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Ok it is not the proper Atlantic Coast Express , but I’m off for a much welcome summer break to a lovely island where the main airport code is coincidental ACE! Anywho, before I depart for some sun, sea, volcanoes and relaxation I will also leave you with a photo review and few very quick initial thoughts on the new Dapol ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0t in 00

Merchant Navy 21C6 complete with ACE headboard on Fisherton Sarum

The Atlantic Coast Express was probably the most misnamed of all the Southern Railway named trains but was a stroke of genius at the same time. Why misnamed you might ask, well of the ten different termini served by the train there was only one that was actually on the Atlantic Coast itself!  The genius of the name, however, a result of a competition run in the Southern Railway staff magazine in 1924 credited to Guard F. Rowland* of Woking, was its simple initials ‘ACE’.

Moving on to the Dapol ex LSWR Adams B4 0-4-0t, first announced in March 2014  it has now hit the retailers.

Dapol B4 No. 88

My immediate first impression is that the model is quite light, certainly lighter than recent small tank releases such as the Horny Peckett and the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay. Despite the lack of weight they have run nicely albeit briefly on Canute Road Quay.

A rear 3/4 view of No. 88

The B4s were not a large class but as usual were a minefield of subtle and not so subtle variations over time such as: cabs, boilers, chimneys and buffers.

A view of BR late crest version No. 30096. Note the larger buffers (none are sprung) and different style cab

Dapol have tooled for some of these variations but have also managed at first glance to achieve a few errors including: possibly the number of boiler bands, variation combinations not appropriate to the particular livery (such as buffer head sizes), missing injector, missing front middle lamp iron (as fitted to some prototypes at the base of the smokebox door) and the cab ventilation holes just under the roof line front and rear are raised mouldings rather than actual holes (a possible translation from CAD to tool issue).

B4s No. 30089 and 30096 front comparison

I also note that on the BR livery version the smokebox door number plate is unusually completely a transfer rather printing on a moulded or an etched plate (although this may possibly be an advantage to those like me that will be repainting into an earlier livery).

Rear cab comparison between No. 30096 and 30089

There is also a pronounced joint line apparent around the front of the smokebox.

Electrical Pick ups are, as you would expect and indeed necessary, wipers on all the rear of four wheels with an open slew wound five pole motor (rather than now more common can motors) driving the rear axle via a flywheel and gear tower.

A trio of B4s

It also features a firebox glow which is quite dim, especially at low speeds on DC but might appear consistently brighter on DCC. No separate items are supplied for the owner to fit, with thee exception of a  unique very wide replacement tension lock coupling bar, but I am not convinced it will work well in conjunction with the lightly sprung close coupling NEM pocket.

Despite the initial comments above, I am sure the Dapol B4 will still be popular with most SR modellers and from normal viewing distances looks ok and runs well.

Normal service of posting will be back in a couple of weeks, with perhaps more on the B4 and also some views of the Heljan 07.

 *footnote, it is unfortunate to record that Guard Roland although based at Woking at the time of the competition moved shortly after to Torrington (one of the ACE’s destinations) but sadly just six years later became the only person to killed on the North Cornwall Railway due to a shunting accident.

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Following on from the release earlier this year of their delightful SECR P Class 0-6-0t Hatton’s have today announced that four new versions of the SECR P Class will soon be available. Based on feedback from the modelling community, Hatton’s will be producing extra SECR lined green and BR liveries, with new running numbers; and for the first time they will produce two ROD (Railway Operating Division) locomotives.
Production sample locomotives have been approved and they are on the way to their store now.

The four new versions of the Hatton’s P Class

The four new variants are:

  • H4-P-013 – 5027 in ROD green
  • H4-P-014 – 5753 in ROD green
  • H4-P-015 – 27 in SE&CR full lined green (with polished brass)
  • H4-P-016 – 31556 in BR black with early emblem

ROD Version No. 5027

The ‘ROD’ liveried P Classes were sent to Boulogne for a few years during WW1 for shunting at dockyards. On return to the UK, they were also seen working at Dover and Folkestone. These WW1-era locos will be perfect for a variety of UK or continental wartime layouts.

