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I have now made two previous posts on this blog about the 1948 locomotive exchange trials, and my models of the locomotives that featured on Southern metals and would have passed through Salisbury and therefore can occasionally be seen on Fisherton Sarum. The first Talking Stock # 2 post focused mainly on  the Express Passenger and general purpose locomotive trials whilst the second post Talking Stock #30 focused on the less often referred to freight locomotives trialed. This post is by way of my own thoughts and conclusion about the actual trials themselves.

Ex LMS City of Bradford Heads past Fisherton Sarum onm an Exteter to Waterloo working. Note the WD tender fitted due to lack of water troughs on the SR.

Ex LMS City of Bradford Heads past Fisherton Sarum onm an Exteter to Waterloo working. Note the WD tender fitted due to lack of water troughs on the SR.

These trials were not attempting to judge an overall winner but to gain an insight and comparisons of good design and practice that could be in theory carried across into the future design of new British Railways steam locomotives.

A number of observers are of the opinion that the trials should have been larger to encompass more locomotive varieties and that there are some notable missing classes.

Ministry of Supply WD 2-10-0 number 73774

Ministry of Supply WD 2-10-0 number 73774

Some of the missing classes that have been mentioned include: the Western Region’s Castle Class, the London Midland Region’s Royal Scots or Jubilees, the Eastern Region’s V2s and of course the Southern Region’s Lord Nelson; of which a direct comparison with the Royal Scot Class would have been very interesting due to similarity on the origins of the designs. Also as I mentioned in my Talking Stock #30 post the Southern did not put any freight locomotive forward so perhaps the design of the S15 whilst being a possible contender was considered to be too old.

ex LNER A4 Seagull heads towards Exeter.

ex LNER A4 Seagull heads towards Exeter.

One major inconsistency that directly affected all the recorded parameters, despite all the precautions taken, was with the locomotive crews. The method of engine control varied; from those crews trying to be as economic as possible, such as the London Midland crews, whom allowed timings to slip to the benefit of coal consumption; whilst others, especially the Southern Region crews,  were keen to show the best of what the engines could do performance wise including some extremely impressive hill climbs. Coal and water, but not oil, consumption’s were all recorded and compared along with horsepower outputs and overall efficiencies. These therefore varied considerably by the style of driving. Additionally; loads on each test run varied rather than being controlled to be something near constant and that on a number runs considerable signal checks were experienced rather than Control ensuring a clear run where possible.

Ex LMS Royal Scot Hussar

Ex LMS Royal Scot Hussar

Also the Southern Region crews were not used to such prolonged running due to the relatively short maximum length of route available; 143 miles, between Waterloo and Exeter compared to runs on other regions ranging from 172 to 299 miles. The later being between Euston and Carlisle which was also longer than usually worked by the Eastern Region crews too.

Eastern Region O1 class 2-8-0 number 63789

Eastern Region O1 class 2-8-0 number 63789

As all locomotives were coaled with Yorkshire hard coal this immediately put the Western Region engines at a slight disadvantage as the drafting arrangements for these engines had been designed around the use of softer South Wales steam coal. Subsequent additional tests were carried on the Western Region with these engines on their more usual South Wales steam coal which did result in an improvement in coal consumption.

Due to the inconsistencies explained above it is very difficult to grade or score the performances of individual locomotives designs. In some cases locomotives were inconsistent on consumption, horsepower between runs or varied from route to route.  Some of the possible conclusions that can be drawn are as follows:

  • In the express passenger group it was a close run thing on efficiencies between the Eastern A4s and the London Midland Duchess Class.
    All of the Pacific’s were very consistent across all runs; however the results of the 4-6-0s varied more across the different routes.
  • In the general purpose engines group the Southern Region West County Pacific’s put in some brilliant and very impressive performances but these were at the expense of efficiency figures as already implied. The London Midland Region Class 5’s showed the best efficiencies of this group. The Eastern Region B1 class showed some considerable fluctuations in efficiencies between routes.
  • The greatest variation in overall efficiencies was experienced with the freight group with no engine type being consistent across all routes although the closest to this was the Eastern Region O1 class, but it put in a variable performance on the Eastleigh – Bristol route for an unexplained reason.
  • The widest variation of all in efficiencies and performance was seen with the Ministry of Supply WD 2-8-0 and 2-10-0 locomotives. In fact the 2-8-0s did not on the whole distinguish themselves very well at all.
  • Whilst the Eastern Region A4 class locomotives put in some fine performances they were marred by the fact that there were three failures during the testing attributed to the middle big end overheating on each occasion.

