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Posts Tagged ‘700 Class’

Originally announced by Hornby in December 2013 the ex LSWR Drummond 700 class 0-6-0 locomotive models have now arrived. I outlined the history of the class in my Talking Stock #29 Black Motors, Drummond’s 700 class here so I will not repeat the detail in this post. Click on any of the pictures below to enlarge.

The Hornby R3238 in lined SR 1920/30s black livery

The Hornby R3238 in lined SR 1920/30s black livery

The Hornby models depict the class in their superheated form.  Number 316 was modified in 1919 by Urie that changed the look of the engines including extending the smokebox, the frames, raising the boiler pitch by 9 inches and modifications to the cab design. The rest the class of the class were similarly modified and superheated in Southern Days between 1923 and 1929. Therefore it is only number 316 that could potentially be re-liveried into an authentic LSWR livery for pre-grouping modellers.

Originally paired with 13ft wheelbase tenders a number of the class gained 14ft wheel base from members of the T9 class (so that the T9s  would fit on the smaller central section turntables of the time) Hornby have correctly tooled both tender types.

So far released are the following variations:

  • R3238  No. 695 – SR lined black livery, 14ft wheel base tender, open coal rails, capuchon lip on chimney and smokebox snifting valves
  • R3239 No. 30315 – BR livery late crest, 14 ft wheel base tender and correctly no builders plate
  • R3240 No.30693 – BR livery early emblem, with 14ft wheel base tender
  • R3304 No.30316  – BR weathered livery early emblem and is the only release to date paired with 13ft wheel base tender
  • R3302 325 SR unlined black, part of 1940 Return from Dunkirk train pack, 14ft wheel base tender and with smokebox snifting valves

The first three, R3238,9 & 40 were originally announced as 2014 releases with the last two announced last December for release during this year, however all versions are now arriving together.

A front 3/4 view of No 695

A front 3/4 view of No 695, note the visible representation of the inside motion (painted red)

The model has a cast metal boiler and cab, to give weight whilst the running plate is plastic. The 3 pole motor does not have a flywheel, although there is technically space for one to have been fitted, perhaps this is a slight hangover from the Hornby ‘Design Clever’ phase, and is therefore a slight disappointment as originally from memory a 5 pole motor and flywheel was listed on the specification, which now shows on the Hornby website as being a 3 pole motor with flywheel, the motor sits neatly in the bottom of the cast boiler section driving the rear axle via a worm gear and two gear wheels. Hornby have advised that the 3 pole motor without a flywheel was a result of the narrow diameter of the boiler in which it is neatly mounted. This high position of the motor within the high pitched boiler allows for a cosmetic representation of internal valve gear on the top of the chassis block. This is a nice and welcome simple but effective addition. The external brake pull rods are nicely moulded however unusually for models these days the cross rods are omitted, nor are they supplied as separately non factory fitted parts.

A rear 3/4 view

A rear 3/4 view, this version is a 14ft wheelbase tender

Electrical pick up is through phosphor bronze wipers bearing on the rear of the wheel tyres on both engine and the tender with the wiring passing  through to the tender via the semi-permanent plug and socket, where the pickups run neatly along two grooves within the tender chassis, to an 8-Pin DCC socket.

The paint finish and level of detail is what we have come to expect from Hornby, the green lining on the SR version is particularly fine and represents the livery as applied pre 1936 when the use of the green lining was stopped in favour of unlined black (almost a shame that my version will be repainted into post war black!). On the SR version the cab side number plate is however a simple printed representation of what is in reality a cast plate.