SECR Livery version No. 27

The SECR liveried locomotive will feature a new colour for the polished brass dome and safety valve. The new colour represents polished brass, which is halfway between our original release of P Classes 178 & 753; and Hornby’s H Class.

The new locomotives will be available on Friday 17th August 2018 for the same price of £99. All four are available to pre-order from Hatton’s now!

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Model Rail Magazine in cooperation once again with Canadian manufacture Rapido Trains, (their previous collaboration the ex GER J70 is close to delivery) is to be producing the LBSCR Class E1 0-6-0T. Officially being announced with the publication date of the July issue No. 249 of their magazine on June 7th, however with  subscriber copies now having been delivered the information is in the public domain.

E1 Class as currently on the Isle of Wight steam railway, masquerading as W2. Originally B110 and sold to industrial use in 1927

With the exception of the final six built in 1891 under the auspices of RJ Billington with different boiler, dome and chimney known as E1s from new, the rest of the 80 strong class were originally introduced by William Stroudley from 1874 as the E Class. Essentially a larger goods version of the A1 Terrier 0-6-0t, using the same cylinders, motion and boilers as the D Class 0-4-2 passenger tanks. Later all the E Class were reclassified as E1s.

E class 686 in LB&SCR livery. Picture courtesy and copyright Mike Morant collection

Although most of the class worked on the Brighton section some were used In Southampton Docks, so ideal for Canute Road Quay, and on the Isle of Wight. Ten members of the class were converted between 1927 and 1929 to become E1/R Class 0-6-2t with new cabs, extended bunkers and the addition of a Radial axel for use in the West Country.

E1 class 2506 in post war’Sunshine’ black livery. Picture courtesy and copyright Mike Morant collection

Although withdrawals started as early as 1913 many passed into British Railways ownership with the last surviving to 1960. Four members of the class ended up being sold into industrial colliery use, including the one preserved example B110 now located on the Isle of Wight steam railway.

The initial Model Rail Magazine versions to be available, during 2020, are as follows:

  • MR-401  97 – LBSCR Stroudley Improved Engine Green
  • MR-402  127 – LBSCR Stroudley Goods Green
  • MR-403  B96 – Marsh umber but with ‘B’ prefix as applied by SR
  • MR-404  2142 – SR black (pre-War)
  • MR-405  2606 – SR black, ‘sunshine’ lettering
  • MR-406  32151 – BR lined black, no emblem
  • MR-407  32113 – BR plain black, early emblem
  • MR-408  32689 – BR plain black, early emblem (weathered)
  • MR-409  W2 – SR (IoW) lined green
  • MR-410  W4 – BR (IoW) black, early emblem

They will be available soon to be pre-ordered via the Model Rail Offers website managed by the Kernow Model Rail Centre.

Full details of the specification to follow.

Also announced by Model Rail Magazine, also via Rapido Trains is the BR(w) 0-6-0 16xx Class pannier tanks.

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The small manufacturer of Ready To Run locomotive 00 Works announced back in May 2017 their intention to produce a batch of ex LSWR Drummond 4-4-0 D15s  A number of the versions have now arrived from 00 Works, although as with many of their releases I have not personally ordered one myself (I already have a couple of kit built examples,  that can be seen here in my Talking Stock #17 post along with some further details on the prototype) I am indebted to friend and fellow Southern modeller Tony Teague for once again providing his photographs and comments below.

This release follows on from a number of Southern locomotive produced by the ’00’ Works in the past such as: N15, 700, C, E4, I3 and 0415 Adams Radial classes (although of course some of these have now all been subsequently been announced or produced by the major manufacturers). The level of detail of these models has steadily improved over time, although is still not as high as we see from the likes of Hornby and Bachmann, or from if built carefully from kits. No other ready to run D15 exists although kits have been available in the past  from BEC and PDK

No. 463 The 00 Works ex LSWR D15 class
Tony advised: Having just taken delivery of the new 00 Works D15 loco in Southern olive green, I am pleased to say that it was extremely well packed, has a lot of weight above the driving wheels and captures the essence of Drummond’s original locomotive. As with 00 Works’ previous Southern loco (the I3 tank) the model has some interior cab detail, and wire handrails, whilst the lined olive livery is very well executed, however, this is a “limited run” RTR loco and at £280 it is not cheap; on this basis there are a number of niggles, some of which could perhaps have easily been resolved. 

