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Hornby have today announced via their Engine Shed blog that they are to release, in 2016, Southern Railway 58ft non corridor brake coaches, to diagrams 99 and 418, that formed two-coach 2-Lav Sets Nos. 42-46, converted in 1936.  Also to be released are the diagram 98 six compartment Brake Third Lavatory (physically the same as the Diagram 418 but without first class branding and all third style seating) and the diagram 31 Third Lavatory, converted in 1935, that were used as loose coaches for strengthening trains, one example of the diagram 31 No 320 is preserved on the Bluebell Railway, having been one of the first two coaches operated by the fledgling line.
These coaches totally compliment the ex LSWR Adams class 0415 radial tank being released later this year as the 2-Lav sets regularly operated on the Lyme Regis and other Devon / Dorset branches between 1935 and 1958.

The potential release of such coaches was hinted at last Friday via their video released here of the Adams radial running sample that purposely and cheekily showed the engineering samples being hauled by the radial tank, prior to today’s announcement.

These coaches were made up from ex London and South Western Railway  (LSWR) 48ft bodies, originally built between 1894 and 1902, mounted on completely new 58ft underframes. Each of  sets 42 to 46 comprised of one eight-compartment Brake Third (Dia 99) and one six-compartment Brake Composite Lavatory (Dia 418). The bodies being extended in length accordingly. The new underframes were to newer standard dimensions, intended for a coach body 6″ wider than the ex LSWR coaches, the bodies were slightly widened and these rebuilds can be easily identified by the weatherboard strip along the bottom edge to keep rain out of the gap between the body and underframe. The new underframes had the SR standard 8’0″ steam bogie, therefore the bodies resembled traditional LSWR practice whilst the underframes resembled the SR’s Maunsell Restriction 4 stock (as already produced by Hornby).  

Hornby should be congratulated on the joined up thinking of producing suitable coaching stock for use with the previously announced ex LSWR Adams Class 0415 radial tank. This change in announcement policy follows on from unexpected announcements such as the original style Merchant Navy made earlier this year. It further demonstrates the positive progress being made by the Hornby development team, as I can personally vouch that they have been working on these coaches since last year, and some yet to be announced future products.

As I hinted in my summer comes soonest post on Saturday, this post was prepared prior to my vacation and was correct at the time of writing and I will amend and or provide additional information in due course.

With once again a respectful nod to the 1936 Southern Publicity Department, I am soon heading very south (well about 2 and half  hours and some 870 miles roughly south east in fact) for some vini, prosciutto, guanciale, Parmigiano-Reggiano (should help you guess where), exploration including a few spectacular ruins,  rest, relaxation and hopefully some sun and sea too. There will as a result be a break in posts (with the exception of possibly a surprise announcement early next week)  in my humble corner of the interweb and blogospehre, with normal service being resumed week commencing the 29th June.

summer posterThe now famous Southern Railway publicity poster  ’I’m Taking and Early Holiday cos I know Summer Comes Soonest in the South’, was first released in 1936. It was dubiously parodied later by the Late and Never Early Railway, imitation being… etc. etc.

The Photograph, originally in black and white, was  taken in 1924 by Charles E Brown and shows a small boy carrying a suitcase on the platform at Waterloo station talking to the fireman of N15 King Arthur class 4-6-0 locomotive No 755 ‘The Red Knight’, as he leans from the cab. The Southern Railway publicity department had the image coloured for use on this poster the hint of the black and white original can be seen beyond the locomotive.

I know this post is a cheat, as this is a repeat of a similar post from the last few summer vacations, but I am already in holiday mode. If you are also about to head off on vacation or have one planned over the summer months then enjoy!

Just in case you get withdrawal symptoms feel free to click here to view a totally random post,

Today’s post is an update / catch up on the status of a few Southern Railway / Region related models that are in progress with a number of the Ready to Run manufacturers / commissioners from N to 0 gauge.

Kernow Model Centre

Regular readers of my blog will know that I have been assisting the Kernow Model Centre with their Southern related commissions and I pleased to be able to report progress on a number of fronts.