A view of the cab detail, note the commendably thin cab sides considering they are part of the metal casting

A view of the cab detail, note the commendably thin cab sides considering they are part of the metal casting

The model has plenty of separately fitted items such as smokebox door dart (although the handles are incorrectly in the same plane and therefore would not be able to pass each other!), pipework, whistle, turned brass safety valves, reversing lever, sprung buffers and all lamp irons on both loco and tender. The level of the cab detail is excellent with again a mix of finely moulded and separately fitted items, it is neatly glazed and the cab side sheets are commendably thin considering they are cast metal. A metal fall plate is fitted to the loco and is fitted at enough of an able to allow movement through second radius curves with no issues.
The chimney is a separate moulded part to allow for the variations of chimney and tooling allows for the smokebox snifting valves fitted variants, that on some samples I have seen has led to a slight tooling slide mould line being visible on the top of the smokebox either side of the chimney. The boiler handrail knobs, like their recent J15 release, have been incorrectly mounted to be parallel to the footplate rather than positioned radially from the boiler, which is a slight let down on an otherwise excellent looking model although both issues are perhaps from a normal viewing distance not too noticeable.

A view showing the loco to tender coupling distances, normal top and close below

A view showing a comparison of the loco to tender coupling distances: standard setting top and close setting bottom

The fixed engine to tender drawbar has a close coupling setting, but unlike other models in the range this is adjusted via the removal and refitting of an interference fit pin rather than a screw. This if done often might lead to issues of it becoming loose in the future. I would also add that the pin is very tight as first supplied and does require some effort to remove. If set in the close coupling position it will prevent the model from being put back into the packaging. I found that even in the close setting the locomotive will navigate Peco Streamline medium radius curves with no issues.
The tender also has a removable plastic coal load revealing a fully detailed empty coal space below, being a plastic moulding it is, I feel, a better representation of coal than the cast metal coal load seen on some Bachmann models (although I always add real coal to my models anyway). The brake shoes on the tender are in line with the wheels rather than simply moulded as part of the frames as has been disappointingly seen on some recent Bachmann releases such as the C Class. The tender coupling does appear to protrude quite a distance from the rear of the tender and I will probably look at modifying that in due course.

A view of cab end of the tender. The 13ft wheel base tender was essentially the same just with a foot longer rear overhang from the last axle.

A view of cab end of the tender. The 13ft wheel base tender was essentially the same just with a foot longer rear overhang from the last axle.

Tender brake pull rods are supplied for the owner to fit along with a front vacuum pipe, the tender pipe being already factory fitted, and a front tension lock coupling although no representations of screw couplings are included.

Unlike some of the other recent releases the tender does not have an obvious / pre defined location for a DCC sound speaker or apertures for sound to escape. Separate tender metal weights are fitted inside the tank area and these might have to be removed for some speaker / DCC chip combinations.

Although delivery of the first three of these  models were been delayed, it has been worth the wait and these are a great addition to the fleets of Southern and Southern Region modellers alike.

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Following on from their break in tradition by announcing some of next years range at the Warley show last month today sees the announcement of their full plans for 2015, this post is a summary of the information from a Southern / BR(s) modellers perspective. The main highlight is completely new tooling to produce an S15 class 4-6-0 freight locomotive along with the 0415 Class Adams radial tank that was shown at Warley.

S15 Class

A 3D test print prior to tooling of the S15 With Flush sided tender

A 3D test print prior to tooling of the S15 With Flush sided tender

The S15 4-6-0 locomotives were first introduced by Urie on the London South Western railway in 1920, with later batches being built by the Southern Railway under Maunsell. I was able to speak with the design team at Hornby responsible for these models, last week, and handle the first 3D test print illustrated here.

A further view of the 3D test print. Note the bogies under the tender are not the final Maunsell versions

A further view of the 3D test print. Note the bogies under the tender are not the final Maunsell versions

I can confirm that they have tooled for the SR built versions (i.e. not the original ex LSWR version with the stepped footplate numbers 496 to 515) and are to produce a number of different details and variants including: both the Urie (823 to 837) flared 5000 gallon tenders, the Maunsell (838 to 847) flat sided 5000 gallon tenders complete with newly tooled bogies, and ultimately pairing with an ex King Arthur 4000 gallon 6 wheel tender (as used on the central section) and even possibly  versions of 30833 and 30837 that were paired with ex Schools class 4000 gallon tenders in 1962.

The chassis is a completely new design with a 5 pole motor, twin flywheels and tooling to accommodate the 3 different styles of driving wheels / balance weights fitted!

