82 has been repainted from no. 30084  Note the tool boxes have also been relocated to the slightly further forward position as per No.82

No. 89 Trueville

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition

For standard Southern Railway post war lettering I use Pressfix transfers from the HMRS Southern Bulleid Sheet 10 as per my backdating of No 30084 to No. 82. Note also that for this identity change I also relocated the tank top tool boxes slightly further forward as per No.82 in real life.

For ‘Trueville’ that utilised No. 90 ‘Caen’ as the base model in Southampton Docks lined brown livery. I used modified Pressfix SR coach lettering, to form all the required letters that I applied individually, also from the HMRS Bulleid sheet 10.

When Normandy left the docks in 1946 she was repainted in to post war black livery at Eastleigh and instead of regaining her number 96, she retained her name but it was applied in Bulleid post war ‘Sunshine’ style. This was obtained from Cambridge Custom Transfers via friend and excellent modeller Matt Wickham. I used the BR version of 30096 as the basis for this backdating.

Once the decals have been applied I spray with Railmatch Satin varnish from a rattle can to both seal the decals and restore a consistent finish, I then like to brush paint the smokebox, chimney, cab roof and cylinders matt black prior to weathering etc.

For those wanting to renumber BR versions, or simply wnating to enhance the fact that Dapol only print the smokebox door number plate directly onto the door with no representation of the number plate, etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby. 

Hopefully this demonstrates how quick and easy renumbering and renaming can be, as we can not expect a manufacturer to produce every number and variant that we might want. Should a full repaint be required then I have also adopted a reasonably quick and simple process and this is described in my Workbench Wittering #3 post here.

 

 

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Due to the expansion of the many small yards and docks the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) required a number of small tank locomotives. First introduced by Adams in 1891 the B4 class of 0-4-0 tanks comprised initially of two batches of ten built at Nine Elms works and the first ten were completed by 1892.

No. 88 of the first batch of 10 B4s in early SR lined livery

When compared with other 0-4-0t of the time the B4 class, were quite large in comparison. Even with their enclosed slightly cramped footplate, limited coal space; were powerful and so became popular with their crews. This first batch entered service across the LSWR network and were numbered 85 to 94

Guernsey’ as first introduced in 1893 in original lined green livery and cutaway cab

No. 96 ‘Normandy’, repainted into post war condition. Note cab differences

No. 90 ‘Caen’ in Docks lined brown livery.

The LSWR absorbed the Southampton Dock Company in November 1892 and it soon became clear that more powerful shunting locomotives would be required after a trial with one of the first batch of B4s, the first two of the second batch of ten were assigned to the Docks. In keeping with the existing Docks engines they were constructed with cut away cabs with a single central circular window, and carried names ‘Guernsey’ and ‘Jersey’ rather than numbers (later 176 and 81 respectively) and arrived, painted in a lined green livery, in the ‘Docks in November 1983. Of the remaining second batch numbers 95 to 100, 102 & 103, two more were built with the cut away cabs for the Docks becoming ‘Normandy’ (96) and ‘Brittany’ (97).
Between February and April 1896 a further four B4s were transferred to the docks and therefore also modified with cutaway cabs and names these were No.86 ‘Havre’, 93 ‘St Malo’, 95 ‘Honfleur’ and 102 ‘Granville’
Four more B4s made their way to docks, retaining their enclosed cabs: No. 85 becoming ‘Alderney’ and 98 ‘Cherbourg’ in April 1900 along with No.89 ‘Trouville’ and 90 ‘Caen in March 1901.

The livery of the B4s within the Docks changed during the 1920s from the in essence LSWR green livery to that of Brown with red lining and this remained as such, even post Grouping, until they left the Docks in 1946 where they gained standard Southern Railway livery of the time as per their non dock counterparts.