Livery sample of the Kernwo Models O2 K2105 in SR post war black livery as No. 225

Latest livery sample of the Kernow Models Centre O2 K2105 in SR post war black livery as No. 225

Firstly: livery samples of the mainland version of the Adams O2 have now been received, a number of corrections made and already second livery samples returned in the last week or so. Once all the variations are finally signed off then production can start, along with the Isle of Wight versions that were fully signed off a while ago now. Further information on the Kernow model Centre O2’s can be found here.

ex LSWR Gate Stock parts hot of of the injection moulding machines, can you guess what each part is?

ex LSWR Gate Stock parts hot off of the injection moulding machines, can you guess what each part is?

Secondly: It had been kept reasonably quiet, that the although the CADs for the ex LSWR Gate Stock Pull Push sets were previously signed off, tooling has actually commenced and The Kernow Model Centre have now received photographs of the first off components from the tooling. These now require assembly and shipping to the UK for inspection. Further information on the Kernow Model Centre ex LSWR Gate Stock can be found here.

Lastly for now: I can also advise that work is also progressing in the background with updates and corrections to the CADs for the ex LSWR Dia 1541 10T road vans, first announced last September. So watch this space for further news.

Bachmann

The Bachmann livery sample for the SR PLV

The Bachmann livery sample for the SR PLV

The first livery samples for the Bachmann  four wheel luggage vans PLV/PMV and CCT’s first announced in March 2012  have now been received and all can be seen here on the Bachmann website. They are producing the following:
39-525 Southern PLV Passenger Luggage Van Southern Railway Green
39-526 Ex-Southern PMV Parcels & Miscellaneous Van BR Crimson
39-527 Ex-Southern PMV Parcels & Miscellaneous Van BR Green
39-528 Ex-Southern CCT Covered Carriage Truck BR Blue – Weathered

Graham Farish

The first of the original Merchant Navy Pacific models that I reviewed in my post here have now actually started to appear with the retailers.

Graham Farish N Class No. 31844

Graham Farish N Class No. 31844

The N Class Mogul 2-6-0 first announced in March 2013 is now on its way,  with the review samples having been received by the model media so they should start to appear with retailers during July and August. Just like the Merchant Navy, I can vouch for the fact that it is an impressive looking model, especially for its size, and continues the increase in levels of detail for N Gauge Ready to Run models. A video of these models, but sadly not actually running, can be viewed on their website here.
The following four initial variations are being produced:
372-930 No. 868 in SR Olive Green
372-931 No. 31844 in BR Black Early Emblem
372-932 No. 31811 in BR Black Late Crest
372-933 No. 810 in SECR Grey

The livery samples for the Bogie Van B model have been signed off and the expected delivery of the of these models is currently due the end of August / September.

Dapol

Dapol cad of the 4mm ex LSWR style lattice post working signal

Dapol cad of the 4mm ex LSWR style lattice post working signal

Dapol have via their Facebook page here (you do not have to be a member to access the page) Dapol have released CAD images of  the planned 4mm working signals in both SR Rail built and also ex LSWR  lattice post styles. [Edit:] Dapol have also advised 2mm version of these signals are planned.

At the start of last month they also announced a delay to the O Gauge Terrier due to the the level of electromagnetic emissions. A slight modification is now required to the production which will result in delay in the shipment of the initial SR green and LBSC versions towards the end of July, however the BR and Bodiam variants are now due to be delivered three to four weeks later.

I have also been informed that the CAD work on the first variants of  the N Gauge Schools class first announced in July 2012 have been completed, I had already provided some corrections and information to Dapol for these a while back so it is good to hear that they are progressing, but no news as yet when tooling might actually commence.

[Edit:] I have also been reminded that BR green liveried versions of the N gauge Maunsell coaches are due out next month and that Dapol have also now committed to bringing out a brake composite and four compartment brake third by Quarter 4 2015 and these are currently at CAD/CAM stage. This will make possible several prototypical set formations.