R3327 SR Maunsell lined olive green livery with Urie Bogie tender
R3328 BR early emblem livery with Maunsell flat sided bogie tender
R3329 BR late emblem livery with Urie Bogie tender

The actual locomotive numbers are still to be confirmed. The intention is that these should be available from around July next year.

0415 Class Adams Radial

A rear 3/4 view of the Adams radial, see the Warley post for the front on view.

A rear 3/4 view of the Adams radial, (Admas Boiler variant) see the Warley post for the front on view.

Originally introduced by Adams on the LSWR in 1882 for suburban work, three of the class became iconic by being used in the heavily graded and severely curved Lyme Regis branch lasting until 1961. It has ranked high on the various model railway wish lists over the last few years and this year has now seen R-T-R versions announced by both Hornby at Warley and also as reported here Oxford Rail. The Hornby design team advise me that they are producing both Drummond and Adams boiler versions with similar chimney variations as well to enable a wider range of livery versions to be release in the future (as the two  types of boiler were swapped between between different locos at different times).

R3333 No. 30584 in BR early emblem livery – Adams boiler
R3334 No. 30582 in BR late emblem livery – Drummond boiler
R3335 No. 488 in LSWR livery as preserved on the Bluebell Railway with Adams boiler

The intention is for these to be available by the end of 2015.

Locomotives and Train Packs

R3300 Winston Churchill funeral train pack

R3300 Winston Churchill funeral train pack

R3300 Winston Churchill funeral train pack to mark 50 years since the state funeral on 30 January 1965: comprising of Bulleid original style light pacific No. 34051 with cut down tender, in BR livery with late crest,  2 off Pullman cars ‘Lydia’, ‘Perseus’ and Pullman liveried Gangwayed Bogie Luggage Van S2464 (note existing tooling is being used for the GBL and not strictly as per the prototype van that was modified with additional windows in the centre pair of doors).

R3302 1940 Dunkirk train pack

R3302 1940 Dunkirk train pack

R3302 ‘1940 return from Dunkirk’ train pack;  comprising of a 700 class No. 325 paired with a 14ft wheelbase tender and 3 coach Maunsell low window set No. 447 comprising of 2 off four compartment brake 3rds (4059, 4061) and a composite (5149) in unlined olive green.

R3304 700 class 30316 with 13ft wheelbase tender

R3304 700 class 30316 with 13ft wheelbase tender

R3304 700 class No. 30316 correctly paired with the first appearance of brand new tooling for the 13ft wheelbase tender, in BR black livery with early emblem and weathered.

R3310 34006 Bude

R3310 34006 Bude

R3310 Bulleid original style light pacific No. 34006 ‘Bude’ with long smoke deflectors (as fitted for the 1948 locomotive exchange trials) and cut down tender (number 3262) as paired with ‘Bude’ in August 1961, in BR livery with late crest.

R3311 Schools class 30908

R3311 Schools V Class 30908 Westminster

R3311 Schools V class No. 30908 ‘Westminster’ in post August 1956 BR green livery with early crest .

Other train packs include:

  • R3340 2 Hal EMU in BR green livery with full yellow end set No. 2603
  • R3341 2 Hal EMU in BR blue livery set No. 2677
  • R1176 Eurostar Class 373 train set in brand new blue livery c/w track and controller
  • R3215 Eurostar Class 373 blue livery train pack
  • R4580 Eurostar Class 373 blue livery centre saloons coach pack

Additionally

It is not just the Southern Modellers that benefit from new tooled models as also announced is an LNER J50 0-6-0 tank. Additional new tooling for coaches announced over and above the LMS non corridor coaches shown at Warley includes 5 new all steel  K type Pullman cars:

  • R4660 K Type All Steel Pullman Third Class Kitchen Car No. 72
  • R4661 K Type All Steel Pullman Third Class Parlour Car No.  73
  • R4662 K Type All Steel Pullman Third Class Brake Parlour Car No. 79
  • R4663 K Type All Steel Pullman First Class Kitchen Car  ‘Loraine’
  • R4664 K Type All Steel Pullman First Class Parlour Car -‘Agatha’
All steel K type Pullman 'Loraine'