The data recorded and utilised in the final report was not generally seen by most as being fully conclusive, not helped by the fact that it took no account of the costs of construction or average costs of maintenance for each locomotive design.

Whilst it is also generally considered that future British Railways standard designs perhaps bore more resemblance to the origins of their designer, the trials were if nothing else a Public relations exercise for the newly formed British Railways as a show of unity between the now Regions.

Next Saturday 1st November is the annual Wycrail model railway exhibition of the High Wycombe and District Model Railway Society, of which I am a member. Fisherton Sarum is returning to this exhibition having made its public debut at the 2006 show.

Looking Across the shed yard at Fisherton Sarum

Looking Across the shed yard at Fisherton Sarum

This year’s Wycrail ’14 exhibition will once again, take place at the now established, larger and bigher venue of The Cressex Community School, Holmers Lane, High Wycombe, Bucks HP12 4UD.

Wycrail ‘14 will have 28 high quality and inspirational model railway layouts, of British, North American and Continental outline and in a wide range of scales and gauges including 2mm finescale, N, 3mm, 00, H0, EM, P4, 0 and narrow gauges.
Layout highlights include: the delightful 2mm finescale ‘Tucking Mill’, Welsh narrow gauge in 009 with ‘That Dam Railway , ‘Georgemas Junction’ based on the real location in Scotland in 00,   ‘Diesels in the Duchy’ recreating, in EM gauge,  St Blazey during the 1980’s Sectorisation period, ‘Fourgig East’ in 0 guage  and bringing  a North American flavour in HO. ‘Galatia, KS’.

Full trade support will be present ranging from tools, kits, electronic components to R-T-R models and books.

The Limited Edition Chesham and Wycomb e Co-operative Coal Merchants wagon available at Wycrail

The Limited Edition Chesham and Wycomb e Co-operative Coal Merchants wagon available at Wycrail

Once again the Society has teamed up with the West Wales Wagon Works and commissioned a limited edition wagon based on a local coal merchant ‘Chesham and Wycombe Co-operative Coal Merchants’.  The model that will be available at the show is based the Dapol 10t open wagon.

The venue is conveniently close to the M40 Junction 4 and the free vintage bus service will once again be operated between Wycombe Railway Station (Chiltern Line) and Wycombe Town Centre  to the Cressex Community School.

It is always a good show so come along and say hello, you never know you might even get a Fisherton Sarum controller thrust into your hands! Further information and details can be found on the Societies website at www.hwdmrs.org.uk

 

 

Fisherton Sarum will be making its penultimate appearance of the year this weekend, the 18th and 19th of October, at thePeterborough National Festival of Railway Modeling  at the East of England Showground near Peterborough. This show is organised by Warners publications the group behind the British Railway Modelling Magazine.

nevard_081024_fisherton_DSC_2673_webFisherton Sarum will be stand 126 in the centre of the main hall. There will at least 30 layouts at the show, along with the usual mix of traders and the BRM Village with a mix of layouts, demonstrators and a chance to meet the team behind the magazine.

In addition to exhibiting Fisherton Sarum I shall also be involved, both days of the show,  in a Question and Answer session each day in the Model Railways Live theatre discussing the background to Fisherton Sarum, a passion for all things Southern Railway and also my involvement assisting a number of the model manufacturers, such as the Kernow Model Rail Centre, with their Southern Railway related models.

I hope to see you there, please come and say hello. If you unable to attend this weekend then perhaps you might be able to get along to see Fisherton Sarum at the Wycrail ’14 show, the annual show of my own local model railway society the High Wycombe and District MRS.   being held on The 1st of November. Full details can be found on the dedicated Wycrail website here.

