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Posts Tagged ‘0395 class’

This months picture…

ex LSWR Adams 0395 class 0-6-0 No 3441 awaits her next pilot turn on Fisherton Sarum. She is built from a DJH white metal kit.

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This months picture…

Adams 0-6-0 0395 class number 3441 sits in the headshunt at Fisherton Sarum awaiting its next shed pilot turn. The postman is on his rounds in the background.

Adams 0-6-0 0395 class number 3441 sits in the headshunt at Fisherton Sarum awaiting its next shed pilot turn, she is built from a DJH kit. The postman is on his rounds in the background.

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This months picture…

Adams 0-6-0 0395 class number 3441 sits awaiting its next shed pilot turn. 3441 is built from a DJH kit.In the background N1 class 1822 is at the coaling stage. 1822 has been converted from a Bachmann N Class Drummond 0-4-4T M7 No. 242 is one of the 6 painted in Malachite Green after the war but is one of those that were unlined, she is a repainted Hornby model.

Adams 0-6-0 0395 class number 3441 sits awaiting its next shed pilot turn. 3441 is built from a DJH kit. In the background N1 class 1822 is at the coaling stage. 1822 has been converted from a Bachmann N Class. Drummond 0-4-4T M7 No. 242 is one of the 6 painted in Malachite Green after the war but is one of those that were unlined, she is a repainted Hornby model.

 

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William Adams was the Locomotive Superintendent of the London South Western Railway between 1878 and his retirement due to ill health in 1895. He arrived having held similar positions on the North London Railway and the Great Eastern Railway at Stratford. On the LSWR he was responsible for the introduction of 524 locomotives across 16 classes ranging from diminutive 0-4-0 B4 tanks to 4-4-0 express tender engines such as the T6 and X6 classes and the of course the 0415 class Radial tanks that achieved longevity and fame on the Lyme Regis Branch. Adams also supervised the expansion of the Nine Elms locomotive works and the transfer of the carriage and wagon works to Eastleigh (which would also later become the locomotive works as well).

Whilst many of the classes introduced were withdrawn by the 1930’s a large number survived well into British Railways ownership. This post highlights some of the examples that I have models of and can sometimes be seen running on Fisherton Sarum. All these examples have been kit built.

0395 class number 3441 built from a DJH kit and awaiting weathering

First up is the 395 Class (later 0395 class) originally a class of 70 0-6-0 tender locomotives introduced between 1881 and 1886, 20 passed onto the Southern Railway in 1923 with 18 surviving into British Railways days. Number 3441 (30577 in BR days)  pictured here was allocated to Salisbury during the 1940’s and used on shed and station pilot duties as well as shunting the west yard.  withdrawals took place from 1953 with the last being 30567 in September 1959 after 76 years of service.

A12 number 654 built from Nu-Cast kit

The A12 Class of 0-4-2 tender locomotives were first  introduced in 1887, at the time of Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee, and the class were known as ‘Jubilees’. Fifty were built at Nine Elms with a further 40 contracted out to Neilson & Co at Glasgow. For quite a diminutive engine  they were surprisingly capable on heavy excursions and troop train movements,  goods services to the west of England, Weymouth and Southampton and passenger train services in north and central Devon. All 90 entered Southern Railway service and the last of the class was not withdrawn until 1948 (although the four that survived, just, into the British Railways ownership did not gain a BR number).

T1 class number 10 built from a Craftsman kit

The 50 strong T1 class of 0-4-4 tanks were introduced in 1888 and a second batch in 1894 and were essentially a tank version of the A12 class.  The second world war prolonged the life of these engines  with 15 (from the second batch) entering BR ownership and lasting until 1951. Number 10 again was again a Salisbury based locomotive usually deployed on shed and station pilot duties.

O2 Class number 213 and mainland non pull push fitted example built from a SE Finecast kit.

The O2 class of 60 0-4-4 tank locomotives were introduced in 1889 and despite their size proved powerful and were a development of the T1 class. They were originally intended to replace the ageing Beattie tanks. They ended up generally on branch line use across the ex LSWR network although of  course off the mainland the class is most associated with their use on the Isle of Wight railways. A Ready to run model in 4mm has been commissioned by the Kernow Model Centre in both mainland, IoW and pull push versions. 

G6 Class number 237 built from a Wills (SE Finecast) kit on a re-wheeled Wrenn chassis block

Lastly for this post is the G6 class of 34 0-6-0 tank locomotives (Adams only 0-6-T design) and was based on the O2 utilising the same boiler resulting an a compact tank. A number of the class were built well after Adams retired a testimony to his design. Only 2 of the class did not make it into BR ownership although withdrawals occurred in 1951 the last member of the class survived until 1962.

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Last weekend I had the pleasure of assisting talented modeller and photographer Chris Nevard at the annual Railex show, organised by the Risborough and District MRS, with his small but stunning Brewhouse Quay layout. Although apparently  set somewhere to the north of Bath, for a while at the weekend it was either transported further South East or a couple of aging Southern locomotives must have been on loan to the brewery company of Marriott, Dent and Foster (can you spot the connection?).

A view of Brewhouse Quay at Railex with muggins at the controls. Picture courtesy and copyright Chris Nevard

It had to be one of the hottest Railex shows ever with the metal clad Stoke Manderville Stadium sports hall acting very much like slow cooker. However with the quality of the modelling on show, from both layouts and demonstrators alike, coupled to one of the best collection of the specialist model trade under one roof ensured that once again this was an excellent show and the heat was a mere slight inconvenience.

Ex London Chatham and Dover Railway, Kirtley T Class 0-6-0T number 1604 of 1891 vintage shunts on the Quay. Picture courtesy and copyright Chris Nevard

Apart from one switchblade needing a slight repair, Brewhouse Quay operated faultlessly all weekend and it was only the shaky hands of the operators (well mainly me in fact) when trying to couple either the 3 link couplings or the shunting chain that challenged the illusion a little.
One of the features of Brewhouse Quay is the working wagon turntable complete with capstan and wagons are shunted  using the chain which in 4mm scale is no mean feat, but yes it can be done, and was a popular operation with the onlookers.

Ex LSWR Adams 0395 class no. 3441 of 1883 vintage must have been specially cleaned and is seen on Brewhouse Quay away from its usual duties as a Salisbury Pilot engine.

Surprisingly within the first 10 minutes of the show opening a couple of visitors plied Chris with various bottles of  beer, one of the advantages of a brewery layout perhaps? I was starting to think we would be inundated if this continued at that rate but alas no.

We did of course have to open and sample the malty beverage, each day,  purely to ensure the correct atmospheric environmental ambiance around the layout was created you understand…

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