All steel K type Pullman ‘Loraine’

These are very fine looking models and have been produced to Hornby’s usual fine standard for Pullman cars,  using laser scanned data from surviving prototypes as well. In general though the prototypes ran on the Eastern Region,  [edit 17/12/14] with thanks to an informative comment below from Colin Watts; both Agetha and Lorrain came to the Southern Region in 1961 and were used on the Bournemouth Belle. They incorporate a new style of table lighting achieved via LEDs directly under tables rather than the previous fibre optic method, which makes assembly and dis-assembly of these coaches much easier.

Class 71

It should be noted that although this model was announced at Warley it will form part of the 2016 range.

N Gauge

It was also advised at the media briefing day last week that following the success of the Hornby International brand Arnold British 1:148 scale N gauge 5 Bell EMU that further N Gauge products are likely to be announced later in the year, so what this space.

Full 2015 range

For details on the full 2015 range see either Hornby.com or RMweb.

Hornby’s supply chain issues over the last few years are well documented and continue to cause supply issues even though new factories are now producing models, many of the 2014 releases are having to be carried over to 2015 (although recently the K1 model that was moved out to February 2015 has now appeared). Hornby have advised us that the intention is to supply all of the 2015 announcements during 2015. Stocks of the LMS horsebox and the BR 21T hopper wagon announced at Warley are already in the Hornby warehouse ready for immediate shipping in the new year. The new all steel K type Pullmans are also at a very advanced stage of development so should be available quite early on in the year whilst the LMS non corridor coaches are at the final tooling stage.

I would also like to thank members of the design team at Hornby whom have been very patient with all my questions and exclusively provided me with additional information on their SR related plans to hopefully be providing here one of the most comprehensive round ups.

Note: all pictures are courtesy and copyright of either Hornby Hobbies Ltd. or A York.

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Douglas Drummond’s first locomotive class built after his appointment as Chief Mechanical Engineer to the London South Western Railway (LSWR) in 1895 was the 30 strong 700 Class of 0-6-0 goods engines later to be widely known as ‘Black Motors’.  They were in fact very similar to a previous class of his built for the Caledonian Railway some years earlier. Eventually the class had many parts standardised with the Drummond’s later classes the M7, C8 and K10’s. such as the boiler, firebox, cylinders and motion.

Drummond 700 Class number 352 in original saturated form built from a BEC kit

Drummond 700 Class number 352 in original saturated form built from a BEC kit

Although known as the 700 class the first locomotive delivered was in fact number 687 and although originally number in sequence from 687 to 716, in 1898, numbers 702-16 were renumbered, somewhat haphazardly to make way for members of the T9 class.  Although intended as goods locomotives they could often be found on passenger turns and were allocated widely across the LSWR system with general at least five members of the class allocated to Salisbury.

The later modified Superheated version number 691 also built from BEC kit

The later modified Superheated version number 691 also built from BEC kit. The slightly stretched vertical proportions can be seen in this image.

In 1919, number 316  was modified by Urie by being superheated this changed the over look of the engines as it  included extending the smokebox, extensions to the frames,  raising the boiler pitch by 9 inches and modifications to the cab design. The rest the class of the class were similarly modified and superheated in Southern Days between 1923 and 1929. Wholesale withdrawal of the class took place in 1961 and 1962, although 30697 survived until January 1964.

Hornby's Black Motor is progressing well as can be seen from this pre-production sample

Hornby’s Black Motor is progressing well as can be seen from this pre-production sample

In model form a number of kits have been produced, with the first being a white metal version by BEC Models, as illustrated in both original and modified superheated versions left. The design of this kit unfortunately appears to be stretched in the vertical dimension giving the model a distorted look especially in and around the cab. Since then etched brass kits have also been available from the likes of Jedenco/Falcon Brass and PDK models.