One of the Drummond K14 class later to be reclassified B4 class note the cab roof profile and dome mounted safety valves

During 1908 a further five shunting engines were introduced by Drummond, seventeen years after the first Adams B4s, there were initially classed as K14s but were essentially B4s with Drummond style boilers (identifiable by dome mounted safety valves) , chimneys and a slightly different cab roof  profile. The first two were sent to Southampton Docks and named ‘Dinard (147) and ‘Dinan’ (101). The rest were numbered 82 to 84. they were soon reclassified as members of the B4 class.

No.89 Trueville Note the linseed filtrator behind the dome

During their lifetime a few changes were made such as those in the Docks being fitted with a linseed filtrator that was mounted on the boiler to counter issues with the use of the sources of water used at the docks between 1901 and the early 1940s.
During the 1920s those cutaway cabs had the drivers side front sheet filled in and also acquiring side sheets of various homemade designs. Proper metal front and side sheets were eventually fitted to all for blackout purposes during the war.
The Adams and Drummond boilers were interchangeable and therefore during their life time some Adams built versions carried Drummond boilers and visa-versa, it is therefore important to refer to records and or photographs when considering a chosen prototype and period.

Dols B4 No. 87 and K14 No. 30084 for comparison

Dapol No. 87 and 96 for comparison

Dapol cab rears showing different tooling

B4s No. 30089 and 30096 front comparison

A trio of the Dapol B4s

Those pictured on this post are based on the recent two batches of Dapol and some of its variations. Dapol have tooled for some of the variations for a number of variations including four cab styles, Adams and Drummond boilers, buffer head sizes and different chimneys, however some compromises have been made and therefore there are a few errors including: possibly the number of boiler bands, variation combinations not appropriate to the particular livery (such as buffer head sizes), missing injector, missing front middle lamp iron (as fitted to some prototypes at the base of the smokebox door) and the cab ventilation holes just under the roof line front and rear are raised mouldings rather than actual holes (a possible translation from CAD to tool issue).

I also note that on the BR livery version the smokebox door number plate is unusually completely a transfer rather printing on a moulded or an etched plate (although this may possibly be an advantage to those like me that are repainting into an earlier livery).Etched plates for all members of the class are available from 247 Developments run by friend and fellow modeller Brian Mosby.  

Electrical Pick ups are, as you would expect and indeed necessary, wipers on all the rear of four wheels with an open slew wound five pole motor (rather than now more common can motors) driving the rear axle via a flywheel and gear tower. The front axle being sprung.

It also features a firebox glow which is quite dim, especially at low speeds on DC but might appear consistently brighter on DCC. No separate items are supplied for the owner to fit, with the exception of a unique very wide replacement tension lock coupling bar.
It should also be noted that of the seven Dapol models I have purchased two were dead on arrival (due to a misassembled bearing and a broken cylinder mounting bracket) that I fixed myself, and on Guernsey the cab rear panel was not seated properly leaving one of the handrails loose, but easily rectified. No 87 has both rear sandboxes with pipes loose in the packaging so needed gluing in place.

Despite the above comments it is overall a good model, performs well and very much a welcome addition to the fleet for Canute Road Quay as seen in action below.

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This month picture…

Maunsell S15 4-6-0 is prepared for her next West of England goods turn. She is built from a DJH white metal kit. Just visible alongside is a Drummond K10 “Small Hopper” 4-4-0

 

PS. Happy Birthday to my Dad on the 16th of this Month…

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The Dapol ex LSWR B4 class 0-4-0t were first announced back in March 2014 and the first versions arrived in June last year.  Yesterday Dapol announced further livery and detail variants, as below,  including the first appearance of the Drummond Boiler fitted and one of the 5 off Drummond K14 versions.

I have a number of these models running on Canute Road Quay, although a couple of which were ‘;Dead on Arrival’ I was able to fix them and they have proved to be nice runners.

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The ’00’ Works have produced a number of small batches of hand built Ready to Run locomotives including a variety of Southern classes, including most recently an ex London and South Western Drummond D15 4-4-0 and also  ex London Brighton and South Coast Railway Marsh I3 4-4-2 Tanks. They also produced, before Hornby, a brass Devon Belle Observation car which graces Fisherton Sarum.
The ’00’works have announced that they are to produce three  versions of the ex London and South Western Drummond K10 4-4-0 mixed traffic locomotives, known as “Small Hoppers”.