Hornby

[Further Edit 12/06/15] Hornby have today released a video via their Engine Shed blog post here from their development team that shows the first running sample of the Adams Radial. Keen eyes should also check out the coaches that the sample is hauling as I think the cat might have been let out of the bag on some other appropriate items  they have planned for release in 2016, that I was previously made aware of, but I wont say anymore until more formal information is released…so watch this space…

Fresh off the workbench today is a Hornby Schools Class R2844 number 30934 “St Lawrence” in early BR lined black but in my time honoured fashion, as per my post here,  has been repainted and renumbered to appear as Number 929 “Malvern” in Southern post war black livery. Again this is one of those projects I started a while ago but felt was about time I progressed nearer to completion.

Hornby Schools Class now repainted into SR post war black, numbered and named as 929 'Malvern'. Now just awaits weathering.

Hornby Schools Class now repainted into SR post war black, numbered and named as 929 ‘Malvern’. Now just awaits weathering.

Following repainting and HMRS decals being applied, her “Malvern” nameplates, from Fox Transfers were fixed and the separately fitted details such as pipework, windows and safety valves refitted.  Real coal has also been added to the tender. She now awaits weathering as per my usual methods, I tend to wait until I have a number of items ready for weather to get the most from setting up the airbrush and spray booth etc.

Schools class number 929 “Malvern” was one of only seven members of the class not to regain malachite green livery after the war, but stayed in SR black until January 1949 when she was renumbered to 30929 and outshopped in British Railways lined black.
She was allocated to Bournemouth shed in 1946 before moving to Brighton in 1947> The Schools class were not often seen at Salisbury, but from the perspective of Fisherton Sarum, she might have arrived on one of the Brighton to Plymouth services that changed locomotives at Salisbury, that’s my excuse anyway…

This months picture…

A Drummond T14 4-6-0 “Paddlebox” 461 a NuCast kit heads towards London with a Meldon Quarry Ballast train. The SR Diagram 1774 40T hoppers are modified LIMA wagons on new bogies and other details. Salisbury Cathedral can be seen in the background

A Drummond T14 4-6-0 “Paddlebox” 461 a NuCast kit heads towards London with a Meldon Quarry Ballast train. The SR Diagram 1774 40T hoppers are modified LIMA wagons on new bogies and other details. Salisbury Cathedral can be seen in the background

As promised a few posts ago when I first opened the box on my Wild Boar Models  45T Ransomes and Rapier Steam Breakdown Crane I thought it was about time I started “a whats on my workbench” type series of posts, so welcome to the first of my “Workbench Witterings“. I am sure I am similar to many modellers in that I have a large number of both unstarted and or unfinished projects on the go,  so hopefully this series of posts might encourage me to actually get on with completing a few of the outstanding things currently on the go…

The Wild Boar Models $T Ransomes and Rapier steam crane is nearly complete, just the rigging to go.

The Wild Boar Models 45T Ransomes and Rapier SR steam crane is nearly complete, just the rigging to go. I have modelled number 1561S

First up then is progress on the above mentioned 45T steam crane. Following the comprehensive instructions for this kit has been pretty easy and all the parts, a mix of 3D printed and brass etchings have good together really well and enabled painting to commence. Where the parts needed to simply clip in place or be held with brass wire acting as hinge pins such as between the weight relieving trucks and the main carriage or the crane body and the jib the they have done so very easily. The rest of the items including the etched brass detailing parts such as handwheels and cast name and information plates have been attached with superglue. The components were then primed using the the trusted Halfords plastic primer rattle can and then top coat brush painted using Humbrol matt 32 to represent the SR Grey livery as first carried by  the SR steam cranes before they became black in early British Railways days. I took the opportunity last week to give her a test run on the High Wycombe and District MRS test track and all was fine, although a little additional weight has now been added to the underside of the main carriage truck. All that is needed to complete is the rigging from the fine cotton supplied as part of the kit.

The Hornby Van B is now in malachhite green as number 231. I have also replaced the roof ventilators with white metal castings.

The Hornby Van B is now in malachhite green as number 231. I have also replaced the roof ventilators with white metal castings.

Secondly is the repaint of a Hornby Bogie Van B from its original blue livery to malachite green, embarrassingly looking back at this blog post here I actually started this at the end of last year! Before reassembling the Van B I took the opportunity to replace Hornby’s representation of the roof vents. Although these are separate mouldings  I felt they looked a little flat so replaced them with some suitable cast white metal ventilators from my coaching stock bits box (but I think there were originally obtained from Southern Pride Models) and then repainted the roof. She now awaits some weathering before she enters my operational fleet on Fisherton Sarum.