A head of view by comparison with OO Works D15 left and kit built PDK version right
The moulded coal in the bunker does not look good and is not easily removable, so it will need some real coal to cover it; if real coal is not supplied, then my personal preference would be for the tender to be modelled empty. A tension lock coupling was fitted to the front of the loco and this was easily removed, although no alternative was supplied. Although the coupling rods are blackened, the wheel rims are not and look too shiny, there is no rivet detail around the boiler (which is prominent on the prototype), and although the top and bottom lamp irons are fitted, the two central ones (which should be on either side of the smoke box) are not represented; finally, brake hangars and blocks are modelled but there is no brake rigging.
Tony continued; On my particular model, the fixed loco to tender coupling was holding the front tender wheels off the track – which was easily adjusted, whilst the red cabside oval plates did not have the loco number within them. 

The understaide of the 00 Works D15
The model is fitted with a coreless motor which is new for 00 Works, and whilst it appears powerful it seems noisier than other recent release from the mainstream manufacturers, however, my biggest problem arose from the way in which the loco is wired. It has pickups on one side of the loco and on the opposite side of the tender only – so of 14 available wheels (including the front bogie) the loco only picks up from 5 –  a single wire connects the loco and tender (see picture). I spoke to Roderick Bruce at 00 Works and he described the way in which the loco was wired as “the American standard”; he also pointed out that his previous tender locos have been wired the same way.

Tony’s PDK kit built version to allow a comparison

I have since remedied this by fitting additional pick-ups to the opposite side of the loco, however, the conversation did cause me to look at my other 00 Works locos and perhaps unsurprisingly, I had noted 3 of them as being “poor runners” that I had yet to attend to. I have since fitted additional pick-ups to each and this has resolved all of the running issues, however, this does make me wonder whether it is reasonable these days to provide so few pick-ups – particularly on a 4-4-0 loco!
Once the wiring was remedied, I put the loco onto a test train consisting of 8 x Hornby Pullmans and it was able to pull away on the flat – albeit with some wheel-slip – and make good speed; once run in it may perhaps do better.

Overall I am now happy with the loco, but it needed some tweaking to get to this point. Given that there is no mainstream RTR model of the D15 available, the 00 Works model remains a good choice, because the kit-built option will cost at least double – unless you are going to build the kit yourself. Nevertheless I think it would be fair to say that there is “room for improvement”!

From my own view of the images Tony supplied and those I have seen elsewhere an area that has slightly let down the finish of the 00 Works releases in the past has been the highly visible carrier film to decals especially the numbers, although Tony’s example in SR Olive Greens looks OK I have seen that this issue still exists on their numbered releases, especially the lined BR versions.

Despite these small issues the model from 00 Works fills a niche gap in the RTR market and a with little additional detail makes a fine model. Thanks again for Tony for his pictures and comments on this model.

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Hatton’s only announced their production of the ex SECR Wainwright P Class tanks after first Engineering Prototypes had been received back in September last year as I reported in my “Can I have a P please” post, here. Although it was hoped to be able to deliver these before the end of last year Hattons should be congratulated in getting 10 of the 12 initially announced versions to the market last week, a refreshingly short process time especially as this is the first locomotive project that Hatton’s have handled direct with the manufacturing company in China. The two SECR lined livery versions will be following shortly.

A side on view of No. 1558

Although only eight P class locomotives were built, there were a number of differences between the members of the class and during their lifetime and Hatton’s have certainly risen exceptionally well to the challenge.