This coming weekend 11th / 12th October sees the second Great Electric Train Show organised by Hornby Magazine  will feature 25 top quality layouts across all of the scales. This year as well as usual for such Hornby Magazine events I can be found not only behind one of Magazine Editor Mike Wild’s layouts  ‘Twelve Trees Junction’, making its exhibition debut, but also ‘Hinton Parva’ from the High Wycombe and District Model Railway Society of which I am member.

The Great Electric Train Show is being held at the Heritage Motor Centre at Gaydon in Warwickshire, and admission to the exhibition also includes entry into the Museum itself.  Further details of the show can be found here.

Hornby Magazine's latest layout Twelve Trees Junction a combination of Southern Region steam and EMUs

Hornby Magazine’s latest layout Twelve Trees Junction a combination of Southern Region steam and EMUs.

Built by Mike Wild and Mark Chivers for the Hornby Magazine Yearbook No. 6, Twelve Trees Junction represents a busy Southern Region main line station and junction close to London. At its heart is a double junction which creates two routes – one through the station and one on avoiding lines. A large number of sound fitted locomotives will also be operating consisting of steam and diesel locomotives as well as third-rail Electric Multiple Units.

Where the Regions meet Hinton Parva with a Southern / Western secondary line meeting the Midland and Eastern main line

Where the Regions meet Hinton Parva with a Southern / Western secondary line meeting the Midland and Eastern main line

High Wycombe and District Model Railway Society’s Hinton Parva depicts a junction station in the mid-1950s with Midland and Eastern Region services running on the main line and Western and Southern Region services coming in off the branch.  Built first and foremost for operation, the aim is to always have at least one train movement and usually more at anyone time due to the seven operators deployed. All the signals are fully working and interlocked comprising of 37 semaphore and a small number of colour light signals. I have had quite a hand in the construction of this layout (and provided some of the BR Southern Region stock) therefore quite of bit of Southern based architecture has crept in via the buildings I have scratch built for the layout, see if you can spot them.

In addition to the two layouts above there are others with a Southern interest such as: Thonbury Hill, Knights Hill,  Casterbridge and Wellbridge

As you might have guessed The Great Electric Train Show does feature Steam and Diesel models but they are of course in model form being electric powered. I hope to see you there!

Pictures copyright and courtesy Mike Wild / Chris Nevard / Hornby Magazine

Over the last few years an annual wish list poll has been run as a collaboration between MREmag and  RMweb it is no coincidence that many of the items that have appeared at the top of these polls in past years have subsequently appeared in the main manufactures ranges.

The Wishlist Poll 2014 will run from 1 to 31 October and you can take part here.

The purpose of The Poll is to provide an easy and enjoyable way for modellers and collectors to tell the major manufacturers and commissioners of ready-to-run railway models what they would like to see made from new tooling (excluding models announced, tooled or made since 2000).

There are 21 categories in N and 00 covering: Steam locos of the Big Four and BR; Diesel & Electric Locos; DMUs & EMUs; Coaches; Non-passenger-carrying Coaching Stock; Freight Stock; General Service Stock; and other railway-related items (such as turntables). Two new categories this year cover Standard Gauge Industrial and London Underground.

To act as an aide-memoire, the 9-man Poll Team has again provided The Guide. If you don’t know the build dates of the various BR Mk1 catering vehicles, or whether one particular 0-6-0 steam loco will suit your needs better than others, you will find all the answers there – and many more! This guide can be found here.

If you have any queries, please contact The Poll Team by email here

Go on…vote for anything Southern you know you want to…go on…that’s right Southern…

There are two more chances to see Fisherton Sarum in operation at exhibitions this year, I have timed this post to act a reminder and hopefully give you a chance to include them in your diary. As regular readers of this blog will know I only usually exhibit the layout at three or four shows each year. I am as ever indebted to my parents and fellow members of the High Wycombe and District Model Railway Society for their time and assistance at these shows to enable Fisherton Sarum to be exhibited at all.