Now to kick off / complete a few more projects so watch this space…

 

 

 

 

 

This weekend sees a number of events taking place to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the evacuation of Allied soldiers from the beaches and harbour of Dunkirk, France, between 27 May and 4 June 1940. The Dunkirk evacuation, code named Operation Dynamo, was decided upon when large numbers of British, French, and Belgian troops were cut off and surrounded by the German army. The event is renown for the use of a flotilla of 800 small ships used to assist in the ferrying of some 338,226 soldiers to safety.

southern-railway-coat-of-arms-1923-1948The Southern Railway played very much an unsung role in Operation Dynamo, as once back on English shores the soldiers that did not require immediate hospitalisation or were already based at local South Eastern England barracks were dispersed across England away from the main reception ports of Margate, Ramsgate, Folkestone, Dover, and Newhaven. During the nine period of Operation Dynamo the Southern Railway laid on and coordinated an amazing number of special trains comprising of : 327 from Dover, 82 from Ramsgate, 75 from Margate 64 from Folkestone and also 21 ambulance trains.
These trains, known as ‘Dynamo Specials’ moved 180,982 troops, many of these services were routed via  Redhill, Guildford and Reading, in order to bypass the capital and avoid congestion. Where possible during this period the Southern Railway maintained its usual passenger services with the except of some ‘omnibus replacement services’ to free the most heavily utilised routes between Guildford, Redhill and Tonbridge. Not only was coordination required of the departing trains but also the routing of the return empty stock workings and the necessary prepared engines required to keep the transportation of soldiers as quick and efficient as possible.

The Southern Railway mustered at very short notice nearly 2000 additional carriages, many borrowed from other railway companies including 47 complete rakes from the LNER, 44 from the LMS and 40 from the GWR.  Also 180 engines and crews were required from across the network, to operate these services.

To avoid delay at Dover and Ramsgate it was decided that the soldiers, many of whom had not eaten properly for days, would be fed on the trains. Just simply feeding the men provided Southern Railway with a major logistical problem,  therefore certain rail stations were designated feeding stations. These stations included Headcorn, Tonbridge and Paddock Wood Although the Royal Army Service Corps were primarily responsible many local Women’s Voluntary Service members were involved to provide food and drink, much of which was also donated or paid for with monies rasied from the local communities. Due to the number of trains involved only an eight-minute stop for soldiers to be provide with food and drink that bearing in mind this could have been 550 per train, was again an impressive feat.  Trains often had to pull into a siding at these food stops to ensure that any ambulance trains had priority over the use of the main lines.

Given that Southern Railway had practically no time to organise and plan such an activity, what it achieved without the use of modern day communication systems was very impressive; improvisation and word of mouth were the order of the day. One unknown Army general was famously heard to say: “I wish the Army could operate with as few written instructions as Southern Railway does in an emergency.”

The Southern Railway, as well as coping with troops from Dunkirk, was also evacuating no less than 48,000 school children from the coastal areas due to fear of a German invasion. It should not go unmentioned that a number of the Southern Railway’s shipping fleet and crew, varying from cross channel passenger vessels, Isle of Wight ferries and cargo vessels were actively involved out on the channel itself,  with a number being either badly damaged or lost to enemy action.

We should also pause to remember the 68,000 of our soldiers whom didn’t make it home safely from this particular French campaign.

R3302 1940 Dunkirk train pack

R3302 1940 Dunkirk train pack

The efforts of the Southern Railway has not gone unnoticed by Hornby who are planning to release this year their R3302 ‘1940 return from Dunkirk’ train pack;  comprising of a ex LSWR Drummond 700 class No. 325 and 3 coach Maunsell low window set No. 447. Unfortunately it does not look like it they have managed to release it to specifically coincide with the actual commemoration weekend but at least the intent is there.

I hope this post goes just a little way to remember and honour the part that the Southern Railway played in the overall success of Operation Dynamo out of what was a defeat in military terms in Flanders.

 

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