The Image of the CAD drawing released by the 00 Works for their ex LSWR K10 Class

Initially three versions are being produced, due for production this year, with pre-orders available to be taken via their website:

  • SR Sage / Olive Lined No. 347
  • SR Black Bulleid Black Sunshine lettering No. 389
  • BR Black No. 30382 (early emblem)

The will no doubt follow the earlier releases and will comprise of an all Metal cast body and fitted with a Coreless motor. The K10 will also come fitted with slimline Bachmann/Hornby type couplings which can be unscrewed to replace if required. Delivery is expected late 2019.

 

My model of a K10 Class No. 389 ‘Small Hopper’. Built from a Sharp etched brass kit

As I explained in my Talking Stock#17 Post hereDrummond was responsible for the introduction of 18 locomotive types including from the diminutive C14 class, 700’s, M7’s, a number of 4-4-0 classes including of course the renown T9 ‘Greyhounds’ class a small number of 4-6-0’s classes such as the T14’s and also a couple of railcars too. In 1901/2 Drummond introduced the K10 class known as “Small Hoppers” (the later larger Drummond L11 class was known as the “Large Hoppers”) they were a class of 40 which shared the same cylinders, boiler and firebox as the earlier C8 class but with 5’7″ driving wheels for mixed traffic duties. Like the C8 class their steaming ability was not great so they generally were kept on secondary routes.

Another view of my kit built K10 Class

They were mainly paired with 3500 six wheel tenders although some were paired with the larger 4000 gallon 8 wheel ‘watercart’ tenders.
The K10s were never superheated and had few changes during their lifetime apart from the original Drummond firebox water tubes being removed by Urie and the removal of the smokebox wingplates. Ten of the class were fitted with stovepipe chimneys in 1925 to allow their use on the Eastern Section.  Nine members of the class were withdrawn in 1947 with the remaining entering British Railways stock for a brief while, only No. 30382 received its BR Number whilst  No. 389 was the last to survive until July 1951.

Past Southern locomotive produced by the ’00’ Works, some of which have since been produced or announced by the major manufacturers, has in addition to the D15 and I3 mentioned above, included: N15, 700, C, H,  E4 and Adams Radial classes. The level of detail of these models has steadily improved over time, although is still not as high as we seem from the likes of Hornby or Bachmann, they have in the past filled gaps in the market and they should be applauded for taking on another LSWR / Southern prototype.

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The small manufacturer of Ready To Run locomotive 00 Works announced back in May 2017 their intention to produce a batch of ex LSWR Drummond 4-4-0 D15s  A number of the versions have now arrived from 00 Works, although as with many of their releases I have not personally ordered one myself (I already have a couple of kit built examples,  that can be seen here in my Talking Stock #17 post along with some further details on the prototype) I am indebted to friend and fellow Southern modeller Tony Teague for once again providing his photographs and comments below.

This release follows on from a number of Southern locomotive produced by the ’00’ Works in the past such as: N15, 700, C, E4, I3 and 0415 Adams Radial classes (although of course some of these have now all been subsequently been announced or produced by the major manufacturers). The level of detail of these models has steadily improved over time, although is still not as high as we see from the likes of Hornby and Bachmann, or from if built carefully from kits. No other ready to run D15 exists although kits have been available in the past  from BEC and PDK

No. 463 The 00 Works ex LSWR D15 class
Tony advised: Having just taken delivery of the new 00 Works D15 loco in Southern olive green, I am pleased to say that it was extremely well packed, has a lot of weight above the driving wheels and captures the essence of Drummond’s original locomotive. As with 00 Works’ previous Southern loco (the I3 tank) the model has some interior cab detail, and wire handrails, whilst the lined olive livery is very well executed, however, this is a “limited run” RTR loco and at £280 it is not cheap; on this basis there are a number of niggles, some of which could perhaps have easily been resolved. 