The separately applied items are clear here on No. 1558

The first two members of the class introduced in February 1909 numbers 753/556/1556/31556 and 754/557/1557/31557 had 4 and half inch taller cabs and side tanks than the remaining six members that were built in February and July 1910. Although only a small difference in height it is noticeable when the locos are side by side.

A rear 3/4 view of No. 1555 (which will become 31555 in 1948 livery)

Hatton’s have tooled for both cab / tank height styles, the two different smokeboxes with different rivet patterns, two main types of buffers, alternative rear steam heating pipes, smokebox lubricators, number plates (where applicable) and with or without glazing bars on the rear cab spectacles.

The first 12 version announced by Hatton’s are as follows:

  • H4-P-01 No. 178 in SECR lined green, 1910-11 (as preserved) short cab, SR Buffers, smokebox with 1 row of rivets and lubricator
  • H4-P-02 No. 753 in SECR lined green, 1909-11 (as preserved) tall cab, SR Buffers, rear window bars, smokebox with 2 rows of rivets and lubricator
  • H4-P-03 No. 754 in SECR wartime grey, 1910-1920s, tall cab, Bottle buffers, higher steam pipes and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-04 No. A325 in Southern Railway lined olive green, 1924 to mid 1930s, short cab, bottle buffers, rear window bars, higher steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-05 No. 1555 in Southern Railway black, 1938-48, short cab, bottle buffers, rear window bars, higher steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-06 No. 1558 in Southern Railway black with Sunshine lettering, 1941-48, short cab, bottle buffers, rear window bars, higher steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-07 No. 31027 in BR black with early emblem, 1949 to withdrawal in 1961, short cab, SR buffers, rear window bars, higher steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-08 No. 31323 in BR black with late crest, 1959-61, short cab, SR buffers, rear window bars and smokebox with 1 row of rivets
  • H4-P-09 “Pioneer II” in Bowaters Paper Mill lined green, 1958-61 (ex 178/1178/31178) short cab, SR buffers, no vacuum pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-10 “Pride of Sussex” in Robertsbridge flour mill green, 1961-71, (ex 53/556/1556/31556), tall cab, SR buffers, no steam pipe and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-11 No. 27 “Primrose” in Bluebell Railway lined black, 1961-63, short cab, SR buffers, rear window bars and smokebox with 2 rows of rivets
  • H4-P-12 No. 323 in Bluebell lined blue (as preserved) short cab, SR buffers, lubricator and smokebox with 1 row of rivets

A 3./4 rear view of No. 754 in SECR war time grey note no glazing bars on the rear cab spectacles. (which will become No. 1557 in SR post war black livery)

The model is supplied in a Hatton’s branded sturdy foam lined box and further protected by the now common up and over plastic tray in a plastic sleeve. It should be noted that this outer sleeve is a very tight fit so care should be taken trying to access the model. I also positively note that packing allows for the tension lock couplings to remain in place.

Four and half inches does not equate to much in 4mm scale but as can be seen it is just noticeable with the high cab to the right on 754

Hopefully the pictures of three of the models with in this post will speak for themselves. I am certainly very impressed with the build quality (although on  the rear sprung buffers was loose on one of my examples), finesse and level of separately applied details such as: fine blackened handrails, detailed cab interior,  drain cocks, oil lubricators, brass whistle, lamp irons front and rear, smokebox number plate (i.e. not moulded) on BR versions.

A 3/4 front view of No. 1558

An accessory bag of further detaining parts is provided that contains: buffer beam coupling hooks with cosmetic screw link couplings, steam heating pipes of a type relevant to the livery of the loco, 3 off SR Engine Head Signal discs (referred to incorrectly as “Route Indicator Disks” within the supplied instruction sheet) an SR style lamp and what  must be a first for an R-T-R model 3 off tiny oil cans!

The Sunshine style lettering also incorrectly includes the inner black line within the numerals (click to enlarge)

The livery application is very crisp and a nice stain finish, very much as we have come to expect from current R-T-R models. Manufacturers build plates and the SECR ownership plates (where applicable) are printed rather than separate etched items. I have however spotted that the SR post war black version the ‘Sunshine’ numerals are incorrect in that they should not have the inside black line as this was only applied to the ‘Southern’ lettering.