A further view of the Hoornby pre-production sample (both images copyright and courtesy of A York)

A further view of the Hoornby pre-production sample (both images copyright and courtesy of A York)

In December 2013 Hornby announced as I reported here, and a subsequent update post here, that it was to produce a ready to run version of the superheated Black Motor. Pictures of the latest Engineering Prototype taken a couple of weeks ago are also shown left. The model has a cast footplate and boiler, similar to their T9 model to give weight for traction and the level of detail looks very good from what we can see so far. Hornby have also indicated that they are to produce both the 13′ and 14′ wheelbase tender versions as well.
All being well the latest availability information we have from Hornby is that they are aiming  for deliveries in October this year.

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Following the announcement by Hornby on Monday of their plans for 2014 that included an ex LSWR Drummond 700 class 0-6-0 and SR 2 Hal EMU a number of questions had been raised.

Another shot of the pre production 700 class (picture copyright and courtesy A York)

Another shot of the pre production 700 class (picture copyright and courtesy A York)

Firstly with respect to the Drummond 700 class it was noticed by a number of people, including by friend and SR aficionado Chris Knowles-Thomas via the comment function of these pages, that the locomotive number 30345 announced for the BR Black late crest variant was in fact a number for a K10 class (had it actually survived into British Railways ownership)  but number 30346 would have been correct for a 700 class (a simple typo perhaps?). There is also the question of tender types as when built all the class had 13′ wheelbase tenders but some were swapped with 14′ wheelbase tenders in 1925/6. of the number announced by Hornby 30346 (assuming it to be the number they meant) and 30694 kept 13′ wb tenders whilst 325 acquired a 14′ wb tender.

I have been in contact with Simon Kohler at Hornby to advise him of the above and he confirmed that he will check their plans in light of the information and correct where necessary.

[Edit:18/12/13: Simon Kohler has further advised they propose to change the numbers to E695, 30315 and 30693, this implies Hornby will be tooling a 14ft Wheelbase tender as all these numbers had them post 1925/6 but I am awaiting confirmation from Hornby regarding their proposed tooling.]

[Edit: 19/12/13: I can now advise that Hornby will be producing tooling for two tender types, so both 13ft and 14ft wheelbases.]

2HALc

The trailing car pick up bogies on the pre production 2 Hal (copyright and courtesy A York)

I also raised the positive fact that the new tooling for the 2 Hal included the correct trailer car pick up bogie, which was sadly missing from the previous 2 Bil releases that incorrectly used the same pick up bogie from the motor car. Simon Kohler confirmed to me that it is indeed new correct tooling and that it will also be used on the future 2 Bil releases as well as the 2 Hal.

So all in all well done Simon Kohler and Hornby!

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Hornby have today announced their 2014 range and included within it are a number of new items of interest to Southern modellers with the headline being the introduction of a Drummond 700 class 0-6-0 and 2 HAL EMU to the range. Below I summarise the releases of interest to Southern / BR(s) modellers.

The first off Engineering Prototype of the Drummond 700 Class (picture copyright and courtesy of A York)

The first off EP of the 700 Class (picture copyright and courtesy of A York)

The Drummond 700 Class 0-6-0 locomotives were built in 1897 and comprised of 30 Locomotives They were subsequently rebuilt by initially by Urie with superheaters between 1920 and 1927. Seen mainly on the ex London South Western Lines working from sheds such as Nine Elms, Guildford, Salisbury, Feltham and Exmouth Junction. They were a long lived class with the last one not being withdrawn from service until 1964.

The 2-Hal prototypes are well underway and will compliment the 2-Bil nicely (picture copyright and courtesy A York)

The 2 HAL prototypes are well underway and will compliment the 2 BIL nicely (picture copyright and courtesy A York)

The 2 HAL EMU follows on from the release last year of the 2 BIL which proved very popular and is reflected by a number of new versions being also released in 2014. Introduced in 1939 and only having one lavatory in one of the coaches rather than 1 in each were designated ‘2 HAL’ as Half A Lavatory unlike ‘2 BIL’ Bi Lavatory! Although designated as main line semi fast stock the 2 HAL’s were somewhat utilitarian compared to the 2 BIL and 4 LAV uits that preceded them, with thinly padded bench style seats rather than deep cushioned seats. Eventually totalling 92 units the 2 HAL’s were the largest type of SR main line semi fast EMU built and lasted in service until 1971.

