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Kernow Model Rail Centre have today announced three weathered OO Gauge Class 71s from DJ Models. These will be based on masters supplied by Mercig Studios which the factory in China will copy. This process has worked well with many of the previous Kernow Model Rail Centre models, such as the JIA Nacco clay wagons. These weathered versions manufactured by DJ Models are exclusive to the Kernow Model Rail Centre.

Weathered Class 71 E5002

Weathered Class 71 that will No. E5002

A limited edition of 150 of each of two green versions and 100 of the blue version, will be available costing £144.95:

Weathered Class 71 No. 71008

Weathered Class 71 that will be No. 71 008

Delivery of these models is expected later this year. It should be noted that the cost of these models will be charged in full at the time of order placement.
The images left are representative of the actual weathered finish but at this stage has been applied to standard production samples that had not been renumbered.

Further information can be found on the Kernow Model Rail Centre’s dedicated Class 71 / Class 74 webpage here.

With a nod to a lyric from the Genesis track ‘Deep in the Motherlode’ from their ‘Then there were three’ album (did I not mention before I am a bit of a Genesis geek) Fisherton Sarum is celebrating its 10th birthday (its first exhibition was in back in 2006) by heading West on Saturday 30th July to be at the Barnstaple Model Railway Club exhibition.

This one day show is organised by my friends at the Barnstaple MRC, and has gained a reputation for enticing good quality layouts to North Devon. The exhibition is being held at: Christ Church, Bear Street, Barnstaple EX32 7BU.
It is open to the public between 10.00 am and 4.00 pm
BarnstapleMRCFisherton Sarum will be in the company of some excellent layouts that I can recommend seeing  including: Portchullin (P4) a Scottish DCC layout of small coastal station, Banbury (N) a model of the real station in Oxfordshire set almost in the current day, Tidworth (00) a fictional station and yard in Networth South East era, Bratton Lane (00) a small shunting yard and Wantage Narrow Gauge Tramway (009) a narrow gauge model based upon the real location. Also a selection of traders  will be present and refreshments will be available.

Competition Time!

It is a first for my blog,  but I thought I would have a competition, as a celebration of Fisherton Sarum’s 10th birthday, for you my readers to be in with a chance to win a mint boxed and brand new Hornby R2620 Urie N15 King Arthur Class number 746 ‘ Pendragon’ in Bulleid post war malachite green livery.

This is the only version that Hornby have produced so far of their excellent N15 class model in this livery. No.  746 represents one of the first batch of the N15 class introduced by Urie between 1918 and 1923, and featured the LSWR style high arc cab roof profile, Urie style safety valves and coupled to a  5000 gallon bogie style tender. More details of the Hornby N15 models can be found here on my Talking Stock #9 post. This model R2620 was introduced as one of the first releases back in 2007 and has not been available since.

So how do you enter…

Barnstaple is not the furthest west that Fisherton Sarum has appeared, so to be in with a chance to win all you need to do is work out where Fisherton Sarum has so far made its furthest west appearance (it has been mentioned on this site before so check the archives…) and send your answer, naming the town, to me by email here, before the 28th July and I will draw at random the winner from all the correct entries during the Barnstaple Exhibition on the 30th July.

Good luck in the competition and come and say hello if you are able to get along to the show in Barnstaple on the 30th.

This months picture…

Bullied Merchant Navy class 21C14 'Nederland Line' heads a train from Plymouth towards Salisbury station

Bullied Merchant Navy class 21C14 ‘Nederland Line’, built from a Millholme kit, heads a train from Plymouth towards Salisbury station.

Kernow Model Rail Centre have today announced that they have been working with Bachmann to produce the Southern Region 4-TC unit, also known as class 491 and later class 438,  that were usually propelled by 4 REP EMUs, Class 33/1s and also Class 73s, Class 74s and other compatible 1951/57/63 built EMUs. Although the 4-TCs were un-powered the Southern Region regarded them as Electric Multiple Units.

The first Engineering Sample of the Kernow model Rail Centre 4-TC

The first Engineering Prototype sample of the Kernow model Rail Centre 4-TC

This model, although based on the existing Bachmann Mk1 design, actually required three totally new tools to produce the four car unit along with their correct bogies and therefore is the equivalent of tooling three completely new locomotives. Despite this Kernow Model Rail Centre have managed to keep the price of the unit to £289.95, which is reduced to £269.95 if you place a pre-order before the model leaves China.

The first Engineering Prototype (EP) sample has been received and a few tweaks are required, such as moving the headlight to the correct position and re-configuring the wiring to allow the unit to be connected in the correct formation.

Another view of the first EP of the 4-TC

Another view of the first EP of the 4-TC

The units will feature working internal lights and the head and tail destination blinds also illuminate. Separate connecting doors are provided to give variations in headcodes, similar to the previous Bachmann 4-CEP. The unit is wired throughout using connectors similar to the Bachmann Blue Pullman, which allows full electrical connectivity while also allowing relatively easy uncoupling when required.