A head of view by comparison with OO Works D15 left and kit built PDK version right
The moulded coal in the bunker does not look good and is not easily removable, so it will need some real coal to cover it; if real coal is not supplied, then my personal preference would be for the tender to be modelled empty. A tension lock coupling was fitted to the front of the loco and this was easily removed, although no alternative was supplied. Although the coupling rods are blackened, the wheel rims are not and look too shiny, there is no rivet detail around the boiler (which is prominent on the prototype), and although the top and bottom lamp irons are fitted, the two central ones (which should be on either side of the smoke box) are not represented; finally, brake hangars and blocks are modelled but there is no brake rigging.
Tony continued; On my particular model, the fixed loco to tender coupling was holding the front tender wheels off the track – which was easily adjusted, whilst the red cabside oval plates did not have the loco number within them. 

The understaide of the 00 Works D15
The model is fitted with a coreless motor which is new for 00 Works, and whilst it appears powerful it seems noisier than other recent release from the mainstream manufacturers, however, my biggest problem arose from the way in which the loco is wired. It has pickups on one side of the loco and on the opposite side of the tender only – so of 14 available wheels (including the front bogie) the loco only picks up from 5 –  a single wire connects the loco and tender (see picture). I spoke to Roderick Bruce at 00 Works and he described the way in which the loco was wired as “the American standard”; he also pointed out that his previous tender locos have been wired the same way.

Tony’s PDK kit built version to allow a comparison

I have since remedied this by fitting additional pick-ups to the opposite side of the loco, however, the conversation did cause me to look at my other 00 Works locos and perhaps unsurprisingly, I had noted 3 of them as being “poor runners” that I had yet to attend to. I have since fitted additional pick-ups to each and this has resolved all of the running issues, however, this does make me wonder whether it is reasonable these days to provide so few pick-ups – particularly on a 4-4-0 loco!
Once the wiring was remedied, I put the loco onto a test train consisting of 8 x Hornby Pullmans and it was able to pull away on the flat – albeit with some wheel-slip – and make good speed; once run in it may perhaps do better.

Overall I am now happy with the loco, but it needed some tweaking to get to this point. Given that there is no mainstream RTR model of the D15 available, the 00 Works model remains a good choice, because the kit-built option will cost at least double – unless you are going to build the kit yourself. Nevertheless I think it would be fair to say that there is “room for improvement”!

From my own view of the images Tony supplied and those I have seen elsewhere an area that has slightly let down the finish of the 00 Works releases in the past has been the highly visible carrier film to decals especially the numbers, although Tony’s example in SR Olive Greens looks OK I have seen that this issue still exists on their numbered releases, especially the lined BR versions.

Despite these small issues the model from 00 Works fills a niche gap in the RTR market and a with little additional detail makes a fine model. Thanks again for Tony for his pictures and comments on this model.

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This months picture…

A Drummond T14 class ‘Paddlebox’ 4-6-0 No. 30466 in early British railways livery passes Fisherton Sarum on a rake of Diagram 1774 40T ballast hoppers. The T14 is a Nucast white metakl kit and the ballast hoppers modified Lima models

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This months picture…

A Drummon L11 Class 4-4-0 is coaled at Fisherton sarum. The model is built from a Lodden white metal kit.

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This months picture…

Adams A12 Jubilee class, built from a Nu-Cast kit,  is turned at Fisheton Sarum with a Drummond M7 in the background.

Adams A12 Jubilee class, built from a Nu-Cast kit, is turned at Fisheton Sarum with a Drummond M7 in the background.

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This months picture…

Drummond 0-4-4T M7 No. 243 is one of the 6 painted in Malachite Green after the war but is one of those that were unlined, she is a repainted Hornby model. She has just shunted the ash wagon for filling by the gang.

Drummond 0-4-4T M7 No. 243 is one of the 6 painted in Malachite Green after the war but is one of those that were unlined, she is a repainted Hornby model. She has just shunted the ash wagon for filling by the gang.

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