A view into the cab showing the printed dials

Within the cabs the various gauges are part of the spectacle glazing insert they have dials / needles nicely printed on them although the moulding also has the copper pipe runs to these gauges but have been left unprinted / painted.

With its 5 Pole motor within the boiler and gearbox within the firebox (allowing the daylight gap under the boiler), boiler weights and all wheel pick up the performance is smooth and reliable at all speeds. A 6 pin DCC socket is included, accessed by the removal of the body, simply achieved via the four screws located on the underside either side of the NEM coupling pockets. Not surprisingly in a model of such small prototype sound fitting will be a slight challenge requiring some modelling skills but helpfully Hatton’s have suggested a process for achieving this within the supplied instruction sheet.

Canute Road Quay could occasionally be relocated further South East ..

My No. 1558 will be simply weathered, whilst No. 1556 will be changed to one of the current missing livery options as her later early 1948 identity of No.31556 with ‘British Railways’ in SR Sunshine lettering style, whilst tall cab No. 754 will become her later 1557 identity in SR post war black as per No. 1558.  As there are still possibly two or three some other livery versions possible some of these might yet appear so watch this space.

In conclusion  as I am sure you can tell Hatton’s have produced and excellent model and with the number of versions announced should be very popular for modellers of the South East from all periods including the preservation era.

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Rails Limited in partnership with Dapol and the National Railway Museum announced at this weekends London Festival of Railway Modelling that they will produce the LBSC Terrier and all its subsequent variants in OO Gauge.

With all the experience Dapol has gained from making the award winning O Gauge version of the A1 / A1X Terrier it is fully anticipated that this project will progress very quickly. Decorated samples are expected to be available Autumn 2018.

Initially six livery versions will be available in DCC ready, DCC and DCC Sound fitted:

  • A1X No. 32655 in BR lined black with early crest
  • A1 No. 82 Boxhill in LBSC Stroudley improved engine green.
  • A1 Bodiam in KESR Blue
  • A1X No. 751 in SECR lined green
  • A1X No. 2644 in Southern post 1931 lines Olive Green
  • A1X No. 32661 in BR lined black with late crest

The tooling will allow eventually for most variations of the A1, A1X and IOW variants of the locomotive to be produced, including two cab/bunker types, two smokebox/boilers. Wooden and metal brake rigging where appropriate.

The announced specification includes:

  • Diecast chassis and running plate
  • Detailed plastic moulded body
  • Many separately fitted parts
  • Diecast wheels with sprung centre driving wheels to give compensation providing all wheel electrical pick up and better traction
  • DCC and sound Ready with easy access through a removable body which exposes a NEXT-18 socket
  • DCC and DCC Sound Fitted variants using Dapol’s own sound recording of 32678 on the Kent and East Sussex Railway
  • Powerful 5 pole skew wound motor
  • Factory sound fitted locomotives will feature RealDrive braking control

Pricing has been announced as being £110.00 each (DCC Ready), DCC Fitted Versions £140 / DCC Sound Versions £239 with pre ordering being recommended and secured with a £30 deposit.

These models will superceed the now much long in the tooth and slightly hybrid Dapol / Hornby Model. Full details can be found on the Rails website here

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Hornby first announced their intention to produce, as part of their 2017 rang,e the ex SECR Wainwright H class 0-4-4t back in September 2016 The first models, the SECR livery version,  duly arrived  October 2017 followed by the BR late crest lined black version in December 2017. I have now received my own model No. 1324 in SR olive green, hence me only just officially reviewing the model now.