A side on view of the first EP of the 4-TC

A side on view of the first EP of the 4-TC

Switches below the unit allow the internal lights to be switched on or off, and also allow for independent switching of the destination blinds at the front and rear of the unit. The model is fitted with a 21 Pin DCC Decoder socket and also has provision for DCC Sound fitting. One decoder is required for DCC operation and is fitted within the luggage compartment of the Trailer Brake Corridor Second (TBSK) vehicle. The switching arrangements for internal unit lighting are replicated for DCC and can all be controlled from the single decoder.

Initially six liveries will be produced, with delivery expected to be around January 2017:

The 4-TCs were converted from Mk1 loco-hauled coaches, with 31 units converted in 1966-7 by British Rail Engineering at York Works. Initially 28 x 4 car units were created with 3 x 3 car units. The four car units were formed Driving Trailer Second Open (DTSO), Trailer First Corridor (TFK), Trailer Brake Corridor Second (TBSK) and Driving Trailer Second Open (DTSO). The 3 car units omitted the TFK. Summer services to Weymouth were frequently overcrowded so in 1974 a further 3 x 4 car units were converted and at the same time the 3 car units had a TFK inserted to make them up to 4 car units.

4-TC Unit number 416 in BR Blue livery with small yellow warning panels and etched BR logos as per model 32-640Z

4-TC Unit number 416 in BR Blue livery with small yellow warning panels and etched BR logos as per model 32-640Z

When the route from London Waterloo to Bournemouth was electrified in 1967 there was insufficient funds to complete the electrification of the route through to Weymouth. An alternative method of operation was designed with high-powered Class 430 4-REP units propelling one or two 4-TC units from Waterloo to Bournemouth. At Bournemouth the 4-REP would be detached and a Class 33/1 Diesel Locomotive would be attached at the Weymouth end to haul either one or two 4-TCs through to Weymouth. In the reverse direction the 4-TCs would be propelled from Weymouth to Bournemouth where the 4-REP would then haul the 4-TCs to Waterloo, leaving the Class 33/1 at Bournemouth to await the next Weymouth service.

4-TC unit number 8022 in BR Blue and Grey livery with Network SouthEast branding as per model 32-642Z

4-TC unit number 8022 in BR Blue and Grey livery with Network SouthEast branding as per model 32-642Z

The usual area of operation of these versatile units was between London Waterloo and Weymouth, although they could frequently be seen throughout the South Western division of the Southern Region. Regular duties included the Kenny Belle peak shuttle service between Kensington Olympia and Clapham Junction. They were also used extensively on West of England line duties between Yeovil and Salisbury to London Waterloo and between Reading and Portsmouth Harbour. Until the closure of the Swanage branch they worked on through trains from London Waterloo.

4-TC unit number 410 in BR Blue livery with half yellow ends Premier Charter with etched BR logos as per model 32-644Z

4-TC unit number 410 in BR Blue livery with half yellow ends Premier Charter with etched BR logos as per model 32-644Z

Railtours saw the units make trips to varied locations throughout British Rail, including Birmingham, Cardiff, Meldon and Barnstaple.
With the electrification of the entire Weymouth line complete by 1988, along with electrification of other South Western division routes, the need for the 4-TCs was removed and most were withdrawn by 1990. Two units were retained and repainted in original blue livery, albeit with larger yellow warning panels, with the intention to use them for “Premier Charters”, a role which they performed until 1994.

Chris Trerise, Managing Director of Kernow Model Rail Centre, said “When I first left Cornwall to work for British Rail I was based at London Waterloo and was immediately fascinated by the Southern and the variety of units in operation.  The 4-TC has always been a favourite of mine and there was never any doubt that Bachmann would produce a model to be proud of.  This is probably the largest project we have embarked on but our team work very closely with Bachmann and this has made the entire process very enjoyable.  We are really looking forward to receiving the painted samples!”

All images on this page are courtesy of and copyright of Kernow Model Rail Centre / Chris Trerise.

With again a respectful nod to the Southern Publicity Department  back in 1936 I am soon heading very South (well about 4 and bit  hours and approximately 1600 miles in a plane south) for a blend of Spanish, African and Latin American influences,  exploration including a dormant volcanoes and a lava scape, rest, relaxation and hopefully some sun, possibly dark sandy beeches and sea too (might help you guess where). There will as a result be a break in posts (with the exception of a Southern Region related, tip top.., announcement Friday next week)  in my humble corner of the interweb and blogospehre, with normal service being resumed week commencing the 27th June.

summer posterThe now famous Southern Railway publicity poster  ’I’m Taking and Early Holiday cos I know Summer Comes Soonest in the South’, was first released in 1936. It was dubiously parodied later by the Late and Never Early Railway, imitation being… etc. etc.

The Photograph, originally in black and white, was  taken in 1924 by Charles E Brown and shows a small boy carrying a suitcase on the platform at Waterloo station talking to the fireman of N15 King Arthur class 4-6-0 locomotive No 755 ‘The Red Knight’, as he leans from the cab. The Southern Railway publicity department had the image coloured for use on this poster the hint of the black and white original can be seen beyond the locomotive.

