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Archive for the ‘Making Quay Changes’ Category

This is the fifth in the series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  In this post we are firmly in the Southampton Docks but after 1962 when the Class 07 diesels were specifically introduced to modernise the operations in the docks.

A pair of Heljan Class 07 models meet at Canute Road Quay

Class 07 D2985 arrives at the quay

D2988 is from the second Heljan production batch

Passing Class 07s at Canute Road quay

A busy moment in time at Canute Road Quay

D2985 arrives on the quay and passes D2988 awaiting to depart

D2985 arrives at the quay

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the

Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) items such as the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. are loose, so it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

The USA 0-6-0 tanks had been in service within Southampton Docks since 1946, Due to the various tight curves within Southampton Docks utilising existing Diesel shunters such as the EE 350HP, later 09 class was not going to be an option. Therefore in 1962 Fourteen 0-6-0 diesel-electric shunting 275HP locomotives specifically for use in Southampton Docks were purchased by British Railways from Ruston Paxman.  They had a wheelbase of only 8 ft 7½ in, compared with 11 ft 6 in for an 08. With their high well glazed cab offset between long and short bonnets they certainly had their own distinctive character.

The Heljan models, as per my review here, have captured the look of the prototype well. The feature a multi part injection  moulded body with fine etched front and rear nose grills on a heavy diecast chassis. Separately fitted items include: metal handrails, sprung buffers, windscreen wipers, pipework, roof mounted air horns and factory fitted screw link couplings. Underneath the body the chassis features the correct air cylinders, sand boxes, sand pipes, other pipework and brake gear. Also fitted is a working lubricator linkage on the left hand side (when viewed long bonnet forward. Included with the model are discs, including those with duty numbers, as used within Southampton Docks.

When paired with the suitable later era rolling stock, that I have now collected and weathered, the Heljan Class 07s certainly look the part and with their smooth running make shunting at Canute Road Quay easy and a refreshing change from my usual period.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay may or may not be set in its usual location, so once again, where and what era will it be…?

 

 

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This is the fourth in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s  and #3 post set in the 1920/30s. We now move somewhere / anywhere in the late 1950s / 60s with industrial locomotives providing the horse power.

Passing Peckets a modified Hornby W4 0-4-0t passes a B2 0-6-0t renamed as ‘O.S.V.Bullied’

A Hornby B2 0-6-0t ‘Leader’ shunts at the quay

a modified Hattons Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t simmers

Peckett B4 0-6-0t ‘O.V.S. Bullied’ crosses towards the quayside

A pair of Hornby Sentinels pass each other with ‘Cattewater’ passing ‘Graham’

‘Cattewater’ stays on brand shunting an oil tank wagon

the outside cranked ‘Graham’ is on loan from the Oxfordshire Ironstone Co.

ex Class 05 now No.2 pauses at the crossing

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case Canute Road Quay‘s is off the British Railways network and could be any private quayside / wharf. In and around Southampton alone there were a myriad of rail served private docks and wharves including inner and outer docks and those along the River Itchen such as Dibles Wharf, Notham, Britannia and Victoria wharf,  many of which had their own locomotives.

In this case we see a number of locomotives privately operated ranging from steam locomotives to diesel shunters sharing duties around the quay.

The steam locomotives include the the Hornby W4 0-4-0t and B2 0-6-0t Pecketts, and the Hatton’s Andrew Barclay 14″ 0-6-0t both of which I have modified for use on Canute Road Quay. As per my Workbench Witterings #3 post they have been fitted with the use of dumb, usually basic wooden blocks, buffers so often seen at such locations. They remained in surface well into the 1960s and in some cases beyond. My B2 Pecketts have had their identities changed to be ‘O.V.S. Bullied’ and ‘Leader’ (spot the theme…), nameplates obtained from my friends at 247 Developments,  and weathered.

The early 1960s saw the introduction of a number of diesel shunters such as the 34 ton chain drive 4 wheel Rolls-Royce diesel powered Sentinel shunter rated at 233hp and the later 325hp, 38 ton style with outside cranks.
The Hornby Esso  4wDM version was introduced in 1963 and was for use in the Esso Bitumen works at Cattewater, hence its name, in Plymouth
‘Graham’ (Hornby must have been tempting me to purchase this one on purpose!) was delivered new to the Oxfordshire Ironstone company as Locomotive No.10207 in May 1965 and was fitted with vacuum braking and a higher ratio gearbox for mainline working, so is obviously on loan to the quayside.
The Hornby models have been modified slightly with the lifting eyes at each end having their holes drilled out, the wasp stripes on ‘Cattewater’ continued on the side of the bufferbeam as per the prototype and also weathered.

Moving towards the late 1960s saw some of the myriad of early BR shunter types being withdrawn and some entering industrial service such as the ex Class 05. This Heljan example is modelled on the second batch built by Hunslet Engine Company of Leeds and built in 1961 numbered D2574 to D2618, had a  higher roof line, smaller wheels (3’4″ instead of 3’9″) deeper buffers with oval heads than the first batch built in 1955. D2578 was sold to HP Bulmers in 1968 and is now preserved, but seen here working at the quay.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay  the next such post will be be set in its usual location, but what era will it be…?

 

 

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This is the third in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  It follows my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, and then back to Southampton with my Making Quay Changes #2 post but in the 1950s. In this post we remain in the Southampton Docks but in the 1920s heading into the 1930s.