A side view of R3540 in SR livery as 1324

The first 64 of the eventual 66 members of the class were first introduced by Wainwright of the South Eastern and Chatham Railway between November 1904 and 1909. The final two members of the class were eventually built under the auspices of Maunsell in 1915! They first appeared in Wainwright’s fully lined dark green livery followed by by Maunsell’s plain dark green livery, then the wartime dull grey livery up until 1923. In Southern Railway days they were in lined olive green which gave way for most members of the class to Bulleid black under wartime conditions and eventually British Railways lined black.
All but two members of the class (numbers 1264 & 1312 due to cracked frames) entered British Railways service with withdrawals taking place initially between 1951 and 1953 as a result of the spread of electrification and the remainder between 1959 and 1964.  A large number of the class were fitted with standard SR air control Pull Push gear from 1949 onwards to replace some of the aging D3, R &  R1 0-4-4 tanks. There were a number of slight differences within the class such as steam and Westinghouse braked versions, slight variations in coal and water capacities, while fifteen of the class had straight sided rather than flared topped coal bunkers.

A front 3/4 view of No. 1324

Hornby announced four versions as part of their 2017 range:

  • R3538 No.308 in fully lined SECR green livery
  • R3539 No. 31518 in lined BR black with late crests and, correctly, OHLE warning flashes and pull push fitted
  • R3540 No 1324 in SR Olive green livery (Post 1931 i.e. number changed from A324 to 1324)
  • R3512 No. 31551 in BR lined black with late crest as part of a train pack with Maunsell Pull Push iset  No. 602, comprising coach nos.1318 and 6681

As part the range for 2018 announced Hornby are to produce R3631 as 31265, representing one of the 15 members of the class with flat side bunkers (which is revised tooling new for 2018), in BR lined black with early crest. A further versions is being produced during 2018 as a limited edition for Hornby Collectors club members as R3648 No. 263 as she is persevered on the Bluebell Railway. It should be noted that No. 263 when introduced, in May 1905, she was one of the fifteen members of the class with flat sided bunkers and fitted with early type pull push gear. Sometime before withdrawal, by BR in January 1964, she was fitted with a version of the flared bunker style (not quite matching the rest of the class, see if you can spot the difference) and she has retained the style bunker in preservation.

A rear 3.4 view of No. 1324

Hornby have included within  their tooling the ability to produce a number of options including smokebox rivet style, steam and Westinghouse braked versions, flat and flared bunker sides along with those fitted with air control pull push gear and its associated small bore air control pipework down one side of the running plate.

The model is fitted with pick ups on all wheels (although some have found those on the bogie require a little adjustment to function correctly),  a five pole motor and brass flywheel and incorporates an 8 pin DCC socket. Body removal is quite simple, requiring the removal of four screws, however those wishing to a fit sound a small speak can be located within the bunker but this will require a little more complex dismantling of the body. Included with the model is an accessory / detail pack containing brake rodding, hand brake linkage, small NEM tension lock couplings and buffer beam pipe where applicable for the Pull Push fitted versions (which are neatly designed to mount  behind the bottom edge of the buffer beam.

A close up of No. 1324 looking into the cab

Hornby have certainly captured the look and dimensions of the prototype well and includes many separately applied parts including: pipework, handrails, lamp irons (front and rear) whistle, safety vales, smokebox dart, sprung buffers, sand pipes, a sliding cab roof shutter and steps. The cab features a fully detailed interior with leavers, control vales and dials all suitable painted. Both the front and rear spectacles are glazed with the rear ones fitted with glazing bars and the bunker coal load is removable.

Looking at home on Canute Road Quay, resting between shunting turns.

Livery application of all the released versions that I have seen is up to the usual very high standard that we have come to expect from Hornby. The selection of the SR Olive Green livery version as No. 1324 is convenient (possibly on purpose) as this loco retained this livery right until nationalisation before gaining BR lined black, so she never gained wartime SR Black with Sunshine letter so widens her period of operation (it makes a change for me not to have to repaint a model to suit my own 1946 to 1949 period, although I dare say a repainted one will enter the fleet at some stage  in the future).

Once  again Hornby are to be commended for the product of another excellent Southern model. Knowing that the earlier released  livery versions have already sold out with most stockists the H Class is bound to be a success as further livery variants are announced in future catalogues.

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