Fisherton Sarum - LR - 20The first of the two shows coming up is the Peterborough National Festival of Railway Modeling being held on the 18th and 19th of October, at the East of England Showground near Peterborough. This show is organised by Warners publications the group behind the British Railway Modelling Magazine.

nevard_081024_fisherton_DSC_2673_webFisherton Sarum will be stand 126 in the centre of the main hall. There will at least 30 layouts at the show, along with the usual mix of traders and the BRM Village with a mix of layouts, demonstrators and a chance to meet the team behind the magazine.
In addition to exhibiting Fisherton Sarum I shall also be involved in a Question and Answer session each day in the Model Railways Live theatre discussing the background to Fisherton Sarum, a passion for all things Southern Railway and also my involvement assisting a number of the model manufacturers, such as the Kernow Model Rail Centre, with their Southern Railway related models.

nevard_130213_FishertnSraum_DSC_4061_vanillaThe 1st of November sees
Fisherton Sarum being exhibited a little closer to home at Wycrail ’14 the annual show of my own local model railway society the High Wycombe and District MRS.  
Wycrail has established itself as one of the best one day shows in the South of England, (as said by others not just my own possibly biased opinion!)  and this year maintains the standard with 28 high quality layouts attending  along with a good mix of traders and demonstrators.  Full details can be found on the dedicated Wycrail website here.
It is held in the excellent large,  bright and modern Cressex Community School, located in Cressex Road, High Wycombe, HP12 4UD. A free bus service is also provided between High Wycombe Station on the Chiltern Line, Wycombe town centre and the exhibition venue.
This will be Fisherton Sarum’s second appearance at Wycrail as it made its public debut at the 2006 exhibition.

I sincerely hope you get a chance to visit at least one or other of the shows and please make sure you come and say hello, as it is always a pleasure to meet new friends made via this blog.

The Kernow Model Rail Centre have today announced that they have commissioned DJ Models to produce the LSWR 10T Diagram 1541 Road Van in OO Gauge as an exclusive model with the tooling owned by Kernow Model Rail Centre.

The Road Van used for Scanning on the Isle of Wight Railway

No. 56046 that was scanned on the Isle of Wight Railway

First introduced in 1886 they were later classed as SR Diagram 1541.  Almost 500 of these were built between then and 1905 making them the most numerous LSWR Goods Brake Van.  Brake Vans with side doors through which parcels or other goods could be loaded were known as road vans.

The CAD for this model is virtually complete

The CAD for this model is virtually complete

The prototype was laser scanned at the Isle of Wight Steam Railway at the same time that they scanned the  ex LWSR Adams O2 Class locomotive. 

I have been working with Kernow Model Rail Centre for a while now on the research and development of this model.

The latest cads, seen left,  are almost complete with just a few very minor tweaks required before tooling can commence.

A further CAD view

A further CAD view

The model joins their growing portfolio of LSWR models and will be ideal for use with their ex LSWR Adams O2 Class locomotive as they will be producing mainland and Isle of Wight numbered vehicles.

The models will be £24.99 each and no deposits are required.

The initial variations are as follows:

  • SB003A Number 56046 in SR Brown livery with red ends.  (Isle of Wight)
  • SB003B Number 12424 in LSWR Brown livery with red ends. (Mainland)
  • SB003C Number DS 54538 in BR Bauxite livery with “RETURN TO THREE BRIDGES” branding. (Mainland)
  • SB003D  Number S56055 in BR Bauxite livery. (Isle of Wight)
  • SB003E Number S56050 in BR Grey livery. (Isle of Wight)
  • SB003F Number S54730 in BR Grey livery. (Mainland)
  • SB003G Number S54656 in BR Bauxite livery. (Mainland)
  • SB003H Number 54611 in SR pre-1936 Brown livery with red ends. (Mainland)
  • SB003J Number 54551 in SR post-1936 Brown livery. (Mainland)
  • SB003K Number 56045 in SR post-1936 Brown livery. (Isle of Wight)

Further product and ordering information can be found on the Kernow Models Website here.

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