Canute Road Quay in mid 1920s ‘Guernsey’ passes ‘Caen’ showing the two Southampton Docks liveries

‘Caen’ passes ‘Trueville’ both heading into the 1930s

Shunting continues on Canute Road Quay

No.88 in early SR livery visits the Docks shed as ‘Guernsey’ shunts

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) It therefore allows me to change the location and era with different rolling stock, vehicles and details.

In this case we have stayed at Canute Road Quay‘s intended setting but time travelled to a time between the wars moving from the roaring 1920s to the uncertain 1930s with the prospect of peace being unsettled and ruining the phrase “the war to end all wars”

Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

In this case we still see the lovely range of Dapol B4 class 0-4-0 tanks bringing a splash of colour to the scene with the early Southampton Docks lined green livery being replaced during the 1920s with the possibly more familiar lined brown livery that was maintained until the B4 tanks were replaced at the Docks by the USA tanks after the second world war. We also see in this period colourful private owner wagons (before they were nationally pooled and unkempt during WW2).

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay may or may not be set in its usual location, so where and what era will it be…?

 

 

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This is the second in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  After my Making Quay Changes #1 post moving the scene Eastwards, perhaps to the docks of Ipswich or Yarmouth,  utilising the lovely Model Rail magazine limited edition ex Great Eastern Railway J70 class 0-6-0 tram engines

Two USA tanks 30064 and 30067

Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay has very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…)

USA tank 30067 continues to shunt

It therefore allows me to change the location and era with different rolling stock, vehicles and details.

USA tank 30067 is joined by B4 30089

In this case we have stayed at Canute Road Quay‘s intended setting but time travelled to a time when wartime rationing had at long last come to an end by moving into the British Railways late 1950s era.

30089 joins 30067 on shed between turns

Having deliberately when building Canute Road Quay left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, it enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

USA tank 30064 adds a splash of colour to proceedings

In this case we still see the excellent Model Rail Magazine USA tanks, produced by Bachmann,  still handling the mainstay of the work, with a slight reference to the past due to a visiting ex LSWR Adams B4, by Dapol, all British Railways liveries.

The change in period also sees slightly more modern wagons and vehicles appearing, along a few older ones that have managed to get a repaint to the latest British Railways livery.

30067 catches the light on the quayside

At least, we are, unlike my first ‘Making Quay Changes’ post back to the Southern albeit Southern Region.

I hope you enjoy this post, the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay will also still be set in its usual location but again time travelling, but what era will it be…?

 

 

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Although my usual modelling genre, as regular readers will know, is the Southern Railway between 1946 and 1949, however due to Canute Road Quay having very few visual references to either period or location (yes there are a couple, but hey…) it allows me to change the location and era with different rolling stock, vehicles and details.

No. 7128 in LNER Wartime livery with full skirts sits on the shed.

I have deliberately left the vehicles and other details such as crates, sack stacks and oil drums etc. loose, this enables them to be both be moved around, to give some variety in photographs, and or replaced with other items to different periods.

No. 7126 in LNER lined livery with no skirts

This is the first in a series of ‘Making Quay Changes’ posts with the Canute Road Quay being transported to either a different location or era or both.  In this case we have stayed in my usual era but moved Eastwards, to perhaps the docks of Ipswich or Yarmouth  utilising the lovely Model Rail magazine limited edition ex Great Eastern Railway J70 class 0-6-0 tram engines (or Toby’s if you prefer).

The pair together

The J70 share the quayside with a Peckett W4 class and an Andrew Barclay, modified Hornby and Hattons models.

The locomotives were manufactured on behalf of Model Rail Magazine by Rapido of Canada.

The pair again at the Quay

They are such delightful models featuring: a coreless motor, options of fully skirted or unskirted, open or closed window and front doors and the distinctive cow catchers; I could not resist the urge to purchase a couple!

The two J70 models I have represent a version still with full side skirts and one with the skirts partially removed.

No. 7128 simmers in front of the quayside offices

I have also varied the front door and window positions, fitted crew members and lightly weathered.
I feel the weathering really brings out the details of these models and tones down, my possible only criticism of the model, their out of box very bright orange woodwork finish.

No. 7128 shares the quayside with a Peckett W4 class (modified Hornby)

This weathering has followed my usual practice of layers colours including: brake dust, dirt, rust, soot etc. via different processes of: drybrushing, washes and airbrushing along with cleaning some areas with a cotton bud but leaving the dirt in the crevasses and corners.

No. 7126 meets an Andrew Barclay (Modified Hattons model)

The J70 class designed by James Holden was a more powerful version of the earlier Y4 0-4-0 tram engine designed by T.W.  Warsdell and 12 were built at the Great Eastern Railway’s Stratford Works between 1903 and 1921.

A last view of Nos. 7126 and 7128 together

During their lifetime, the last being withdrawn in  1955, the J70 class were used at: Ipswich Docks, Yarmouth, Colchester Hythe Docks and of course on the iconic Wisbech and Upwell Tramway for which they gained their most fame.

I hope you enjoy this slightly different post, I apologise to the die hard Southern Railway / Region readers for this post being of Great Eastern / LNER content, but worry not, I will make amends in the next ‘Making Quay Changes’ post with Canute Road Quay back at its spiritual home of Southampton Docks but a different era, but what will it be…?

 

 

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