I know this post is a cheat, as this is a repeat of a similar post from last summer and possibly even the summer before then, but firstly I am already in holiday mode and secondly I do like the poster. If you are also about to head off on vacation or have one planned over the summer months then enjoy!

Just in case you get withdrawal symptoms feel free to click here to view a totally random post.

This months picture…

Fisherton Sarum

H16 class 4-6-2T tank No. 519, built from a Falcon Brass kit is turned at Fisherton Sarum. She must have been borrowed on a freight turn from Feltham. N1 class 1822 passes by on a ballast train in the background.

For those of us as either members and, like myself, shareholders of the 35006 Locomotive Society yesterday 16th May 2016, was a very special day. Following restoration from an ex Barry condition, at the Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway, that has taken over 30 years Bulleid Merchant Navy Pacific 35006 Peninsular & Oriental S. N. Co. (the longest name of any locomotive in preservation) was officially renamed and hauled her first passenger train for over 50 years comprising of members and shareholders of the 35006 Locomotive Society along with a small number of invited honoured guests.

35006 in the sunshine at the Gloucester and Warwickshire Railway folowing her first passenger run on 16th May 2016 for Society Members and Shareholders

35006 in the sunshine at the Gloucester and Warwickshire Railway following her first passenger run on 16th May 2016 for Society Members and Shareholders

35006 was withdrawn in her prime in August 1964, before languishing in the infamous Dia Woodham Barry scrapyard for over 18 years. A small band of dedicated early pioneers of the 35006 Locomotive Society managed to scrape together the purchase price of just over £7000 which resulted in 35006 finally leaving for Toddington on the Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway in March 1983.

My Dad films 35006 moving into place prior to renaming ceremony

My Dad records 35006 moving into place prior to renaming ceremony

Over 30 years of dedication, hard work and fundraising by members of the growing  35006 Locomotive Society finally saw 35006 steam again, albeit on 2 cylinders, on 10th August 2015. Following completion of the final list of works required, further steaming and running in, the date was set for her renaming and first passenger run on Monday 16th May 2016.

The first 35006 Locomotive Society Chairman Bill Trite reflects on the very early days of obtaining 35006

The first 35006 Locomotive Society Chairman Bill Trite reflects on the very early days of obtaining 35006

The unveiling / renaming of Peninsular & Oriental S. N. Co. was carried out by Pete Waterman the President of the Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway following short speeches by current Society Chairman, Jon McMillan, who introduced the first Society Chairman and pioneer Bill Trite (who subsequently went on to be Chairman of the Swanage Railway and Southern Locomotives Ltd.),

Ex Fireman David Brown fired 35006 on her final turn in 1964

Ex Fireman David Brown fired 35006 on her final turn in 1964

Bill described to the audience those early days of making the necessary small but important steps of raising the initial funds to both purchase and secure a base for and moving 35006 to Toddington and therefore reaching where the Society is at today.

Pete Waterman unveils the nameplate of Peninsular & Oriental S. N. Co.

Pete Waterman unveils the nameplate of Peninsular & Oriental S. N. Co.

The final speaker before Pete Waterman unveiled the nameplate was former Southern Region Fireman, David Brown who was based at Yeovil.
David described how, as a 18 year old, he fired 35006, in August 1964 on the night mail coming off the train at Salisbury before going onto shed, 35006 was unusual in that she spent her entire career at Salisbury 72B shed, to be told that she was now to be withdrawn and he had just fired her final turn in service. David was then invited to be on the footplate, along with Pete Waterman on the first run of the day.

35006 then completed two runs between Toddington and Cheltenham Racecourse with an impressive twelve coach rake (unfortunately not in Southern Region green but you cant have everything!), not often seen on the Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway as they usually only run seven coach trains, which she handled with ease.

35006 runs around the 12 coach train at Cheltenham Racecourse

35006 runs around the 12 coach train at Cheltenham Racecourse

A very nice complimentary lunch was served on board the first run, which was quite an achievement in itself by the catering team from the Flag and Whistle franchised café run by Lynne Tidddy and her enthusiastic team.

It was certainly a fantastic day, the sun shone, 35006  looked, performed and sounded great.
35006 also carried a small plaque on the middle bufferbeam lamp bracket to mark the Society having received, earlier this year, the Heritage Railway Association’s John Coiley Award for the restoration of 35006.

The 35006 Locomotive Society should be duly proud of their achievement in all aspects of the restoration, fundraising and also the organisation of the day itself.

35006 pulls away from Cheltenham Racecourse in the sunshine

35006 pulls away from Cheltenham Racecourse in the sunshine

I would like to take this opportunity thank the 35006 Locomotive Society on behalf of all its members and  shareholders for such a great day. A further note of thanks should be made for the wonderful complimentary full colour commemoration booklet charting the three decades of restoration.

If reading about this achievement has, and I hope so, made you feel like you would like to be a part of keeping 35006 in steam, then information on how to join the Society can be found here.

35006 will be making her first appearance hauling trains for the public at the Cotswold Festival of Steam on the Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway over the May 28th to 30th Bank Holiday weekend. 

 

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