Locomotives and Train Packs

R3108 T9 Class 4-4-0 No. 708 in SR Post 1937 black ‘Sunshine’ lettering livery, ‘watercart’ tender
R3238 700 Class 0-6-0 No. 325 in SR Pre 1931 black Livery
R3239 700 Class 0-6-0 No. 30345 (sic) [should possibly be 30346] in BR black late crest livery
R3240 700 Class 0-6-0 No. 30694 in BR black early crest livery
R3161B 2 BIL EMU in SR olive green livery (set No. TBA)
R3257 2 BIL EMU in BR(S) green with yellow warning panels (set No. TBA)
R3258 2 BIL EMU Class 401 in BR Blue full yellow ends (set No. TBA)
R3259 2 BIL EMU Class 401 in BR Blue full yellow ends, set 2090 NRM version
R3260 2 HAL EMU in SR Green (set No. TBA)
R3261A/B 2 HAL EMU Class 402 in BR(S) Green 2 variants (set No.s TBA)

 [Edit 18/12/13: Simon Kohler has advised they propose to change the numbers for the 700 Class to E695, 30315 and 30693 see update post here]

The collectors club models have a bit of a Southern theme in 2014 with the Terrier appearing as R3247 in LBSCR livery as No. 650 “Whitechapel” and R3248 in Kent and East Sussex livery as “Sutton”.  Continuing the Southern theme R3249 is Battle of Britain Class 4-6-2 No. 34070 “Manston” in BR Brunswick early crest livery.

Rolling Stock

The popular BR(s) Pull Push sets converted from Maunsell coaches makes a further welcome appearance as R4534C (set No. TBC) and the Maunsell Open 2nd R4538A is released in BR(s) livery

Following the announcement last year of new tooling for the BR Mk1 coaches in the Railroad range that are just hitting the shops now, 2014 sees the release of BR(s) versions in a higher specification range with metal wheels and working interior lights (the Railroad range will still contain the original specification style). Three BR(s) Green livery coach types will be available in the form of a Composite, Corridor 3rd and Brake third variants.

Additionally

It is not just the Southern Modellers that benefit from new tooled models as also announced are GE/LNER J15 0-6-0, LNER D16/3 4-4-0 and BR(E) K 2-6-0 classes. The Railroad range also sees new tooling in the shape of the Franco-Crosti 9F 2-10-0.

Additional new tooling for coaches announced includes BR MK2 E coaches in 3 variants, although these will use the same tooling techniques as the MK1 coaches they will be in the main range and will include versions with interior lights. The wagon range is further extended with new tooling in the shape of LNER/BR Extra Long CCT vans as both LNER and BR variants.

There will also be further developments with their DCC Railmaster / e-link and  a new low cost sound system ‘Digital Twin Track Sound’.

A further view of the 700 Class EP (picture copyright and courtesy A York)

A further view of the 700 Class EP (picture copyright and courtesy A York)

I am sure many people will be asking why Hornby are announcing new models when they have had supply chain issues over the last few years that has both delayed and prevented previously announced models from hitting the shelves. Hornby have put in place a number of new staff and suppliers to overcome these issues. It is from these new suppliers that these new models will be coming from and therefore are separate to the issues experienced and in some cases still being experienced with previous factory arrangements.

The other side of the well advanced 2-Hal EP's (picture copyright and courtesy A York)

The other side of the well advanced 2 HAL EP’s (picture copyright and courtesy A York)

This can be seen by the advanced nature of the Engineering Prototypes illustrated here. I believe we all look forward to all the supply issues being resolved as it just not just affects Hornby but manufacturers across the hobby as a whole and we all want to benefit from a robust, value for money and competitive market place.

The full range announcement can be found on the Hornby Website here or on the RMweb forum here.

