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Posts Tagged ‘Bachmann Scenecraft’

I have spoken before in a view from the line post about my views on the need for a backscene on a layout. Even simple a plain blue or grey painted back board is better that nothing. A good backscene helps create impression of depth and finishes the overall illusion that we are trying to create with a layout. The style of presentation, on Canute Road Quay as I have utilised an excellent laser cut Tim Horn baseboard, the back and sides are an integral part of the overall baseboard module.

On Fisherton Sarum, as can be seen on many of the images on this blog, I am indebted to fellow High Wycombe and District MRS member Ron North who superbly hand painted my Salisbury based backscene. On Canute Road Quay, being a bit of an industrial dockside scene, I thought an grayish overcast sky would give a simple effect and not draw the eye too much from the layout itself. I therefore opted to use a photographic overcast grey sky from Photo ID backscene from Art Printers.

A view of the backscene looking towards to the RH corner

A view of the backscene looking towards to the RH corner. The engine shed in the rear corner is only half complete at the moment with no roof or inside wall in place.

I opted for their Premium range of Photo ID backscenes that are printed on tough Polypropylene that are stated as being waterproof,  scratch and tear resistant. They are self-adhesive, which is how I have affixed them to the primed plywood rear and sides of the layout;  but can be used without removing the backing film and applied using a non-aqueous glue if required. This has on the whole been a success, although the self adhesive backing was not quite a strong as perhaps I would have liked, but time will tell.

A vew of the backscene looking to the LH corner. the still to be completed ground cover is evident

A view of the backscene looking to the LH corner. the still to be completed ground cover is evident

On the rear right hand corner of the layout I have allowed for the backscene to curve slight rather than be an 90 degree corner to help trick the eye to not seeing a sharp corner but on the rear left hand corner due to the proximity of the high low relief warehouse building, and due to the length of the supplied Photo ID backscene I have simply left a 90 degree corner as it is less noticeable.

Although the Photo ID Sky backscene itself is just I was looking for above the mix of low relief buildings (mainly Bachman Scenecraft) , that are also positioned to form part of the backscene, it would not look right on its own in the gap between the buildings where the roadway supposedly heads off the scene.
This is due to the fact that in reality at such a location you would not simply see the sky finishing at the near horizon. I therefore initially wanted to fill the gap with a scene of a suitable warehouse style building in the near distance.
However, I was not able to find a suitable photograph of any warehouses that were taken in the right period, most images I was able find were of old warehouse as they appear now, either  to dilapidated, renovated, changed use such as apartments and or with modern items in the scene such as street furniture etc.

The orignal terranced houses Black and White image before manipulation in Photoshop

The original terraced houses Black and White image before manipulation in Photoshop

I did manage instead to locate an old black and white image of a row of terrace houses that I could manipulate within Adobe Photoshop to fill the gap and meet my needs, in fact since the addition of the low relief public house a row of terraced houses fit into the overall scene quite nicely.

The final image shaped and coloured before printing

The final image shaped and coloured before printing

The first step was to reshape slightly to both fill the gap and give the perspective I wanted; and secondly to re-colour the image including the brickwork, slates, chimney pots and windows but leaving the colours slightly muted as if being viewed from a distance.

The final image cut cutout in place on the layout next to the low relief public house

The final image cutout in place on the layout next to the low relief public house

The path and roadway have been matched as close as possible to be the same colours as applied to pathway and road on the layout itself. This was then printed onto art quality paper and carefully cut out before it will be finally affixed (as I have not yet permanently affixed it yet whilst I finish some of the scenic groundwork) to in the gap directly onto the sky backscene.

An overview of the Backscene on Canute Road Quay as it stands at the time of this post

An overview of the Backscene on Canute Road Quay as it stands at the time of this post. It still requires the ground cover to be completed

Details of the LED lighting I have used on Canute Road Quay will be the subject of a future post, as I am still experimenting with defusing the lighting slightly to enhance the overall slightly drab, overcast visual effect I ultimately want. The level of brightness at the moment is good for working under, in the photographs it should be noted the backscene appears slightly more bluish than in reality it is to eye, so watch this space for more progress.

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A weekend at home for a change has seen some progress made on my new little timesaving / timewasting project Canute Road Quay. This post brings you up to date with that progress, further buildings have been added and a start made on the inset quayside trackwork.

The 'Waterloo Tavern' has been added which is a Bachmann Scenecraft low relief building

The ‘Waterloo Tavern’ has been added which is a Bachmann Scenecraft low relief building

Firstly taking on board an excellent suggestion made by a friend and fellow Southern enthusiast Ian (Olddudders) on RMweb  of adding a pub into the scene to be somewhere to quench the thirst of, and allow some of the cash be spent on pay day of, the hardy dock workers; I have therefore sourced and added a couple more suitable Bachmann Scenecraft low relief buildings next to the bonded warehouse.

A further view of the low relief buildings including what is now a stores building

A further view of the low relief buildings including what is now a stores building

The first one being the ‘Waterloo Taven’ and another being a stores building that was originally a garage, but I have already removed the petrol pump and branding but haven’t touched up the paint work up yet. A small alleyway is between these buildings behind the gate.
I have also removed the platform from the bonded warehouses to lower them in height and also due to the fact that I am locating then facing on to a roadway rather railway line.