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Dugald Drummond joined the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) in 1895 as Locomotive Engineer, succeeding William Adams (see my Talking Stock # 14 post here) having previously worked for the  North British Railway, London Brighton & South Coast Railway and the Caledonian Railway. His title changed to Chief Mechanical Engineer in January 1905 and he remained in this position with the LSWR until his death on 8 November 1912 aged 72.

During his time with the LSWR he was responsible for the introduction of 18 locomotive types including from the diminutive C14 class, 700’s, M7’s, a number of 4-4-0 classes including of course the renown T9 ‘Greyhounds’ class a small number of 4-6-0’s classes such as the T14’s and also a couple of railcars too. Over ten of these classes were long lived and survived well into British Railways ownership with the last of the D15 class not being withdrawn until 1956.

This post highlights some of the examples of Dougal Drummond’s 4-4-0’s  that I have models of (some of his other classes will no doubt be the subject of future posts) and can sometimes be seen running on Fisherton Sarum. Many of these these examples have been kit built.

T9 Class no. 119 from the first batch built was used by both the LSWR, SR and BR(S) for royal train duties and post 1946 was the only member of the class to be painted in lined malachite green. This is a Hornby model.

Although not his first 4-4-0 design for the LSWR, that was the C8 class, his second is probably his most well known and much loved being the T9 class known as ‘greyhounds’. First introduced in 1899 the 66 strong class had a 10′ wheel base  and a 7’4″ firebox (both 1ft longer than the C8) with 6’7″ driving wheels. once superheated during the 1920’s their performance was legendary.

T9 Class No. 729 from the second batch coupled to a 3500 gallon 6 wheel tender. Again this is a Hornby model but repainted.

The first twenty engines were built at Nine Elms between June 1899 and February 1900.  At  the same time  thirty engines were built by Dubs & Co A further fifteen engines were built at Nine Elms between December 1900 and October 1901.

T9 Class no. 312 from the final batch, note the wider cab and splashers and no secondary splasher for the coupling rods. Built from a Wills white metal kit (although Hornby have also produced the wide cab variant.

This batch were identifiable by having wider cabs and splashers which enclosed the throw of the coupling rods unlike the earlier batches with narrow cabs and separate additional smaller splashers for the rods.
Whilst most people associate this class with the Drummond 4000 gallon inside bearing ‘watercart’ tenders a number were paired to 6 wheel 3500 gallon tenders and these weere swapped about during the lifetime of the class.

K10 Class No. 389 ‘Small Hopper’ with 3500 gallon 6 wheel tender. Built from a Sharp etched brass kit

In 1901/2 Drummond introduced the K10 class known as “Small Hoppers”, a class of 40 which shared the same cylinders, boiler and firebox as the earlier C8 class but with 5’7″ driving wheels for mixed traffic duties. Like the C8 class their steaming ability was not great so they generally were kept on secondary routes.

L11 Class No. 405 ‘ Large Hopper’ with a 4000 gallon inside frame ‘watercart’ bogie tender. Built from a Loddon Models etched brass kit

1903 saw the introduction of the ‘Large Hoppers’ officially the L11 class again of 40 locomotives, these were in effect the slightly larger brother of the K10 class, still with 5’7″ driving wheels but with the same longer wheel base and firebox of the T9 class. Like the K10 they were never superheated.

1903 also saw the introduction of the 10 locos of the  S11 class essentially an adaptation of the T9, also superheated but with smaller 6′ drivers and larger  4’9″ boiler. This class was followed by the L12 class of 20 locos in 1904 that was a further adaption of S11 class with the larger boiler but higher pitched on the essentially same chassis as the T9. I am yet to add these classes to my fleet.

D15 Class No. 466. Built from a BEC white metal kit.

The final 10 Drummond 4-4-0’s introduced were  the D15 class which was a verson of the L12 class but with a longer boiler and firebox, with an overall 18″ longer wheelbase than the T9.

D15 Class No. 467 also from a BEC kit and awaiting weathering

The D15s performed exceptionally well and were put to work on the Bournemouth line run where, apparently, many drivers preferred them to the less successful Drummond 4-6-0’s designs. They latterly saw extensive use on the Portsmouth line.

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