Work on the insert trackwork has started as well as the LCut Creative office building

Work on the insert trackwork has started as well as the LCut Creative office building

I have made a start on the inset quayside trackwork, which will represent a concrete finish once complete. Firstly I added check rails inside the running rails, by super-gluing lengths of rail to the sleepers. The first layer of 2.5mm cork has been glued down either side of the track, and also a strip added between the check rails. The next stage will be add a second layer of 1.5mm cork on top of the base layer that will also extend right up to the outside surface of the running rails totally covering the sleepers. Any gaps will be filled using filler before scribing section lines to represent the panels of concrete and expansion gaps then painting a weather concrete and weeds and such like added.

A view of the work in progress on the front quayside warehouse and loading platform

A view of the work in progress on the front quayside warehouse and loading platform

The front buildings representing a quayside office building and a larger warehouse and loading platform have also started to take shape. For these building I am using laser cut card components from LCut Creative. I have been very impressed with the quality and detail of these kits, they assemble very easily, using PVA woodglue and as they come in sections of common key dimensions they are easily adaptable to suit the location, as I have done here using a number of different kits combined to give the effect I am after.

The small engine shed and coal stage can be seen in the back corner of Canute Road Quay

The small engine shed and coal stage can be seen in the back corner of Canute Road Quay

These are currently still in sections with the upper floor of the warehouse building and the loading platform just being rested in place until I have added the internals floors and partitions, but the effect they give is starting to take shape.

In the very back corner can be seen the small engine shed with its Hornby Scaledale coal stage and Kernow Model Rail Centre SR style water crane, the shed itself is taking shape from a resin kit from Skytrex Model Railways.

I hope to make further progress over the Christmas break; with continued progress on the buildings, inset trackwork and the fixing of an overcast sky photographic backscene; and will keep you suitably posted via this blog.

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Today, 20/07/14,  Bachmann Europe celebrated its 25th anniversary this year with a trade event at their Leicestershire headquarters. Bachmann Europe was established in England during 1989. Initially its  Branchline product range consisted of models produced using the moulds of the old Palitoy ‘Mainline’ range. The Branchline range  has continued to grow and raise the standard for British outline ’00’ models.  Graham Farish was purchased by Bachmann Europe during the year 2000 and its production of British ‘N’ scale  models was also transferred to the factory of  Bachmann’s parent company Kader  in China.

Today at their celebration event they have announced the following:

Baldwin 009 loco (picture courtesy or Bachmann)

Baldwin 009 loco (picture courtesy of Bachmann)

Firstly a new venture with a foray into the narrow gauge 009 market. With a tie in to the 100th anniversary of the start of World War 1  they are to produce a Baldwin Class 10-12-D locomotive,  in four different liveries. With British factories fully committed to the war effort, the British government turned to the American manufacturer, Baldwin, to produce 495 of their 4-6-0T locomotives. To complement the new locomotives, they are  introducing a number of wagons – two covered goods and four open bogies. Both types of wagon would see service after the war in the UK and will be available in an assortment of liveries including WW1 WD Grey and Nocton Light Grey. In addition to the locomotives and wagons, Bachmann are to  introduce three Narrow Gauge station buildings based on Woody Bay Station on the former Lynton & Barnstaple Railway.

The  Branchline 00 scale range continues to grow with the introduction of a number of new products, further to the announcement last August of the ex LBSC H2 Atlantic, newly announced today are a Class 90 Electric and Freightliner FFA and FGA flat wagons. The Scenecraft range will feature: a Container Crane,to complement the Freightliner flat wagons, a Rail Milk Depot in low relief buildings and a System-Built Post-War Station based on Forest Hill in South-East London. A further locomotive announcement is being made on Tuesday 29th in conjunction with the National Railway Museum.

SECR Birdcage Stock will now be produced in N (picture courtesy of Bachmann)

SECR Birdcage Stock will now be produced in N (picture courtesy of Bachmann)

Graham Farish in ‘N’ gauge marks  the arrival of the N Class steam locomotive newly adorned in SECR Dark Grey livery and adds to its range the replicating of the SECR Birdcage coaching stock previously introduced in 00. Scenecraft in N scale, will see the introduction of the power station collection, a static caravan and low relief power signal box along with a host of new low relief shops and businesses.

At the event further information has been provided on the development status of previously announced items and I will post separately about this news in the next day or so.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Bachmann Europe team for their hospitality today in addition to wishing every future success (and maybe even more Southern models in the future!)

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Following on from the announcement by Kernow models of the London South Western Railway (LSWR) Type 3 signal box based on Boscarne Junction  back in August, I am pleased to advise following a suggestion made, that they have today announced a further commission via Bachmann Scenecraft of the LSWR style Ground frame hut that was also located at the Boscarne Junction sidings.

groundframe hut1-largeThe ‘Boscarne Ground Frame’ was located at the other end of Boscarne Exchange Sidings from the LSWR type 3 signal box already announced.
This type of ground frame ‘Hut’ / ‘shed’ / ‘cabin’ was pretty much a standard LSWR design and was also used for ground frames & other purposes throughout the system therefore its use would not be restricted to only a model of Boscarne Junction.

groundframe hut3-largeThis is a very welcome and logical extension to the Kernow Model Centre range of Bachmann Scenecraft resin buildings and together with the LSWR type 3 signal box will make a nice set or either can be deployed alone depending on the location being modelled.

The Ground Frame hut, reference 44-182Z will cost £14.99 once available (expected end of 2013) but can pre-ordered, with a £2 saving, at £12.99 from its dedicate page on the Kernow Model Centre website here.

 

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